Gateway Arch

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

An effort to improve safety and access between the Gateway Arch and the riverfront has begun. City leaders and developers kicked off construction Thursday afternoon on the second phase of redeveloping the Arch grounds.

The $33-million project, centered along Leonor K. Sullivan Bvld., will elevate the corridor by nearly three feet to reduce flooding as well as add bike paths, walkways, better lighting and landscaping.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Construction of the Central River Project along the Gateway Arch begins November 14. It is a key component of the CityArchRiver 2015 redevelopment plans. Great Rivers Greenway is taking the lead on the project.

St. Louis Public Radio

National Parks and other federally-run recreation sites in Missouri are open again, now that the partial government shutdown is over.

Those sites include the Gateway Arch in downtown St. Louis.  Ann Honius with the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial says there are no lingering problems or issues stemming from the 16-day shutdown.

St. Louis Public Radio

A spokesman for Governor Jay Nixon (D) says his office is continuing to explore options on how to reopen the Gateway Arch and other National Park Service sites in Missouri.

St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri has joined a growing list of states looking to reopen national parks within their borders as the federal government shutdown continues.

In a statement released late Friday, Governor Jay Nixon (D) says he's directed members of his staff to put together a proposal for reopening National Park Service sites in Missouri, including the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Park.  He calls the two sites "national treasures" that draw millions of tourists every year and "generate significant economic activity."

(via Flickr/digitizedchaos)

St. Louis' identifying landmark, the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (aka The Gateway Arch), has been included on the World Monuments Fund's 2014 Watch List for at-risk monuments.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

National and state leaders broke ground Friday on the first phase of the CityArchRiver 2015 plan to revitalize the Gateway Arch grounds.

Two members of President Obama’s cabinet—Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx—were present at the ceremony. The first project is a park to be built over Interstate 70 to improve accessibility between downtown and the Arch grounds. Senator Claire McCaskill praised local officials for getting to this point.

Photo of the Week

Jul 29, 2013
Mike Matney / Via Flickr

Photo taken by Mike Matney on Flickr.com.

Join the St. Louis Public Radio Flickr group to see interesting photos taken in the St. Louis region and submit your own. Each week on our website and Facebook page we feature one outstanding photo from the group.

Used with permission from Yale University Press. From Eero Saarinen Papers Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, Photograph by Richard Knight

Author and historian Tracy Campbell views the Gateway Arch as an architectural wonder which draws millions of tourists to St. Louis, though he also argues the landmark is “an example of failed urban planning.”

To make way for the monument, nearly forty square blocks of riverfront property were demolished.  The demolition began during a public ceremony on October 9, 1939.

City leaders only gained traction for the project once it was framed as a monument to President Thomas Jefferson.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Although it wasn't the "environmentally preferred" alternative of the National Park Service, federal officials have given a thumbs-up to a plan to change the Arch grounds.

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