Francis Slay

(via Flickr/Roomic Cube)

Possession of small amounts of marijuana would, under some circumstances be handled by city prosecutors under legislation sent to Mayor Francis Slay today.

Under Ald. Shane Cohn's legislation, first and second-time offenders carrying less than 35 grams of pot would automatically receive a citation and face a maximum $500 fine. It would not apply to those with recent felony convictions, with two or more misdemeanor possession convictions, or if the marijuana possession is part of another crime.

(UPI file photo)

Later this month, on April 27, St. Louis mayor Francis Slay will become the longest-serving mayor in the city’s history.

With more than 81 percent of the vote, Slay won his fourth term as mayor yesterday, besting a candidate from the Green Party, and prior, defeating two primary challengers including Board of Alderman president Lewis Reed.

“I love this city dearly and I really love the people more than anything,” Slay told host Don Marsh.  “I like what I do and I’ve got a good team and I’m looking forward to the next four years.”

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis mayor Francis Slay made history last night.

Final unofficial results show him winning a fourth, four-year term with more than 81 percent of the vote. Other mayors have served more terms, but they were just a year long. On April 27, Slay will become the longest-serving mayor in the city's history. 

"Winning the fourth term is not the history," Slay told a crowd of friends, family and supporters on Tuesday night. "What we do with the fourth term is."  

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

From a podium at Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis, Democratic Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman asked a crowd of gun-control supporters to hold up their phones and punch in a new contact, the switchboard for the U.S. Senate.

She told them to call every day, ask for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and demand that they vote in favor of universal background checks for gun sales.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: The results from the mayoral primary are in. Why did Reed lose? Did Slay win by as much as he had hoped? Then Jo shares some stories from Democrat Days and we close it out with Lt. Governor Peter Kinder's lawsuit.

Slay Poised To Make History

Mar 6, 2013
Mayor Slay.
Bill Greenblatt / UPI

Francis Slay is now poised to win a fourth term as mayor of St. Louis.

Slay walked away with the Democratic primary on Tuesday, beating Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.   Slay received 54 percent of the vote, Reed 44 percent and Matthews a little over one percent.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis voters go to the polls today to decide whether incumbent Mayor Francis Slay deserves a fourth term.

Today's municipal primary was expected to decide who will be mayor. No Republicans were running, and the Democratic nominee will be heavily favored over Green Party candidate James Eldon McNeely.

Candidate Profiles

Slay Seeking Unprecedented Fourth Four-Year Term

Mar 4, 2013
(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

If incumbent mayor Francis Slay wins the Democratic primary tomorrow and then goes on to win re-election in April, he will become the longest serving mayor in St. Louis history.

Serving over 12 years in the office, Slay believes there are many reasons he deserves an unprecedented fourth four-year term.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: photo-baum's on mayoral flyers, Shane Schoeller as the new executive director of the Missouri GOP, and the back and forth between Senator Claire McCaskill and newly-elected Congresswoman Ann Wagner on the Violence Against Women Act.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Mayor Francis Slay has unveiled the first-ever sustainability plan for the city of St. Louis.

Slay and his so-called "Vanguard Cabinet" of young city residents developed the plan with community input over the last two years.

It includes 29 immediate action items to be completed by or around 2018. Among them:

(via Flickr/pasa47)

St. Louis officials say a new federal grant could enable them to end long-term homelessness in the city in 18 months.

The city announced today that it had received $1.25 million to provide services like rental assistance, substance abuse and mental health treatment, and other support for those who have been living on the street long-term. 

Previous federal grants could only be used for specific populations, says human services director Bill Siedhoff. The new federal money will provide those critical support services to a broader population.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Chart updated at 2:24 to reflect most recent 24 and 48 hour campaign filings.

A week out from the Democratic mayoral primary, incumbent Mayor Francis Slay is maintaining his large financial advantage over challenger and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed.

According to campaign finance reports filed Monday evening, in a month long span from Jan. 20 to Feb. 21, Slay spent $479,291. During that same amount of time, Reed spent only a fraction of that at $88,470.

St. Louis City, County, Team Up On Economic Development

Feb 22, 2013
Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

After decades and decades of competing against each other for jobs, St. Louis City and County announced on Friday, a decision to partner up to attract new companies.

The proposal, called the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, would merge two agencies—The St. Louis Development Corporation in the city, and the St. Louis County Economic Development Council, under one roof.

Mayor Francis Slay says the move will create a sense of regionalism that has been lacking in economic development.

Flickr | alancleaver_2000

Quite a bit - city leaders say.

Crews from four St. Louis city departments are flooding a north city neighborhood this week in an ongoing effort to tackle its crime problem.

The influx of resources from the streets, building, forestry and health departments follows two weeks of stepped-up police presence known as “hot-spot policing."

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 10:03 with the Kwame Building Group's response.

In a late afternoon press conference Thursday, Board of Alderman President and mayoral candidate Lewis Reed accused incumbent Mayor Francis Slay of engaging in a "pay-to-play" system where businesses seeking construction contracts have to first make a donation to the mayor's campaign. The mayor's staff insisted that there are too many safeguards for this to even be possible.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

At Monday's forum, the three Democratic candidates made their case for why they should be St. Louis' next mayor. Incumbent mayor Francis Slay is seeking an unprecedented fourth four-year term, while the other two candidates argued it was time for someone else to take the reins.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 12:45 p.m. following forum - more to come.

Today, "St. Louis on the Air" hosted its St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum.

(For a full report of the event, see our Chris McDaniel's story here)

Today: St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum

Feb 11, 2013
(via Flickr/Richie Diesterheft)

The three candidates for the Democratic nomination for St. Louis mayor will take part in a one-hour town hall forum today. 

St. Louis Public Radio will air the forum, which is the second gathering of the candidates ahead of the March 5th primary election.

In liberal territory like St. Louis, the winner of the Democratic primary in March immediately becomes the presumptive favorite to win the general election on April 2nd.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Today on "St. Louis on the Air," we announced that we'll be hosting the St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum.  Here are some of the details:

Mayoral Debate Contentious In Downtown Forum

Jan 30, 2013
Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

At a mayoral debate showcasing the three Democrats vying for the position in the March 5 primary, challenger and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed wasted no time before going after his opponent.

Crime was by far the most contentious issue in the forum that filled two overflow rooms and was standing room only. Several times at the debate, Reed interrupted incumbent Mayor Francis Slay when he was talking about the city's lowering crime rate.

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