Francis Slay

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Opponents of a proposed $250,000 consulting contract between the city of St. Louis water department and the French utility company Veolia call the latest move in the saga by Mayor Francis Slay “political chicanery."

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

Big political weight was behind two NorthSide Regeneration bills that went before a St. Louis aldermanic committee Tuesday morning, but no vote was taken after four aldermen failed to attend.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay introduced Mayor Francis Slay at his fourth-term inauguration, the St. Louis Democrat pledged to help make "the NorthSide Regeneration project a great success."

Clay called developer Paul McKee’s controversial and long-delayed plan "an opportunity to infuse millions of dollars in job-creating developments into a neighborhood that has been disinvested, underserved and under-appreciated for decades."

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Kids with robots will continue coming to St. Louis for the next few years. FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) announced today that the world finals of its robotics competition will take place in St. Louis from 2015 to 2017.

The international competition has been held in St. Louis for the last three years and is scheduled to remain here next year, as well. Today’s announcement guarantees that the championship will return to St. Louis for the next three years after that.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.  

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Urban Crime Summit organized by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster came to St. Louis Wednesday.

The four-day gathering of law enforcement and criminology experts began in Kansas City Monday and is scheduled to continue at Saint Louis University’s School of Law through Thursday.

In his opening remarks, Koster told those gathered that 105 murders in Kansas City last year and 113 in St. Louis were too many.

"The fact that we are here is a statement that we do not accept this violence as the status quo," he said.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley made a point earlier this summer to note that his friendship with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay went beyond politics.

“[People will say] Charlie, Mayor Slay is your political friend. No he’s not,” Dooley said during a speech in June. “He is just my friend. He’s my friend. And that’s what I want you to understand. This is in our best interest. He wants St. Louis City to be successful. I want St. Louis County to be successful.

"Together, we want to the St. Louis region to be all that it can be,” he added.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Just months after his record-setting re-election, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay appears to have amassed another hefty campaign bank account that’s among the largest for top Missouri Democrats.

Lambert Upgrading Vehicle Fleet To Run On Natural Gas

Jun 6, 2013
Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Lambert St. Louis Airport is upgrading the way it fuels its fleet of vehicles. Monday the Laclede Group and Siemens held a groundbreaking for a new natural gas fueling station at the airport.

The station will serve 160 fleet vehicles that run on compressed natural gas - a fuel that's considerably cheaper than gasoline.

Laclede Group CEO Suzanne Sitherwood says the station will also be available for the public to use.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay cleared his schedule Wednesday to hit the road to Jefferson City in a last-ditch effort to get some favored legislation – notably, tax credits – approved before the session ends at 6 p.m. Friday.

Although two days are left, Slay's chief of staff Jeff Rainford said that Wednesday was realistically the last day to wield any influence in the state Capitol.

St. Louis Summer Jobs Program Targets Youth Crime

May 13, 2013
Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is asking the business community to step up to help fight crime in the city.

Slay says finding jobs for at-risk teens is the best way to keep them out of trouble.

The goal is to create 500, 8-week summer jobs for young people ages 16 to 23 in two pilot areas in North and South St. Louis.

The test neighborhoods in question have high populations of young people who face significant academic and social challenges.

Slay Says STL-TV Is Luxury City Can't Afford

May 12, 2013
St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will resume discussions next week of the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The budget presented to the board by Mayor Francis Slay totals $985 million.

Among the cuts to the budget that Slay is proposing includes essentially eliminating the city’s cable TV channel, known as STL-TV.

The cut was rejected by the board of estimate and apportionment, but Slay says he remains confident that the Board of Aldermen will see that STL-TV is a luxury the city can’t afford.

(ABS Consulting)

Updated at 2:15 p.m. May 6 with official emergency declaration.

St. Louis's building commissioner has ordered the immediate removal of Cupples 7 due to "significant hazards that pose an immediate and imminent danger to the public health, safety and welfare."

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis mayor Francis Slay says he's approaching his historic fourth term with "hope and optimism."

Slay and Comptroller Darlene Green took their oaths of office just after noon today at City Hall. He's the first mayor elected to a fourth, four-year term and will become the longest-serving in the city's history at the end of the month. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: After being sworn in for a historic fourth term, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay pledged to pursue his work with “hope – and with a sense of great urgency.”

Both Slay and St. Louis Comptroller Darlene Green were sworn in on Tuesday for four-year terms. Slay made history earlier this month when he won the general election to a fourth four-year term. 

Slay effectively won his latest term in March when he defeated St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmy Matthews. He then easily won his general election campaign over Green Party nominee James McNeely.

(via Flickr/Roomic Cube)

Possession of small amounts of marijuana would, under some circumstances be handled by city prosecutors under legislation sent to Mayor Francis Slay today.

