Eric Schmitt

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: Missouri Senator Eric Schmitt (R-Glendale) joins as a guest to have a "free-wheeling and fun conversation" on the income tax bill the governor vetoed. Then we run through some news: the auditor's finding on the Hancock Amendment, as well as the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner.

Next week, Democratic Senator Jamilah Nasheed will join the program.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) Wednesday signed eight bills into law that were passed this year by Missouri lawmakers.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Legislation to redefine the relationship between liquor distributors, wholesalers and retailers has stalled in the Missouri Senate.

Tim Lloyd, St. Louis Public Radio

Two tax credit bills passed by Missouri lawmakers have become the first ones signed into law this year by Governor Jay Nixon (D). 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation that would provide tax breaks for amateur sporting events held in Missouri has become the first one sent to Governor Jay Nixon (D) during the 2013 regular session.

The incentives would equal about $5 per ticket sold, and they would be capped at $3 million a year.  It was sponsored by State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale).

Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation that would allow home brewers to bring home-made beer to festivals has passed the Missouri Senate.

Under Senate Bill 114, home-brewers could give away free samples to guests at beer festivals and tastings, but would not be allowed to sell them.  The sponsor, State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale), says an emergency clause was added so that home brewers can take part in this year’s Brewer’s Heritage Festival in St. Louis.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

It appears so far that the Missouri Senate may no longer be the place where tax credits go to die.

In years past, proposed incentives for such things as historic preservation or amateur sporting events would have faced a filibuster threat from a group of fiscally conservative Republicans in the Senate.  But the leaders of that group are gone due to term limits, and perhaps that’s why this year’s amateur sports incentives bill was allowed to receive a Senate floor vote.  State Senator Will Kraus (R, Lee’s Summit) says the atmosphere has changed.

Mo. Dept. of Transportation

Updated at 4:27 p.m.

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) has sent a letter to Illinois Governor Pat Quinn (D) asking him to join in the effort to name the under-construction Mississippi River Bridge north of downtown St. Louis after Stan Musial.  A section of the letter reads:

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Senate is wrestling with legislation that would tweak the state’s public school funding formula.

The bill is pitting rural and suburban senators against each other.  David Pearce (R, Warrensburg) chairs the Senate Education Committee and represents part of rural west central Missouri.  He sponsors the bill that would more evenly spread K-12 funding by siphoning it off from richer suburban districts, primarily those near St. Louis.

(via Flickr/Daniel Morrison)

An attempt to replace Missouri’s presidential primary with statewide caucuses has failed in the State Senate, meaning the February 7th Democratic and Republican primaries will go on as scheduled.

Before the vote, some amendments were offered, including one that would have moved the primary forward to January.  None of them passed, but they reflected efforts by several Republicans to preserve the state's primary.  State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale) said that caucuses result in fewer people having a say in who they want for president.