Fathers Support Center | St. Louis Public Radio

Fathers Support Center

Tracy White sits in front of her mother's house, where she's living after serving more than 18 years in prison.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Gun violence is the result of a series of choices, some of them spur-of-the-moment, others made after much consideration.

The vast majority of men and women in Missouri convicted of gun crimes eventually go free. Next comes navigating life with a felony record, which is a complicated process.

They often have to go back to the neighborhoods where they were arrested, making it hard to escape feuds that had them protectively carrying guns. And the lucrative world of drug dealing can be a temptation when it’s tough to find or keep a job.

Courtesy Fathers' Support Center

For 16 years, the Fathers' Support Center of St. Louis has helped fathers take a more active role in their children’s lives. The idea is to help children by helping fathers, said CEO Halbert Sullivan.

Cbabi Bayoc

When it comes to determining child custody, some say the courts favor the mother. Do they? Should they?

According to Halbert Sullivan and Lisl King Williams, Missouri courts more often give custody to mothers than to fathers, and make it especially difficult for a low income father that was never married to the mother of his child. Sullivan is the founder and CEO of the Fathers' Support Center, located in North St. Louis. Williams is the director of  legal services there.

Erin Williams

 

Ex-criminal offenders in the St. Louis region will get assistance in finding jobs through two new grants from the Department of Labor.

The Fathers' Support Center received a $1.4 million grant, and the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment is working with the Center to create more job training opportunities for former felons. The “Training to Work – Adult Reentry” grant will fund job training through Ranken Technical College.

A Father's Day to celebrate

Jun 11, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 11, 2008 - For 17 years, Lawrence Davis says, he did everything he thought a father was supposed to do.

He kept a roof over his children's heads; he fed them. He paid for their school, their clothes and their toys.