Ferguson one year later | St. Louis Public Radio

Ferguson one year later

One of the United Way of Greater St. Louis' donations in the aftermath of the events in Ferguson went to providing boxes of food to area families impacted by the unrest.
Courtesy of United Way of Greater St. Louis

Updated at 5:20 p.m. on Wed., August 19 - A detailed accounting of donations aimed at helping Ferguson shows that Emerson Electric's Charitable Trust is providing more that $8 million in mostly new funding, with major contributions also coming from the United Way of Greater St. Louis and Deaconess Foundation.

The three organizations provided St. Louis Public Radio with a clearer picture of what programs their donations supported and how funding decisions were made.

Joshura Davis joined "St. Louis on the Air" in studio.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Since last August, local business owners have provided the nation with an alternative narrative of Ferguson and neighboring Dellwood.

On a recent Saturday, Irma Moore and her daughters BreaDora, 11, Lydia, 6, Laura, 4 and Elizabeth, 7 months, visited a longtime Ferguson staple for ice cream cones.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

The first time I met the Moore family, it was in the middle of the night.

On August 17, 2014, protests in Ferguson took a violent turn. After reports of a shooting, police forced demonstrators to disperse with tear gas and rubber bullets. In her suburban home just a few blocks away, Irma Moore and her five children were huddled together on the couch, watching the events on television.

Willis Arnold / St. Louis Public Radio

This isn’t the Ferguson show.

It’s a mantra we adopted when we launched We Live Here back in February.  Now, to be clear, Ferguson is what prompted St. Louis Public Radio to start this show in the first place.  No doubt about it. But racial and economic fault lines stretch far beyond a north St. Louis County municipality with 21,000 residents.   Peering into — and exploring ways to bridge — those deep, historic divides is what this show is all about. 

A young girl walks near a memorial for Michael Brown. Hundreds of people converged near the spot where Brown was killed to honor the 18-year-old
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Sunday was the first time Erica Garner stepped foot in Ferguson.

She’s the daughter of Eric Garner, a man who was choked to death by a New York police officer. She ventured to the St. Louis region to pay tribute to Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who became a symbol for a growing movement to change policing.

Tear gas was used in Ferguson. Nov. 24 2014
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

A year after Michael Brown's death, Ferguson and the issues raised there continue to resonate far beyond St. Louis. In addition to our own reporting, we've compiled links here to some of the one-year anniversary coverage by others that you might find particularly interesting.

Michael Brown Sr, family and supporters march 4.8 miles from Ferguson to Normandy High School on Saturday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Surrounded by family, supporters and media, Michael Brown Sr. laid down a teddy bear on the middle of Canfield Dr. Saturday morning before leading the crowd on a 4.8 mile march from Ferguson to Normandy High School.  Sunday marks a year since his son, Michael Brown Jr., was shot and killed by then Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.

The length of the march was chosen as a reference to the four and a half hours Brown’s body lay on Canfield Dr. on August 9, 2014.

The makeshift memorial for VonDerrit Myers Jr. at Shaw and Klemm in south St. Louis
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

On a weekend when the major focus will be on the anniversary of the death of Michael Brown Jr. in Ferguson, several hundred people marched in south St. Louis Saturday to remember VonDerrit Myers Jr.

Fifteen-year police veteran Officer Jill Gronewald joined the Ferguson department August 24th, just weeks after Michael Brown's death by former Ferguson officer Darren Wilson.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Jill Gronewald was two weeks away from starting her new job as a Ferguson police officer when Darren Wilson, a now-former member of that same department, fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown.

St. Louis County Lt. Col. Ken Gregory talks to Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson. Ferguson Mayor James Knowles (bottom right) and Michael Brown Sr. (bottom left) along with many area leaders attended a St. Louis County NAACP brunch Friday, Aug. 7, 2015.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis County NAACP is launching two new initiatives on the eve of the first anniversary of the death of Michael Brown: one to provide free legal services to children and one to push municipalities to improve police training.

In response to a report released last week by the U.S. Department of Justice, the NAACP branch is starting a program for attorneys to represent children facing long-term school suspension or charges in the juvenile justice system on a pro-bono basis.

