Flood of 1993

Family, friends and volunteers from St. Louis help Arnold, Mo. residents combat area flooding
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Patty Titus, 57, stood at the edge of the Meramec River in Arnold as it ran up the side of her house and poured into her basement. It’s the house she grew up in, and she’s lived there for more than 50 years. As Titus watched the water rise, she listed the family heirlooms she’s lost.

“All my parents stuff, dishes, furniture, lost my freezer, my refrigerator, things that can’t be replaced. A lot of memories and things,” she said.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

In the summer of 1993, flood waters from the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers broke levee after levee in the St. Louis region, covering large swathes of land, destroying property, disrupting lives and creating hazardous conditions.

MoDOT

It's been twenty years since the Great Flood of '93 swelled the Missouri River to record-high crests.  Since then, levees have been upgraded, flood preparations improved, and in a few places, communities bought out and relocated.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin visited some sites along the river in central Missouri and talked to people who battled the flood waters in 1993, and who still keep an eye on the river today:

Flooding damages north Jefferson City & triggers buyout of Cedar City

(Courtesy of the Post-Dispatch, photo by Renyold Ferguson)

Twenty years ago, the flood of 1993 changed lives up and down the Mississippi and Missouri rivers.

Fifty-five thousand homes and 33,000 businesses were destroyed. Fifty people were killed. Damages totaled in the billions.

But in the midst of the devastation, there were moments of joy, too.

For two former soldiers in the Missouri National Guard, the flood of 1993 marked the start of their lives, together.

This is their story

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

In what has become known in the St. Louis region as "The Great Flood of 1993," 20 years ago places where floodwaters had never been suddenly were underwater.  

From our archives, we offer an opportunity to go back in time with 10 stories of the rise of water, tension and even an entire town.

For some, these stories may be difficult to hear again and, for others, they will be reminders of triumph and renewal.