Francis Slay

Flickr | alancleaver_2000

Quite a bit - city leaders say.

Crews from four St. Louis city departments are flooding a north city neighborhood this week in an ongoing effort to tackle its crime problem.

The influx of resources from the streets, building, forestry and health departments follows two weeks of stepped-up police presence known as “hot-spot policing."

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 10:03 with the Kwame Building Group's response.

In a late afternoon press conference Thursday, Board of Alderman President and mayoral candidate Lewis Reed accused incumbent Mayor Francis Slay of engaging in a "pay-to-play" system where businesses seeking construction contracts have to first make a donation to the mayor's campaign. The mayor's staff insisted that there are too many safeguards for this to even be possible.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

At Monday's forum, the three Democratic candidates made their case for why they should be St. Louis' next mayor. Incumbent mayor Francis Slay is seeking an unprecedented fourth four-year term, while the other two candidates argued it was time for someone else to take the reins.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 12:45 p.m. following forum - more to come.

Today, "St. Louis on the Air" hosted its St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum.

(For a full report of the event, see our Chris McDaniel's story here)

(via Flickr/Richie Diesterheft)

The three candidates for the Democratic nomination for St. Louis mayor will take part in a one-hour town hall forum today. 

St. Louis Public Radio will air the forum, which is the second gathering of the candidates ahead of the March 5th primary election.

In liberal territory like St. Louis, the winner of the Democratic primary in March immediately becomes the presumptive favorite to win the general election on April 2nd.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Today on "St. Louis on the Air," we announced that we'll be hosting the St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum.  Here are some of the details:

Mayoral Debate Contentious In Downtown Forum

Jan 30, 2013
Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

At a mayoral debate showcasing the three Democrats vying for the position in the March 5 primary, challenger and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed wasted no time before going after his opponent.

Crime was by far the most contentious issue in the forum that filled two overflow rooms and was standing room only. Several times at the debate, Reed interrupted incumbent Mayor Francis Slay when he was talking about the city's lowering crime rate.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Last week, St. Louis Public Radio took a look at how much money the mayoral candidates have amassed, and where that money is coming from. Today we're looking at how that money is being spent.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Updated 3:43 with Mayor Slay's more recent ad (that is televised).

A little more than a month away from the Democratic primary, challenger Lewis Reed is losing the fundraising battle miserably.

According to Tuesday's campaign finance filings, incumbent Mayor Francis Slay spent nearly a million dollars in the month of January in his campaign to be re-elected.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

St. Louis Mayoral candidate Lewis Reed is accusing Mayor Francis Slay of campaigning at the expense of taxpayers.

Reed, President of the Board of Aldermen, alleges Slay is holding meetings with city employees to campaign for votes while they are on the clock. Glenn Burleigh, Reed’s campaign manager, claims it’s a coordinated effort aimed at multiple departments.

“Telling folks on taxpayer dime: that’s what’s important here," Burleigh said. "These are trash collectors, that instead of picking up trash, were listening to the mayor.”

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Tensions between the two main Democrats running for mayor of St. Louis were on broad display today during a dispute over who should negotiate contracts with St. Louis city employees.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

A federal grant of $4.2 million has been awarded to the Missouri Department of Mental Health, which will spend the money on kids in north St. Louis.

The money will be used for a variety of mental health services, including screenings and assessments for children, as well as home visitations to teach skills to parents.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said north St. Louis was chosen for a reason.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

At the St. Louis Business Journal's "State of St. Louis," one of the panelists remarked that, in the Missouri legislature, the divide is less between Republicans and Democrats and more between rural and urban representation.

But the upcoming legislative session is somewhat remarkable because both leaders in the legislative bodies are from the St. Louis area. House Speaker Tim Jones is from Eureka, and Senate Majority Leader Tom Dempsey from St. Charles will soon be the President Pro Tem.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

St. Louis's Democratic battle between incumbent Mayor Francis Slay and Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed is now official -- both candidates filed for the March primary this morning.

Slay has never lost a race, and he's taking this challenge seriously. In fact, Slay says he's had paid employees and volunteers standing in line to hold his spot for filing since Sept. 24.

Slay says he wants another term in order to continue improving education and public safety in the city, and points to the recent passage of local control of the police department.

(via Peter Raack)

Baseball bets are not usually something we cover much of here at St. Louis Public Radio (except when we make it to the World Series and make a chart of all the bets).

However, we thought we'd make an exception today to highlight something happening in the nation's capitol.

(via Flickr/taberandrew)

A restraining order that prevents St. Louis County from enforcing a new law that would require banks to offer mediation to homeowners facing foreclosure continues this week.

St. Louis County and bankers are in the midst of a legal battle over whether or not the county has the authority to enforce the ordinance.

No matter what happens in the court case, St. Louis City Mayor Francis Slay says the city should continue to push ahead with a similar law.

(via Flickr/alkruse24)

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced Thursday that three new charter schools will open next fall.

That will bring to 18 the number of schools that have gone through the screening process put in place by the mayor's office.

The mayor says quality education is critical to keeping families in the city.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Updated to note that Slay filed multiple reports, and thus raised and spent more than quarterly report reflected.

The latest quarterly reports are in for the 2013 mayoral primary in the city of St. Louis, and incumbent Mayor Francis Slay continues to hold a huge fundraising advantage over challenger Lewis Reed, the Board of Aldermen president.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Not many people who watch city politics were surprised when Board of Alderman president Lewis Reed announced that he will challenge Mayor Francis Slay in next year’s Democratic primary in April.

Reed officially threw his hat into the ring on Wednesday at Sqwires in Lafayette Square, part of his ward before he ran for board president.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 1:50 with comments from Mayor Slay.

The long-rumored Democratic rumble for mayor of St. Louis is on. 

Board of Aldermen president Lewis Reed officially threw his hat into the ring today in a press conference at Sqwires in Lafayette Square, part of his ward before he ran for board president.

This campaign is a "mission of change," Reed told his supporters, calling Slay an ineffective leader more interested in photo ops and managing the media than with bringing people together to solve the city's problems.

Lafayette Square, he said, was improved through cooperation. Ineffective leadership has stifled similar efforts citywide.

"We can accept those things that divide us, or we can work toward a common purpose to improve our communities," Reed said. "We can continue to develop reactionary policies, or we can bring the brightest minds together to develop long-term strategies to turn St. Louis into a world-class destination."

Here are some highlights from Reed's announcement:

Pages