Under Ald. Shane Cohn's legislation, first and second-time offenders carrying less than 35 grams of pot would automatically receive a citation and face a maximum $500 fine. It would not apply to those with recent felony convictions, with two or more misdemeanor possession convictions, or if the marijuana possession is part of another crime.

(UPI file photo)

Later this month, on April 27, St. Louis mayor Francis Slay will become the longest-serving mayor in the city’s history.

With more than 81 percent of the vote, Slay won his fourth term as mayor yesterday, besting a candidate from the Green Party, and prior, defeating two primary challengers including Board of Alderman president Lewis Reed.

“I love this city dearly and I really love the people more than anything,” Slay told host Don Marsh.  “I like what I do and I’ve got a good team and I’m looking forward to the next four years.”

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis mayor Francis Slay made history last night.

Final unofficial results show him winning a fourth, four-year term with more than 81 percent of the vote. Other mayors have served more terms, but they were just a year long. On April 27, Slay will become the longest-serving mayor in the city's history. 

"Winning the fourth term is not the history," Slay told a crowd of friends, family and supporters on Tuesday night. "What we do with the fourth term is."  

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Area voters on Tuesday selected new mayors in Clayton, Fenton and Chesterfield, and sided with incumbents in Normandy and Valley Park.

The contest in Clayton, St. Louis County's seat, was particularly tight, with former Alderman Harold Sanger edging out two current aldermen: Michelle Harris and Alex Berger III.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

From a podium at Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis, Democratic Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman asked a crowd of gun-control supporters to hold up their phones and punch in a new contact, the switchboard for the U.S. Senate.

She told them to call every day, ask for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and demand that they vote in favor of universal background checks for gun sales.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: The results from the mayoral primary are in. Why did Reed lose? Did Slay win by as much as he had hoped? Then Jo shares some stories from Democrat Days and we close it out with Lt. Governor Peter Kinder's lawsuit.

Slay Poised To Make History

Mar 6, 2013
Mayor Slay.
Bill Greenblatt / UPI

Francis Slay is now poised to win a fourth term as mayor of St. Louis.

Slay walked away with the Democratic primary on Tuesday, beating Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.   Slay received 54 percent of the vote, Reed 44 percent and Matthews a little over one percent.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis voters go to the polls today to decide whether incumbent Mayor Francis Slay deserves a fourth term.

Today's municipal primary was expected to decide who will be mayor. No Republicans were running, and the Democratic nominee will be heavily favored over Green Party candidate James Eldon McNeely.

Candidate Profiles

Slay Seeking Unprecedented Fourth Four-Year Term

Mar 4, 2013
(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

If incumbent mayor Francis Slay wins the Democratic primary tomorrow and then goes on to win re-election in April, he will become the longest serving mayor in St. Louis history.

Serving over 12 years in the office, Slay believes there are many reasons he deserves an unprecedented fourth four-year term.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: photo-baum's on mayoral flyers, Shane Schoeller as the new executive director of the Missouri GOP, and the back and forth between Senator Claire McCaskill and newly-elected Congresswoman Ann Wagner on the Violence Against Women Act.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Mayor Francis Slay has unveiled the first-ever sustainability plan for the city of St. Louis.

Slay and his so-called "Vanguard Cabinet" of young city residents developed the plan with community input over the last two years.

It includes 29 immediate action items to be completed by or around 2018. Among them:

(via Flickr/pasa47)

St. Louis officials say a new federal grant could enable them to end long-term homelessness in the city in 18 months.

The city announced today that it had received $1.25 million to provide services like rental assistance, substance abuse and mental health treatment, and other support for those who have been living on the street long-term. 

Previous federal grants could only be used for specific populations, says human services director Bill Siedhoff. The new federal money will provide those critical support services to a broader population.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Chart updated at 2:24 to reflect most recent 24 and 48 hour campaign filings.

A week out from the Democratic mayoral primary, incumbent Mayor Francis Slay is maintaining his large financial advantage over challenger and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed.

According to campaign finance reports filed Monday evening, in a month long span from Jan. 20 to Feb. 21, Slay spent $479,291. During that same amount of time, Reed spent only a fraction of that at $88,470.

St. Louis City, County, Team Up On Economic Development

Feb 22, 2013
Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

After decades and decades of competing against each other for jobs, St. Louis City and County announced on Friday, a decision to partner up to attract new companies.

The proposal, called the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, would merge two agencies—The St. Louis Development Corporation in the city, and the St. Louis County Economic Development Council, under one roof.

Mayor Francis Slay says the move will create a sense of regionalism that has been lacking in economic development.

Flickr | alancleaver_2000

Quite a bit - city leaders say.

Crews from four St. Louis city departments are flooding a north city neighborhood this week in an ongoing effort to tackle its crime problem.

The influx of resources from the streets, building, forestry and health departments follows two weeks of stepped-up police presence known as “hot-spot policing."