Francis Slay

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A Missouri House committee heard testimony Monday on legislation that would make cuts to the pension system for St. Louis firefighters.

The bill would not go as far as a proposal made by Mayor Francis Slay:  Among the differences, Slay’s plan would have all firefighters put 9 percent of their salaries into the system, and new hires would not get any of that money back upon retirement.  The bill in the State House would have new firefighters put in 8 percent, and upon retirement would get back 25 percent of what they paid in.  F.I.R.E. Chairman and St. Louis firefighter Abram Pruitt, Junior, traveled to Jefferson City to support the bill.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

All sides involved in the effort to bring down the cost of pensions for firefighters in the city of St. Louis say negotiations are going well.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The dispute over the best way to reduce the cost of firefighter pensions in the city of St. Louis continued on Friday, with Lewis Reed, the president of the Board of Aldermen, laying out his plan.

Reed, whose Twitter feed tracked the progress of a Thursday late-night meeting among himself, firefighters, and selected aldermen, says his plan will reduce the city's required contribution into the Fireman's Retirement System for next year by $7.6 million. Reed unveiled the plan at a City Hall news conference Friday.

IMAGE IS ONLY 200 pixels Careful.  Eddie Roth
Office of Mayor Francis Slay

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay has appointed Eddie Roth as the city's new director of public safety.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The political fight raging over Mayor Francis Slay’s efforts to reform the pension system for St. Louis city firefighters continued at City Hall Friday.

The dispute started last week when board president Lewis Reed refused to assign the bills to a committee. Reed contends the board's rules give him until next Friday, Feb. 25, to make a decision.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Though they had no legislation to officially consider, members of the Public Employees Committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen spent almost three hours today discussing proposed changes to the pension system for the city's firefighters.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 12:20 p.m. with comments from the firefighters union.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. with timeframe, and more comments from Mayor Slay and the union.

Saying the current system is financially unsustainable and could result in huge reductions to city services, Mayor Francis Slay has officially unveiled his plan to change pensions for the St. Louis city firefighters.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and other local leaders are endorsing Susan Montee in her campaign for Lieutenant Governor. None of the four Democrats in the race for the office are from St. Louis -- Missouri's largest voting bloc. Thus, Montee's endorsement from St. Louis city officials gives her a strong lead as she seeks the nomination.

Montee, the former state auditor, kicked off her campaign at St. Louis City Hall Tuesday saying she knows how to fight for veterans and seniors.

Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and the St. Louis Police Officers Association are throwing their support behind a voter's initiative proposal that would give St. Louis direct control of its police department.

The Safer Missouri Citizens Coalition is seeking 100,000 signatures by May sixth to put the proposal on this November's ballot. Jeff Roorda, business manager for the St. Louis Police Officers' Association, said opponents who argue the bill would limit public oversight and access to records are misleading the public.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis city and St. Louis County officials say they've gotten federal approval that will help local companies compete in the global market. The area's Foreign Trade Zone has expanded to include all of St. Louis County and City.

The expanded zone will allow more local manufacturing and distribution companies to import goods duty-free and avoid other customs fees.

Mayor Francis Slay announced the expansion at Sunset Transportation in south St. Louis. Slay says the approval from the US Department of Commerce also streamlines the time it takes for businesses to qualify.

(via Google Maps screen capture)

Don't panic if you see a fire in Forest Park tomorrow afternoon.

Weather permitting, Forest Park Forever, and the city's parks and fire departments will conduct a 14-acre controlled burn in the Deer Lake Natural Area, near the Union Ave. entrance to the park.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A federal judge in St. Louis has rejected attempts of Occupy St. Louis protestors to re-establish their encampment in Kiener Plaza.

Attorneys for the protestors, who were evicted from the park early Saturday morning, had asked Judge Carol Jackson to stop enforcement of the city's parks curfew until the case went to trial. Jackson denied that request saying the protestors had not proven they were highly likely to win if the case went to trial.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis Police Officers Association announced today that the organization and the mayor of the city of St. Louis, Francis Slay, have come to a compromise regarding a local control ballot initiative.

The issue of local control of the St. Louis Police Department, that is, shifting the control of the department from the state of Missouri to the city of St. Louis, was a fixture in this past year's legislative session.

(via OccupySTL Facebook Page)

Updated 3:28 p.m. to reflect later time of enforcement

Occupy St. Louis has now announced via Twitter and Facebook that the time of enforcement is now 3 p.m. Friday. According to the group's Facebook page, city officials delivered two notices to the group, one of which lists the new time.

Original Story

(via Facebook/Occupy St. Louis)

Anti-Wall Street protestors who have camped in Kiener Plaza for more than a month are blasting Mayor Francis Slay for "heed[ing] the complaints of the corporate groups who control the city" and calling for their ouster from the park."

