First Amendment

Freedom Of The Press
5:07 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

Police Treatment Of Press At Ferguson Protests Spurs Request for DOJ Investigation

Credit Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

A report by the PEN America Center says an “aggressive, militarized response to largely peaceful public protests” fueled “the most serious human rights violations in Ferguson” against both protesters and the press. 

In its report, the New York-based advocacy organization for reporters and other writers says it has documented 52 alleged violations of press freedoms at the Ferguson protests in mid-August.  The report goes on to say that “those responsible for human rights abuses should be held accountable.”

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St. Louis on the Air
2:24 pm
Mon October 6, 2014

Legal Roundtable Previews Supreme Court Session

U.S. Supreme Court
Credit supremecourt.gov

The U.S. Supreme Court started its new term Monday morning by announcing it would not hear petitions related to bans on gay marriage in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. 

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Manchester protest ordinance
2:53 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Federal Appeals Court Reinstates Manchester's Funeral Protest Ban

A federal appeals court has upheld Manchester's ban on protests at funerals, which was challenged by Shirley Phelps-Roper of the Westboro Baptist Church.
(via Flickr/k763)

A federal appeals court has ruled that efforts by the city of Manchester to limit protests by the Westboro Baptist Church is constitutional, despite the fact that it limits free speech.

The ordinance, which has been amended several times, was first adopted in 2007.  The final version limits picketing or other protest activities within 300 feet of the site of any funeral or burial service within an hour before or an hour after the ceremony. There are no restrictions on picketing during processions. 

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Protest ordinance
1:21 pm
Mon August 6, 2012

Appeals court strikes down St. Louis protest ordinance

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

Updated at 8:35 p.m. with statement from city.

A federal appeals court has ruled that a St. Louis city ordinance regulating street-side protests "excessively chills free speech" because it does not make clear exactly when those protests become a traffic hazard.

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