Frankie Muse Freeman | St. Louis Public Radio

Frankie Muse Freeman

(L-R) Adolphus Pruitt II, Percy Green and James Buford talk about the life and legacy of civil rights lawyer Frankie Muse Freeman.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Among the names of those who have been most involved in advancing civil rights in St. Louis, Frankie Muse Freeman’s  is one of the most prominent.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the life and legacy of the civil rights lawyer. Freeman died Jan. 12 at age 101. She worked to address and end cases of discrimination in St. Louis and nationally.

Frankie Muse Freeman at a gathering of local civil rights activists in 2014
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Jan. 17, 2018 with funeral information

Frankie Freeman’s career as a criminal defense lawyer didn’t last long.

Freeman, who died Friday at age 101, was best known for her work on civil rights, housing and education. But starting out, she took any kind of case she could get.

Civil Rights Attorney Frankie Muse Freeman will turn 100 years old in November.
Provided by the St. Louis American

This article first appeared in the St. Louis American, and is used with permission:

Frankie Muse Freeman’s mother once shared a poem with her.

“There’s a line, ‘It shows in your face,’” Freeman said during a Black History Month talk at Anheuser-Busch in 2010. “However you live, it shows on your face. That was the theme that I tried to show through the experiences of my life.”

Civil rights advocate Frankie Muse Freeman was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame in April 2015
Emanuele Berry / St. Louis Public Radio

More than 140 names grace a section of Delmar Boulevard known as the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

One of three inductees this year is longtime civil rights advocate and attorney Frankie Muse Freeman.

Frankie Freeman speaking at her induction into the St. Louis Walk of Fame 2015.
Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s a new name gracing the St. Louis Walk of Fame. Today a star was dedicated to civil rights advocate and attorney Frankie Muse Freeman.

The 98-year-old Freeman was surrounded by loved ones and admirers as she received her star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame on Delmar Boulevard.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: During an interview with the Beacon last summer, noted civil rights lawyer Frankie Freeman said she was ready to wind down, take life easy after more than a half century of civil rights work and public and private appointments. But duty has called once again, and she couldn't say no. She seldom can when the issue involves education and city schools.