Gateway Arch | St. Louis Public Radio

Gateway Arch

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Construction of the Central River Project along the Gateway Arch begins November 14. It is a key component of the CityArchRiver 2015 redevelopment plans. Great Rivers Greenway is taking the lead on the project.

St. Louis Public Radio

National Parks and other federally-run recreation sites in Missouri are open again, now that the partial government shutdown is over.

Those sites include the Gateway Arch in downtown St. Louis.  Ann Honius with the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial says there are no lingering problems or issues stemming from the 16-day shutdown.

St. Louis Public Radio

A spokesman for Governor Jay Nixon (D) says his office is continuing to explore options on how to reopen the Gateway Arch and other National Park Service sites in Missouri.

St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri has joined a growing list of states looking to reopen national parks within their borders as the federal government shutdown continues.

In a statement released late Friday, Governor Jay Nixon (D) says he's directed members of his staff to put together a proposal for reopening National Park Service sites in Missouri, including the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Park.  He calls the two sites "national treasures" that draw millions of tourists every year and "generate significant economic activity."

(via Flickr/digitizedchaos)

St. Louis' identifying landmark, the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (aka The Gateway Arch), has been included on the World Monuments Fund's 2014 Watch List for at-risk monuments.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

National and state leaders broke ground Friday on the first phase of the CityArchRiver 2015 plan to revitalize the Gateway Arch grounds.

Two members of President Obama’s cabinet—Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx—were present at the ceremony. The first project is a park to be built over Interstate 70 to improve accessibility between downtown and the Arch grounds. Senator Claire McCaskill praised local officials for getting to this point.

300 pixels Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell took part in Friday's ceremony.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

With two Cabinet secretaries in tow, regional leaders took their ceremonial shovels and broke ground to celebrate the beginning of roadwork construction, the first step in redoing the Gateway Arch's grounds.

Federal, state and local officials – including Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Transpiration Secretary Anthony Foxx – were on hand Friday downtown to kick off road construction for the $380 million CityArchRiver project. The initiative is aimed at sprucing up the Arch grounds in time for the monument's 50th anniversary on Oct. 28, 2015.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With two Cabinet secretaries in tow, regional leaders took their ceremonial shovels and broke ground to celebrate the beginning of roadwork construction, the first step in redoing the Gateway Arch's grounds.

Photo of the Week

Jul 29, 2013
Mike Matney / Via Flickr

Photo taken by Mike Matney on Flickr.com.

Join the St. Louis Public Radio Flickr group to see interesting photos taken in the St. Louis region and submit your own. Each week on our website and Facebook page we feature one outstanding photo from the group.

Sam Washburn | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In Snapshots, illustrator Sam Washburn looks at a regional place or thing that has caught his attention. Because of all the discussion about the renovation of the Arch grounds, he decided to check out the Museum of Westward Expansion.

We found a wealth of objects in an area that few people talk about.

The Beacon hopes these will make the reader smile in recognition, as often happened with his earlier series: Intersections.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Although it wasn't the "environmentally preferred" alternative of the National Park Service, federal officials have given a thumbs-up to a plan to change the Arch grounds.

This rendering of the "Riverfront Era" story zone in the new Arch museum shows how the Old Rock House facade (left center) will be incorporated.
Courtesy CityArchRiver Foundation

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - The leaders of an effort to refurbish the grounds around the Gateway Arch say that the project is on track to be finished in time for the monument’s 50th birthday.

At CityArchRiver 2015’s report to the community, representatives from the public-private partnership joined representatives from the National Parks Services, the Missouri Department of Transportation, Great Rivers Greenway and Haley Sharpe Design to update the $380 million project. Several hundred people watched the presentation at the Ferrara theater in downtown St. Louis.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

During its annual update to the public, the CityArchRiver foundation and its partners said they’re on track to complete improvements to the Gateway Arch grounds by 2015.

Ed Hassinger, district engineer for The Missouri Department of Transportation, confirmed that work toward a pedestrian bridge connecting downtown to the Arch is starting this summer.

CityArchRiver Chairman Walter Metcalfe said the bridge, along with a slew of other upgrades, could result in keeping visitors an extra half day.  

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The leaders of an effort to refurbish the grounds around the Gateway Arch say that the project is on track to be finished in time for the monument’s 50th birthday.

At CityArchRiver 2015’s report to the community, representatives from the public-private partnership joined representatives from the National Parks Services, the Missouri Department of Transportation, Great Rivers Greenway and Haley Sharpe Design to update the $380 million project. Several hundred people watched the presentation at the Ferrara theatre in downtown St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Much like a river itself, Proposition P has taken a meandering path. The sales tax increase had to weave its way through the General Assembly, be placed on the ballot by local legislatures and receive affirmative votes in St. Louis and St. Louis County

When all the votes were tallied, proponents of the proposition got what they wanted: voter approval in St. Louis and, by a narrower margin, St. Louis County. The 3/16ths of one-cent sales tax increase is set to provide tens of millions of dollars annually for local parks, regional trails and – perhaps most notably – improvements around the Gateway Arch grounds.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Voters in St. Louis and St. Louis County approved Proposition P, a 3/16ths of one-cent sales tax increase to fund improvement around the Gateway Arch, local parks and regional trails.

