Flooding

Bill Greenblatt / UPI

Members of Illinois' congressional delegation say they've defeated a legislative measure that would have mandated flood insurance for individuals living behind what they called healthy flood-protection barriers.
 
U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin's office says the proposal originally was part of the National Flood Insurance Program's reauthorization bill. But federal lawmakers from Illinois say the insurance mandate was tucked into the bill with little warning.
 
Durbin says lawmakers managed to have that provision removed.
 

(Diana Fredlund/US Army Corps of Engineers)

A new report calls flood management on the Missouri River “outdated” and says it’s putting the public at risk.

The report by the environmental advocacy group American Rivers identifies the Missouri River as one of the ten most endangered in the country.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

MoDOT to work on I-64 double-deck for the rest of the year

The Missouri Department of Transportation is warning motorists that major work on the 1-64 double-deck structure in downtown will impact traffic until the end of the year.

MoDOT engineer Deanna Venker says at least one lane will be closed at all times on the structure that leads to and from the Poplar Street Bridge.

(via Flickr/USACEPublicAffairs/Jay Woods)

An increase in free space within reservoirs would not have made much of a difference in last year’s record flooding along the Missouri River, according to a report released today by the Army Corps of Engineers.   

Jody Farhat, the Corps’ Chief Water Manager for the Missouri River, says a higher amount of free space would have only reduced last year’s flooding, not prevented it.

“Due to the tremendous volume of water, we still would have had very high record releases from the reservoirs," Farhat said.  "We still would have had a significant flood event in the Missouri basin."

(Atchison Co. Emergency Management)

State and federal leaders are gathering in Columbia Saturday to talk about ways to prevent last year’s devastating floods that plagued northwest and southeastern Missouri.

Heavy snow and rainfall led to record releases from South Dakota dams along the Missouri River –and as a result 200,000 acres of farmland in northwest Missouri sat flooded for months, along with a significant stretch of Interstate 29 in Missouri and Iowa.  Around 130,000 acres were flooded in the southeast part of the state when the Army Corps of Engineers blew a hole in the Birds Point Levee along the Mississippi River in order to protect the town of Cairo, Illinois.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri is getting more than $5 million from the federal government to help in the long-term recovery for people hit by tornadoes and flooding.

The grant announced Wednesday from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will be available to help people hit by tornadoes in the Joplin and St. Louis areas, as well as flooding along the Mississippi River and in southern Missouri.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Milus and Wanda Wallace can't move heaven, but they are moving tons of earth to live once again on their "slice of heaven" in the southern section of the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway.

The Wallaces' Mississippi County farm was among the 130,000 acres of Missouri farmland inundated by floodwater in May after the Army Corps of Engineers intentionally breached the levee in three places to alleviate flooding in Cairo, Ill., and other towns along the Mississippi River.

SIUC tenure and tenure-track faculty go on strike

Three of the four Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC) unions in a contract dispute with the administration have reached a tentative agreement, avoiding a strike among non-tenure track faculty, civil service staff and graduate assistants. But one group walked off the job this morning.

Talks toward a new contract broke down last night.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District says it will be developing a new system to monitor back-up power sources at its pumping stations.

(Photo courtesy of Atchison Co. Emergency Management)

The federal government should pay 100 percent of the cost of flood damage in Missouri – according to some members of the Missouri Senate.   

Normally, the feds pick up the tab for disaster response and later bill the affected state government 25 percent of the cost.  State Senator Kurt Schaefer (R, Columbia) says Missouri should not have to pay, since the floods in the Show-Me State were the federal government’s fault.

(UPI/Tom Uhlenbrock)

Updated with comments from Schweich, statement from Nixon.

Missouri state auditor Tom Schweich has released a report that is sharply critical of Gov. Jay Nixon's decision to withhold $172  million from the current budget to help the state cope with a series of natural disasters.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) and nearly half of Missouri’s congressional delegation are pledging to rebuild levees and pursue policies that will make massive water releases from dams unnecessary in the future.

They addressed this issue at a meeting of Missouri Farm Bureau members at the State Fair in Sedalia today.

(via Flickr/USACEpublicaffairs)

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon is asking President Barack Obama to issue a major disaster declaration for 23 northern counties hit by severe storms and flooding along the Missouri River. He announced the request Monday.

The disaster request would cover events since June 1. If approved, it would allow government aid to flow to families and public agencies that have suffered losses. The counties included in the request are:

(via Flickr/jpmueller99)

Amtrak officials say full service between St. Louis and Kansas City will be restored on Wednesday, nearly a month after being disrupted due to flood waters.

Flooding along the Missouri River had forced more freight traffic onto tracks used by Amtrak’s Missouri River Runner.  Spokesman Marc Magliari says the high waters have subsided.