Click on the link below to experience One Year in Ferguson, with photos and sounds of the year in the St. Louis region since the death of Michael Brown.
Graphic by Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis region became the unexpected center of an international conversation and movement for change following the death of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014.

St. Louis Public Radio has compiled select sounds and images of the past year, highlighting moments in history and sharing voices of newsmakers and neighbors alike. 

We invite you to take some time, reflect and put on your headphones to experience One Year in Ferguson: How it Sounded. How it Looked. How it Felt.

Michael Brown, Sr., (second from the right) stands in front of the temporary memorial dedicated to his son Michael Brown, Jr. earlier this year. Brown's death had a monumental impact on the city of Ferguson -- and the St. Louis region.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On a cloudless July morning, there’s a tranquil aura around the Corner Coffee House as the clock ticks closer to the Aug. 9 anniversary of Michael Brown’s death. Daily protests have petered out and the hordes of reporters who camped out here have moved onto the next story – at least until this weekend.

But for Ferguson residents like John Powell, there is no new normal. There’s no Aug. 8. The Catholic school teacher who’s lived in Ferguson for nine years says the town he once knew will never be the same. 

Protesters on West Florissant surround a police car on August 9, 2014. Looting broke out shortly afterward.
(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Last year’s shooting death of Michael Brown was the end of a police encounter that lasted no more than five minutes.

The aftermath shook the region for weeks. In that time, hundreds of officers from police departments across the region would deploy to Ferguson under what would become known as the Unified Command.

Two members of that command -- Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol and chief Jon Belmar of the St. Louis County Police Department -- sat down to reflect on what they have learned in the past 12 months.

Clockwise from the upper left: Janice Thomas, Katie Banister, Greg Gibson and George Lenard.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 5 of 5

The death of Michael Brown at the hands of a police officer in Ferguson brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis last August. But it’s the people who live here who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has almost passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We’ve asked you a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: Did the death of Michael Brown and the related protests change your beliefs or affect your life?

Protests and chants came into the St. Louis County Council chambers Tuesday night.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

One year after Michael Brown’s death, St. Louisans are yearning for resolution. Truth is we’re nowhere close to achieving it. We can’t even be sure we’re on the right track. And yet, the anger and pain that we’ve experienced since last August have brought us to a new place. Call it the end of the beginning.

Gov. Jay Nixon announces that he has asked the state commission overseeing police officer training to update standards around tactical training, cultural competency, and officer wellness on August 6, 2015. Behind him is Mo. State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Training standards for police officers in Missouri will get an overhaul for the first time in nearly 20 years.

Gov. Jay Nixon announced Thursday that he will ask the Missouri Peace Officer Standards and Training Commission to issue new rules around tactical training, fair and impartial policing, and the well-being of officers.

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

With the clock ticking closer to the anniversary of Michael Brown’s shooting death, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch for a special edition of Politically Speaking.

Tear gas was used in Ferguson. Nov. 24 2014
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

A year after Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson and the unrest that ensued, many of the major political players continue to reassess, reappraise and reflect.

Clockwise from the upper left: John Powell, Greg Gibson, Amy Peach and George Lenard.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 4 of 5

The death of Michael Brown at the hands of a police officer in Ferguson brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis last August. But it’s the people who live in St. Louis who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has almost passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We’ll be asking you a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: Is St. Louis as a region moving in the right direction to bridge gaps of race and class? If so, how so? If not, what needs to be done differently?

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

The burned-out buildings are gone, but one year after Michael Brown’s death the scars at local businesses along West Florissant Avenue are still apparent.

At Zisser Tire & Auto Service in Dellwood there is plywood on several windows. Owner John Zisser said he’s just waiting on a city permit to change the window configuration.

A young man carries a child past boarded up businesses along West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

There are still scars in Ferguson.

One year after the protests that attracted the world’s attention, many of the damaged stores along West Florissant Road are still boarded up; trust between residents and police has frayed throughout the city; and private relationships have been strained by differences of opinion.

