Food

Cevin Lee poses with his daughter, Alana, and mother,  Phan Ly, at Hong Kong Express on South Grand Boulevard on Nov. 14, 2016.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Cevin Lee of St. Louis never meant to follow in the footsteps of his parents, who’ve run Asian restaurants for most of his life.

But a health crisis led Lee back to the family’s passion for food, and recently, to open his own restaurant, Garden on Grand, 2245 South Grand Blvd. — next door to his parents’ Hong Kong Express. It was something he once swore he’d never do.

food waste photo from Mizzou video
University of Missouri-Columbia

You have leftover French fries on one plate and leftover beef ravioli on another.

Sure, it’s not the most balanced meal, but that’s not your concern. What you want  to figure out is this: Which will have the bigger impact on the environment when you toss it into the trash? And how can that impact be reduced?

A photo of ramen noodles.
sharyn morrow | Flickr

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Chef Rob Connoley will open a St. Louis restaurant devoted to foraging in 2017.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Chef and James Beard Award Semi-Finalist Rob Connoley recently returned to his hometown of St. Louis after many years spent away in the southwestern United States. There, he became known for his skills in the art of foraging and preparing food from what he foraged.

Did you know there are over 250 varieties of garlic?
Photography-S! | Flickr

In Mark Brown’s mind, garlic is a “uniter” of people.

“Not everyone eats pork. Not everyone eats wheat or zucchini … but wherever you come from, your people, they eat garlic,” said the proprietor of Gateway Garlic Farms and the founder of St. Louis Garlic Fest, happening on Sept. 4.

The cold ramen bowl at Kounter Kulture, 3825 Watson Road.
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of August.

Catherine Klene and Heather Hughes, both managing editors at the magazine, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know.

The four restaurants they particularly suggest?

Jean Beaufort

A program started last year to make locally-produced fresh fruits and vegetables more affordable for low-income St. Louisans is planning to expand into area grocery stores.

What happens when farmers become friends with the animals they need to prepare for food?
Nina | Flickr | http://bit.ly/28NrntC

For many of us, our food arrives on a plate well-dressed and prepared for consumption. We rarely pause to think about what that plate of food was before we used it as nourishment. But for some local foodies and farmers, becoming friends with their food before they eat it is commonplace.

Eli Chen

There's a tremendous distance between where food is grown and how it travels to the dinner plate, and people living in cities often only see where the journey ends: the grocery store.

GROW, a new exhibit opening Saturday at the Saint Louis Science Center, aims to connect people to where their food comes from through a series of hands-on activities and demonstrations. The indoor and outdoor spaces take up one acre, where the Exploradome used to be, making it the largest permanent exhibit the Science Center has built since its expansion in 1991.

 

U Kitchen

If you’re searching for a way to eat freshly cooked meals without compromising quality or spending too much time at the grocery store, a local startup may have the solution. Brian Park, a recent graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, is a co-founder of U Kitchen, a new startup that seeks to bring fresh food directly to customers’ doorsteps.

Carmen Troesser | Sauce Magazine

Two St. Louis chefs are finalists in the James Beard Foundation Awards in the category of Best Chef: Midwest.

Some St. Louisans enjoy a full breakfast; others get by on coffee alone. Then there's everything in between, from rum cake to Gogurts.
Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is known for toasted Ravioli and Ted Drewes. But what do we eat for the most important meal of the day?

We at St. Louis Public Radio have become sorta-experts on what St. Louisans wake up to. That’s because when we interview people (including each other), we often begin with the question, “What did you have for breakfast?” to check our microphone levels.

Artisan bread crafted by Union Loafers, located in the Botanical Heights neighborhood of St. Louis.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

“Bread is the staff of life,” or so the Biblical saying goes, and St. Louis has a lot of restaurants and bakeries working (literally) around the clock to produce some fine loaves for locals to munch on.  Artisanal bread is considered au courant across the country right now, and Sauce Magazine recently profiled five establishments that are producing such bread in “Loaves We Love.”

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

James Beard Award-winning chef Gerard Craft is known for some of St. Louis’ most beloved restaurants which produce cutting-edge and taste-bud-tingling food. So when restaurateurs heard his newest venture was going fast-casual, they did a double-take.

Despite the initial shock, the restaurant has opened to lines out the door:

What restaurants should you try during the month of August?
Michelle Volansky | Flickr

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of February.

Catherine Klene and Heather Hughes, both managing editors at the magazine, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know.

Christina Popp of Operation Food Search extolls the virtues of turnips and rutabagas on a Cooking Matters in the Store tour at a Ferguson Shop 'n Save. Steve Weisman of St. Louis County looks on.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Christina Popp has a theory about ground beef: It’s more cost effective to purchase a leaner version because most of the fat cooks out.

