Francis Slay

(Kate Essig/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis turns 250 in 2014, and to celebrate, stl250 has planned an entire year of birthday celebrations. On Monday, the volunteer led non-profit announced the final plans for its signature events. 

The birthday celebration begins on New Years Eve at Grand Center's First Night, where attendees can celebrate by making birthday hats, recording birthday wishes and decorating cupcakes.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - When Better Together, a group tasked with studying a potential reunion between St. Louis and St. Louis County, launched last week, there was a lot of talk about the “lines” dividing the region.

Mayor Francis Slay said that few people cared if they “were crossing the line” while staying in the Cheshire Inn, a hotel straddling the city-county border. But, he later said, “the line does exist and many other lines exist as well.”

(Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Beacon)

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics. Pinch-hitting for Chris this week was St. Louis Public Radio's Rachel Lippmann.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The chief executives of St. Louis and St. Louis County helped kickstart an endeavor to gather data -- and public input -- that could lead to a potential reunion of the two jurisdictions.

(Flickr Creative Commons User Daniel Leininger)

A new coalition called Better Together launched an effort today Tuesday to study whether St. Louis city and county should re-unite.

Yet coalition members were quick to explain they’re not advocating for a merger.

"We are not advocating reentry. We’re not advocating merger," said former Ambassador George Herbert Walker III, who is chairman of the group. "We’re just saying let’s get all the data together and then as a group decide what is best for St. Louis and the city of St. Louis at this time."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - In recent years, various officials and civic denizens have debated changes to governmental organization in St. Louis. Beginning in 1949, there have been efforts to streamline the table of organization and end a weak mayor system. Major charter changes put before the voters all failed, save one. And we’ll get to that in a little bit. Other changes occurred because of state legislative action or referenda.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated with additional quotes.

The French utility company Veolia has decided not to go forward with a $250,000 contract that would have reviewed the operations of the city of St. Louis water department.

Opponents of the company had raised questions about Veolia's corporate behavior and environmental record.

Mary Ellen Ponder, the deputy chief of staff to Mayor Francis Slay, announced the company's decision today at a committee hearing on a bill that would have stripped the funding for the contract from the budget for this year.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The chair of St. Louis city’s budget committee has launched an effort to strip the funding for a controversial consulting contract with the French utility company Veolia.

(Via Wikimedia Commons)

A lot has changed in the world of baseball since 1946. But a familiar pair of elite teams are once again playing in the Fall Classic.  For the fourth time, the St. Louis Cardinals are facing off against the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Previous matchups took place in 1946, 1967 and 2004.

And this year's matchup has some striking similarities to the team's first meeting in 1946. Then, as now, St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in playoffs before facing off against the Red Sox.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Opponents of a proposed $250,000 consulting contract between the city of St. Louis water department and the French utility company Veolia call the latest move in the saga by Mayor Francis Slay “political chicanery."

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

Big political weight was behind two NorthSide Regeneration bills that went before a St. Louis aldermanic committee Tuesday morning, but no vote was taken after four aldermen failed to attend.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay introduced Mayor Francis Slay at his fourth-term inauguration, the St. Louis Democrat pledged to help make "the NorthSide Regeneration project a great success."

Clay called developer Paul McKee’s controversial and long-delayed plan "an opportunity to infuse millions of dollars in job-creating developments into a neighborhood that has been disinvested, underserved and under-appreciated for decades."

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Kids with robots will continue coming to St. Louis for the next few years. FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) announced today that the world finals of its robotics competition will take place in St. Louis from 2015 to 2017.

The international competition has been held in St. Louis for the last three years and is scheduled to remain here next year, as well. Today’s announcement guarantees that the championship will return to St. Louis for the next three years after that.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.  

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Urban Crime Summit organized by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster came to St. Louis Wednesday.

The four-day gathering of law enforcement and criminology experts began in Kansas City Monday and is scheduled to continue at Saint Louis University’s School of Law through Thursday.

In his opening remarks, Koster told those gathered that 105 murders in Kansas City last year and 113 in St. Louis were too many.

"The fact that we are here is a statement that we do not accept this violence as the status quo," he said.

Lambert Upgrading Vehicle Fleet To Run On Natural Gas

Jun 6, 2013
Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Lambert St. Louis Airport is upgrading the way it fuels its fleet of vehicles. Monday the Laclede Group and Siemens held a groundbreaking for a new natural gas fueling station at the airport.

The station will serve 160 fleet vehicles that run on compressed natural gas - a fuel that's considerably cheaper than gasoline.

Laclede Group CEO Suzanne Sitherwood says the station will also be available for the public to use.

St. Louis Summer Jobs Program Targets Youth Crime

May 13, 2013
Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is asking the business community to step up to help fight crime in the city.

Slay says finding jobs for at-risk teens is the best way to keep them out of trouble.

The goal is to create 500, 8-week summer jobs for young people ages 16 to 23 in two pilot areas in North and South St. Louis.

The test neighborhoods in question have high populations of young people who face significant academic and social challenges.

Slay Says STL-TV Is Luxury City Can't Afford

May 12, 2013
St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will resume discussions next week of the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The budget presented to the board by Mayor Francis Slay totals $985 million.

Among the cuts to the budget that Slay is proposing includes essentially eliminating the city’s cable TV channel, known as STL-TV.

The cut was rejected by the board of estimate and apportionment, but Slay says he remains confident that the Board of Aldermen will see that STL-TV is a luxury the city can’t afford.

(ABS Consulting)

Updated at 2:15 p.m. May 6 with official emergency declaration.

St. Louis's building commissioner has ordered the immediate removal of Cupples 7 due to "significant hazards that pose an immediate and imminent danger to the public health, safety and welfare."

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis mayor Francis Slay says he's approaching his historic fourth term with "hope and optimism."

Slay and Comptroller Darlene Green took their oaths of office just after noon today at City Hall. He's the first mayor elected to a fourth, four-year term and will become the longest-serving in the city's history at the end of the month. 

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