Gateway Arch

Elementary students from KIPP Victory Academy in St. Louis and Rockwood Center for Creative Learning in Ellisville break ground on the Arch museum expansion Wednesday, April 29, 2015. CityArchRiver Executive Director Maggie Hales looks on from back.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Construction is underway on the Gateway Arch museum expansion.  The groundbreaking ceremony for the latest phase of the $380 million CityArchRiver project was held Wednesday at the site of the future entryway to the museum, sandwiched between the Arch and the soon-to-be-completed park over the highway.

Red and violet hues are seen in discoloration on the Gateway Arch, as an engineer and scientist from Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., studies its exterior.
Courtesy of Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.

The stains on the Gateway Arch's steel surface are not due to significant structural distress, deterioration or corrosion, according to the results of a comprehensive study on the monument's structural health released Thursday.

The bison will move to Fort Larned in Kansas
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

A bison migration is happening in St. Louis. The stuffed bison at the Museum of Westward Expansion is leaving for the Great Plains at Fort Larned in Kansas. According to Park Ranger Interpretative Specialist Richard Ziino, the bison is making way for contemporary learning styles.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Most of the renovations at the Gateway Arch are scheduled to be finished in October, in time for the monument’s 50th anniversary.

Work on the park over the highway, Luther Ely Smith Square and the riverfront will be done by October, said Ryan McClure, CityArchRiver’s communications director. CityArchRiver is a $380 million effort to connect the Gateway Arch and the city.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The group in charge of overhauling Kiener Plaza is giving the public a taste of what's to come.

CityArchRiver had an open house on Monday in downtown St. Louis to give the public a view of Kiener Plaza's redesign plans. It’s part of a broader project to revamp the Gateway Arch grounds over the next few years.

The group is planning to add an extensive playground and an interactive fountain. The project will also include a large event lawn for concerts and movies, as well as a place for people to park their bicycles.

Perry Bascom
Provided by the family

If you looked across a crowded room at a party and saw Perry Bascom, you might get the impression that he was just another unreconstructed preppy on his way to play tennis. Or should you glimpse him on his way to work, you might conclude he was one more soul heading downtown to commence another day of quiet desperation in business.

The trees that are slated for removal on the Arch grounds are marked with a pink ribbon.
Rebecca Smith/St. Louis Public Radio

The National Park Service will start removing 1,200 trees on the Gateway Arch grounds in earnest on Monday. 

The removal is part of a years-long project by CityArchRiver to renovate the popular tourist attraction, and it could start as early as Friday, according to the group's communications director Ryan McClure. He said the first few trees are coming down Friday to move in construction equipment.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Who ARE those daring engineers who have been rappelling down the north leg of the Gateway Arch to check the condition of the monument’s shiny stainless steel exterior?

Officially, they’re known as the “Difficult Access Team” of Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, a Chicago-based firm of engineers, architects and scientists who specialize in assessing and restoring historic buildings and monuments.

“We are building doctors,’’ says Stephen Kelley who is leading the project. “We are doing a diagnosis.”

File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

Engineers will be literally hanging around the Gateway Arch this week examining stains on the monument’s stainless steel exterior surface.

The engineers plan to descend from the hatch at the top of the 630-foot-tall Arch and use a rope system to descend down the north leg to an area about 425 feet above the ground where they will collect samples that could  help determine the best way to clean the monument.

Representatives of the National Park Service, Great Rivers Greenway, the City of St. Louis and the CityArchRiver 2015 Foundation break ground on the next phase of the CityArchRiver 2015 renovations.
Rebecca Smith/St. Louis Public Radio

The next round of renovations for the Gateway Arch grounds has begun.  On Thursday, representatives from the National Park Service, the City of St. Louis and other supporting organizations were on hand for the groundbreaking.

CityArchRiver 2015 renovations are geared toward making the grounds more accessible and enjoyable for all visitors.  

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