(via OccupySTL Facebook Page)

Even as it launched three simultaneous protests against Bank of American in downtown St. Louis today, OccupySTL may lose its home base soon.

The protestors have been camping at the west end of Kiener Plaza for several weeks, including the Major League Baseball playoffs and a visit to the area by Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden.

During an appearance earlier this week on St. Louis on the Air, Mayor Francis Slay hinted that the city would soon move to take action.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Mayor Francis Slay is fuming over the results of the just-concluded special session.

"Goodbye state legislators. Thanks for (almost) nothing," the mayor tweeted this afternoon, a day after the state Senate adjourned without taking action on a large economic development package and a measure that would end more than 150 years of state oversight of the St. Louis police department.

(via Flickr/dyobmit)

Updated at 1:46 p.m. to include Clay/Barton wager.

If you'll pardon the gastronomical puns, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Jake Wagman tells us today about a tasty World Series side bet between St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and Arlington, Texas Mayor Robert Cluck.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Word has come this morning of the death of Anna May Slay, the mother of St. Louis mayor Francis G. Slay.

The mayor's press secretary Kara Bowlin released the information to the media and said that Slay's death "follows a long illness and was not unexpected."

Bowlin also said that the mayor and other family members were with Slay when she died, and that she was "a sweet, quiet woman with a core of steel" and "a staff favorite."

Arrangements for Slay are pending and we will update this post with more information as we know it.

A preliminary review of the St. Louis corrections department finds "numerous weaknesses" in the management, physical structure and operations of the two jails the department oversees.

Six inmates have escaped from the facilities in the last 15 months. Three of the four escapes took place within five months of each other.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Slay hopeful Mo. lawmakers agree to tax credits

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay remains hopeful that Missouri lawmakers will agree to tax credits to help develop an international air cargo hub at Lambert Airport, even as the effort appears to be stalled. Slay told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that the job-creation potential is simply too great to give up on.

Slay says the major problem lawmakers have with the proposal is the issue of expiration dates for some tax credits.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

Four jail breaks in 15 months make the city of St. Louis look like a joke.

That was the general consensus of members of the Public Safety committee  on Wednesday following two hours of testimony on the rash of escapes.

(photo courtesy of the city of St. Louis)

Ald. April Ford-Griffin, who took over as chairman of the St. Louis city budget committee this year, is leaving the aldermanic chambers for the Mayor's office.

Mayor Francis Slay announced on Friday that Ford-Griffin, who has served as the Fifth Ward alderwoman since 1997, will be the new director of the city's Civil Rights Enforcement Agency, which Slay called a "vitally important agency." The former director, Ruby L. Bonner, retired on July 1.

(Flickr/Missouri Department of Transportation)

Metro-East contractors delay Mississippi River bridge protest

According to the Belleville News-Democrat, about 200 protesters gathered at the East St. Louis City Hall early this morning, but delayed a protest to shut down work on the new Mississippi River Bridge. The newspaper reports Illinois Governor Pat Quinn promised to call and the state’s transportation secretary is heading to the city to meet them.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Saying they could not in good conscience declare that the city of St. Louis is in a fiscal crisis when it had a budget surplus last year, two members of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment on Wednesday forced a delay on implementing a third year of furloughs for city employees.

(via Flickr/Ian Sane)

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay will travel to the Sunshine State (that's Florida) this weekend to accept the United States Chess Federation's "Chess City of the Year" award for our own Mound City.

This is the second time St. Louis has received the designation - the city also won the award in 2009.

The award, according to the the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, "recognizes the U.S. city that has done the most to promote and further the game of chess, both locally and nationally."

Maria Altman / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis will have four new charter schools when school begins in a few weeks.

The mayor was on hand when the latest school, Better Learning Communities Academy, announced Wednesday it’s enrolling students.

Mayor Francis Slay has endorsed all four of the charters opening this year.

At the same time he says some of the St. Louis Public Schools are working. 

Local control of SLMPD by next year

Jul 20, 2011
Bill Greenblat / UP

According to St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, by this time next year the city could have control of its own police force for the first time since the Civil War.

The announcement came on Wednesday in tandem with an agreement on an package of economic development incentives.

Both issues will be taken up during a special legislative session later this summer.

Slay says the agreement has cleared the way for passage of local control, which now has the backing of the Republican-controlled state House and Senate

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A measure that local preservationists worry could lead to the demolition of the UFO-shaped former home of Del Taco on Grand Ave. is on its way to the mayor's desk.

(via Flickr/raleighwoman)

An "angry and frustrated" St. Louis mayor Francis Slay is responding to last weekend's rash of car break-ins with proposed new rules for the owners of downtown lots.

Vandals broke into at least 60 cars in the downtown St. Louis area Friday night, stealing purses and GPS units. Police say there were no attendants at some of the lots to report the crimes. And Slay wants that to stop.

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