View University City Flood Damage in a larger map

A long-delayed buyout of 26 properties in University City that were severely damaged by flash flooding in 2008 has gotten a final level of approval.

(via Flickr/jpmueller99)

The high water that's shut down two of Amtrak's Missouri River Runner trains for more than three weeks will keep those trains off the track until at least Sunday.

Amtrak had hoped last week that the Missouri River would recede enough to restart service by tomorrow, July 19th.

(via Flickr/clip works)

Thousands of property owners facing the prospect of buying costly flood insurance as a hedge against aging levees could get a reprieve for years under a measure that has advanced in Congress.

The House on Tuesday night overwhelmingly signed off on a bill reauthorizing the debt-ridden federal flood-insurance program for five years.

(flickr/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Carlos J. Lazo)

The Missouri River Working Group is holding its first meeting on Wednesday to come up with a policy on flood control.

Missouri Senators Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill launched the group with senators from North Dakota to look for ways to improve flood control along the Missouri River and keep this year’s flooding from happening again.

(Via Flickr/USACEPublicAffairs/By Carlos J. Lazo)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is catching flak for sending out letters to farmers along the flooded Missouri River.

The letters in question are an attempt to gauge farmers' interest in selling their lands to the federal government for wildlife habitat restoration.  Farmers in Missouri and Iowa have been receiving the letters.

(via Flickr/Daniel Paquet)

Reporting by KXCV's Kirk Wayman used in this report.

Several communities up and down the swollen Missouri River are not only requesting sandbags, but vaccinations as well.

In extreme Northwest Missouri, Atchison County deputy emergency manager Mark Manchester said his office has given about 50 workers tetanus shots during the flood fight.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

The rising Missouri River has forced the suspension of some Amtrak trains between St. Louis and Kansas City.

The suspension of the Missouri River Runner will last through at least July 6. Flooding along Union Pacific tracks west of Jefferson City is forcing freight trains to use the Union Pacific route that is shared with the Missouri River Runner. 

The specific trains canceled are:

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 3:42 p.m.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has pledged an additional $100 million in state disaster aid following the deadly tornado in Joplin and continued flooding across the state.

Nixon's announcement Friday raises Missouri's total financial commitment to $150 million for a particularly devastating few months of natural disasters.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Flooding along the Mississippi River has forced the relocation of parts of this weekend's Fair St. Louis, but - good news - the water isn't expected to get any higher.

The river is expected to crest at 34 feet in St. Louis tomorrow - just four feet above flood stage.

And Army Corps St. Louis district commander Tom O'Hara says that takes into account the water still flowing into the Missouri River from dams in North and South Dakota and Montana.

(Rachel Lippmann/ St. Louis Public Radio)

The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District has decided to waive its normal $2,400 cap for damage reimbursements and will completely pay for flood damage sustained June 25 by 70 specific homes in north St. Louis.

Why waive the cap? Because the District has determined it is at fault.

Here's what happened:

(Screen capture via YouTube/139thAirliftWing)

Nixon seeks federal emergency declaration due to flooding

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon is seeking a federal emergency declaration for the state because of flooding along the Missouri River system and flash floods in the northeast.

The governor made the request yesterday in a letter to President Barack Obama. Nixon notes that the Missouri has already caused extensive flooding and is expected to threaten 25 counties in all, from the far northwest to St. Louis. He says flash floods have also affected Clark and Lewis counties in the northeastern part of the state.

(photo courtesy of MoDOT)

The moderate flooding along the Mississippi River at St. Louis is costing crews building the piers for the new bridge a couple of days of work a week.

MoDOT project manager Greg Horn said workers are still out on the piers six days a week, 20 hours a day. But the flooding - the river is about five feet above flood stage - means crews can only work at about 60 percent efficiency.

(via Flickr/NASA Earth Observatory)

The federal Environmental Protection Association says it found no evidence of serious contamination in Mississippi River water released by the May 2 breech of the Birds Point levee in southeast Missouri.

The Army Corps of Engineers blew up the levee to relieve the flooding risk to Cairo, Ill.  In doing so, it covered 130,000 acres of Missouri farmland with several feet of water.

(via Missouri Department of Transportation)

The Missouri Department of Transportation is again urging motorists to avoid eastbound Interstate 70 just north of downtown as crews continue emergency repair work on the highway.

(Photo courtesy of MoDOT)

Updated 9:30 p.m. with additional lane closures:

The Missouri Department of Transportation now says they will have to close the two right lanes of eastbound Interstate 70 at Shreve during Monday morning rush  hour to repair a collapsed sewer line. That will leave one lane open between Shreve and West Florissant. MoDOT officials are strongly urging people to avoid the area.

Our earlier story:

(U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Jay Woods)

Another Levee Breach in Northwestern Mo.

A new levee breach in northwestern Missouri threatens to close yet another section of Interstate 29.

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