From left to right: Jerry Benner, Greg Gibson and Amy Peach.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 3 of 5

The police shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014 brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in St. Louis who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We’ll be asking you a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: Are the racial divides in St. Louis better or worse than they were before Aug. 9, 2014?

This photograph was published by the Kansas City Star. Jamell Spann, center, at a protest following the Aug. 9, 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown. Elizabeth Vega, right, and several of his friends try to comfort him.
Photo by Robert Cohen of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, distributed by the Associated Press and then published online by the Kansas City Star.

Following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson on Aug. 9, 2014, the world watched the aftermath of the shooting and the subsequent demonstrations and police actions through news coverage, including many stirring photographs. 

One of those photos was taken by St. Louis Post Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen. It was part of a portfolio of work that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography. The picture shows  a young man, body tensed in anguish, his face in a scream of sorrow, anger, frustration and fear. He is surrounded by other young people and one adult woman, her face grimaced with sadness, her hand on his shoulder in an attempt to comfort him. 

Felicia Shaw, new executive director of St. Louis' Regional Arts Commission, said she had a sense that this community would now "be open to change" after the events of Ferguson.
Nancy Fowler

When new Regional Arts Commission (RAC) executive director Felicia Shaw realized her job at a San Diego foundation might be eliminated, she wondered what that might mean for her life.

“I was thinking about what new direction I wanted to go in,” Shaw said. “And then, Ferguson happened.”

Embarrassment, sadness, anger and guilt

Last August, when Shaw listened to the news coming from her hometown of St. Louis, she went through a gamut of emotions: embarrassment, sadness, anger and guilt. What she heard loud and clear were the very same issues that drove her to move San Diego — more than three decades earlier.

Clockwise from upper left: Jerry Benner, Katie Banister, Dan Hyatt and Janice Thomas.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 2 of 5

The police shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014, brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in St. Louis who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We are considering a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: What still needs to happen to resolve the issues brought to light this year?

This painting of an officer and an artist wearing a "Hands Up, Don't Shoot" shirt, by Solomon Thurman, shows the thin line between police and protesters, according to gallerist Freida Wheaton.
Solomon Thurman

In a single moment and with a half-dozen gunshots, St. Louis was shaken to the core on Aug. 9.

The shooting death of Michael Brown by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson unleashed continuous waves of local and national protest that significantly shifted the St. Louis arts scene. Since then, musicians, dancers, and visual, performing and literary artists have sung and performed, and written and painted the issues revealed by the tragedy.

committee crowd at microphone
Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

A coalition of activist groups is planning a series of events this week to commemorate the first anniversary of Michael Brown Jr.’s fatal police shooting on Aug. 9, 2014.

Nearly a dozen groups are participating in the so-called “United We Fight” activities that begin Friday morning and culminate with a day of civil disobedience on Monday. 

Ferguson Historical Society

The photo is an iconic image of post-World War II America: A bustling downtown main street lined with sturdy Chevys, Fords and Chryslers. Pedestrians strolling past a hodgepodge of storefronts with flashy light-up signs: Barbays Self-Service Market, King Drugs, Florsheim shoes, Coca Cola.

 

This was Ferguson, Mo., in the late 1950s, just past the midpoint of its 120-year history.

Clockwise from the upper left: Janice Thomas, George Lenard, Greg Gibson and John Powell.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 1 of 5

The shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014, by a police officer in Ferguson brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in the St. Louis area who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has nearly passed, St. Louis Public Radio is exploring how Brown’s death affected individuals and the region as a whole. We're discussing a different question every day this week, and we invite you to join the conversation. 

Today's question: What's changed for you since the death of Michael Brown?

Clockwise from top left, Damon Davis, Freida Wheaton, Michael Castro, Brian Owens, Lee Patton Chiles, De Nichols
St. Louis Public Radio file photos

For the past year, a tragic and powerful muse has fed the energy and work of St. Louis-area artists.

The shooting death of Michael Brown and the unpeeling of issues that followed have inspired a bounty of work with a social-justice mission. As we near the Aug. 9 anniversary of Brown’s death, we talked with a number of arts professionals about their work in the wake of the turmoil: