Flanagan South Pipeline

Train tracks cross Jack Harvey's farm near Marshall. Because a railway, road, stream and wetland area will be crossed on his property, much of Flanagan South will be installed with a directional drilling method rather than trenching.
Tina Casagrand | for the Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Lisa Williams was stunned by a 4 o’clock phone call on July 26, 2010: Oil spill on an Enbridge line. Come quick. Williams, a contaminant specialist for Michigan’s U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, traveled to the incident command post two hours later. Noxious fumes hit her crossing the Kalamazoo River, two miles upstream from the spill.

(via Enbridge)

In Quincy, Ill. the Mississippi River is a popular place to go boating.

Just a few miles north of here, in another part of Adams County, Enbridge's new Flanagan South pipeline project has quietly been given the go-ahead to cross the nation’s busiest river.

The 36-inch diameter pipeline will initially carry 600,000 barrels per day of heavy crude oil primarily from Canada’s tar sands region in Alberta. Light crude from the Bakken Formation in Montana and North Dakota could also flow through it.