The view inside Público.
Greg Rannells | Sauce Magazine

Things got a little heated in the Sauce Magazine office while putting together the most recent issue, the best new restaurants of 2015. Post-it notes were stolen; Editors got in fights; People had to return to eat delicious foods at their choice contenders time and time again—all in the name of finding the most delicious new restaurants in the area. It was for you, dear listener.

Saturday evening at a Schnucks in Des Peres.
Wayne Pratt|St. Louis Public Radio

The retail grocery industry in the St. Louis region and throughout the country is more competitive than ever.

Local chains that have been around for decades are adapting to customer expectations as they face increasing pressure from big-name national stores and even discount outlets.

Ligaya Figueras, executive editor at Sauce magazine, joined "Cityscape" for her last Sound Bites segment.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

For 14 years, Sauce magazine has provided St. Louis readers with food news, tested recipes, and reviews of the best places to shop, drink, and dine.

Working first as a freelancer, Ligaya Figueras was first published in Sauce in January 2008. She then became a staff writer—and finally, the magazine’s executive editor. In that position, she joined “Cityscape” many times for the show’s monthly Sound Bites segment, in which she explored St. Louis dining with the people who know it best.

Gerard Craft throws a pizza crust at Pastaria
Greg Rannells

Local restaurateur Gerard Craft has long been a bridesmaid in the pursuit of a coveted James Beard Award. Now he’s the bride. After six years as a nominee, Craft won the "Best Chef: Midwest" award in a Monday night gala in Chicago.

Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon | File photo

A team of 17 cancer experts assembled by the World Health Organization has ruled the most commonly used herbicide a “probable carcinogen.”

Northwestern University communications and psychology professor Ellen Wartella
Courtesy Webster University

The Institute of Medicine first rang the alarm bells about childhood obesity in 2004, when a study found that obesity rates had more than doubled among children in the previous 30 years. At that time, they identified that about one-third of American children were either obese or overweight, and two-thirds of adults were obese or overweight. The question became why.

chef taste 2014
Provided by Taste of St. Louis

Taste of St. Louis begins today and closes Sunday. This year, the festival announced a change in location from downtown St. Louis to Chesterfield. The event’s relocation has been a hot-button issue for some St. Louis residents. Former school teacher  and lifelong Ferguson resident Jerry Benner, 70, believes the change redefined the event.

“It’s not taste St. Louis. It’s taste of Chesterfield,” Benner said.

Chesterfield and St. Louis
(Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis Bluesweek Festival and the Budweiser Taste of St. Louis are on the move, and people throughout the metro area have been quick to share their reactions.

Taste of St. Louis and Bluesweek left many regulars reeling after organizers announced that this year both will be held in Central Park and the Chesterfield amphitheater.

St. Louis Art Museum, looking to the west
Provided by the Art Museum

Visitors to the St. Louis Art Museum will see some changes in the museum's Panorama restaurant.

The museum is looking closely at the menu, service and kitchen operations after a six-month review observed a $260,000 loss. The red ink was noted in a Zoo-Museum District audit of the museum, released last week.

(via Flickr/uberculture)

Meat eaters are flush with choices in St. Louis, we know.  But just how "meaty" is St. Louis among the top 100 most populous U.S. cities?

Real Estate blog Movoto has put together such a list and slots St. Louis among its Top 10.

We're solidly in the middle at number 5. The list used the following criteria:

Herman Smith, Bryant Kirby and Robert Redmond hold a sack of produce for distribution to coop members.
Robert Joiner | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon:Yvette Batey was among those who showed up Saturday to shop at a new food co-op organized by Central Baptist Church in midtown St. Louis.  She left with a generous supply of  fruits and vegetables, including plutos and peaches, corn and cauliflower, and sounded delighted that her bill for two weeks’ worth of produce came to only $23.50.

“I live about 10 blocks from here and I had to take a bus,” says Batey, “but it is very convenient to have access to so many fruits and vegetables so close to my home.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Chances are, a university would not be the first location you’d think about if you were setting up a food pantry to assist the needy in the farm belt of the Midwest.

So hats off to a group of enterprising students at the University of Missouri at Columbia who recognized that there were members of their campus community who couldn’t afford to buy food -- and then did something about it. The student-run Tiger Pantry, which opened its doors on campus last fall, has provided free food to 1,300 needy students and employees so far this year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Botanical Garden pulses with green life: plants, flowers, trees, fruits, herbs and vegetables. Visits to the vast space feel peaceful, but the gardens themselves are also purposeful. They're not just lovely, they're useful and necessary.

That idea runs through the garden's year-long series, Foodology.

Fran Collin

UC Berkeley Journalism Professor Michael Pollan has devoted a good deal of his career to examining the food we eat in today’s society and the hazards of much of it.  Four of his books are New York Times Bestsellers and have received many other accolades: Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals and The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World.

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