In the city of St. Louis, Prop P passed with 67.2 percent in favor and 32.78 percent of voters disapproving.

In St. Louis County, after an early lead, Prop P found its support slipping dramatically. But with almost all the county vote in, the ballot measure squeaked through with 52.75 percent of the vote.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Proposition P is perhaps getting the most attention for providing local funding for improvements on the Gateway Arch grounds, an unprecedented move aimed at sprucing up the St. Louis landmark.

But money for the Arch is a relatively small part of the sales tax increase, slated for an April 2 vote in St. Louis and St. Louis County.

A new rendering of exhibits at the museum under the Arch.
CityArchRiver 2015

Renderings courtesy CityArchRiver 2015 A new rendering of exhibits at the museum under the Arch.

The exhibits in the museum beneath the Gateway Arch haven’t changed much since the museum first opened in 1976. Ditto for the ones at the Old Courthouse, which have also grown old.

Old Courthouse rendering from 2013
CityArchRiver 2015

While much of the CityArchRiver plan for reviving the Gateway Arch and what’s around it involves new attractions and activities, Trivers Associates is focusing on a piece of the area’s history: the Old Courthouse.

As prime architect, Trivers is overseeing renovations and updates for the domed building. Because it dates back to the early 1800s and is one of the most iconic structures in that area, renovating and updating present special challenges.

The Gateway Arch, a biography by Tracy Campbell
Book cover

At first glance, a new history of the Gateway Arch that promises to “dispel long-held myths” and cast a “provocative new light” might appear an epic attempt to throw a wet blanket over our town’s shiny national monument on the riverfront.

But even as historian Tracy Campbell weaves his thorough and often unflattering story of the city politics and private-interest ambitions that played heavily in the Arch’s formative years, he can’t help but admire the 630-foot architectural marvel that is recognized by people all over the world.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Supporters of a sales tax increase to fund an upgrade of the Arch grounds, along with local parks and trails, are gearing up for a two-and-a-half month campaign.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen voted today 20-3-1 today put the measure on the April 6 ballot, when it will also be considered in St. Louis County. Aldermen Sam Moore, Antonio French and Scott Ogilvie voted no, and Ald. Terry Kennedy voted present. Two aldermen were absent.

'Arch Tax' Approved By St. Louis Board Of Aldermen

Jan 11, 2013
AP

A tax to generate funds to improve the Gateway Arch, as well regional parks and trails took a step forward in the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Friday.

The so-called “Arch Tax” creates a 3/16th cent sales tax.  If approved by voters in St. Louis City and County the tax would raise $120 million for the Arch grounds.

It would also raise about $600 million for city and county parks as well as the Great Rivers Greenway park and trail district.

The bill passed overwhelmingly with 24 in favor, 3 against and 1 “present” vote.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Pinnacle Entertainment, the company that operates the Lumiere casino on Laclede's Landing, has announced plans to invest more than $11 million in several non-profit projects in downtown St. Louis.

The donations help the company fulfill part of its redevelopment agreement with the city, which was first drafted in 2004 and called for $50 million in investments by this December. They include:

Flickr/jdnx

St. Louis aldermen on Friday took the first step in the long process of securing money for an upgrade of the Arch grounds.

(via City Arch River video)

A new look at the Arch grounds, as they're planned to be post-redevelopment in 2015, has been released.

CityArchRiver, the group behind the redevelopment of the Gateway Arch and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, put the video together.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis is one the country’s most recognizable landmarks.  Its construction was completed this month, 47 years ago, in 1965.

Flickr/jdnx

Will be updated.

The quintessential symbol of the St. Louis region, the Gateway Arch, has been under special scrutiny lately as rusty stains on its structure caused concerns.

The National Park Service has released a report from a Chicago engineering firm today saying that the stains are merely cosmetic and that the Arch is "as sound today as the day it was built." (It was completed in 1965 - and for the history lovers out there, here's a gallery of that process).

This poll from 60 minutes/Vanity Fair was published Aug. 31 but is making the St. Louis social media rounds today. It ranks St. Louis' ubiquitous Gateway Arch as the least impressive among the poll's choices. What do you think? Check out the other choices via the link. UPDATE: Shortly after this posting, the numbers switched, as it was an open poll, after all. Perhaps a legion of people who are impressed with the Arch took to the poll?

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Updated with more detailed figures on funding

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) gave the public a look tonight at its plan to build what it calls a “lid” to connect downtown St. Louis with the Gateway Arch.

But before it breaks ground, MoDOT Engineer Deanna Venker said the agency has to take into account a whole range of potential impacts.

A family photo made by Charles Guggenheim: P. [Philip] Davis Guggenheim, Marion Streett Guggenheim, Grace Guggenheim, Jonathan Guggenheim
Provided by Grace Guggenheim

“Monument to the Dream” -- documentarian Charles Guggenheim’s masterful 1960s tribute to the builders of the Gateway Arch -- is undergoing a “facelift” to bring it into the digital age.

His daughter Grace Guggenheim, who is overseeing the digitization, acknowledges that it is a heavy responsibility.

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