Gateway Arch

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Pinnacle Entertainment, the company that operates the Lumiere casino on Laclede's Landing, has announced plans to invest more than $11 million in several non-profit projects in downtown St. Louis.

The donations help the company fulfill part of its redevelopment agreement with the city, which was first drafted in 2004 and called for $50 million in investments by this December. They include:


St. Louis aldermen on Friday took the first step in the long process of securing money for an upgrade of the Arch grounds.

(via City Arch River video)

A new look at the Arch grounds, as they're planned to be post-redevelopment in 2015, has been released.

CityArchRiver, the group behind the redevelopment of the Gateway Arch and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, put the video together.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis is one the country’s most recognizable landmarks.  Its construction was completed this month, 47 years ago, in 1965.


Will be updated.

The quintessential symbol of the St. Louis region, the Gateway Arch, has been under special scrutiny lately as rusty stains on its structure caused concerns.

The National Park Service has released a report from a Chicago engineering firm today saying that the stains are merely cosmetic and that the Arch is "as sound today as the day it was built." (It was completed in 1965 - and for the history lovers out there, here's a gallery of that process).

This poll from 60 minutes/Vanity Fair was published Aug. 31 but is making the St. Louis social media rounds today. It ranks St. Louis' ubiquitous Gateway Arch as the least impressive among the poll's choices. What do you think? Check out the other choices via the link. UPDATE: Shortly after this posting, the numbers switched, as it was an open poll, after all. Perhaps a legion of people who are impressed with the Arch took to the poll?

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Updated with more detailed figures on funding

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) gave the public a look tonight at its plan to build what it calls a “lid” to connect downtown St. Louis with the Gateway Arch.

But before it breaks ground, MoDOT Engineer Deanna Venker said the agency has to take into account a whole range of potential impacts.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri lawmakers have approved legislation that would allow residents in the St. Louis area to vote on whether to raise a local sales tax to help fund improvements at the Gateway Arch.

The measure would allow a local election on a 3/16 percent sales tax. Part of the money would go to the Gateway Arch, and a portion would go to local parks. It also would allow voters in the Kansas City area to decide on a 1/10th percent sales tax for parks, trails and greenways in Jackson County.

(David Cappaert, Michigan State University)

Nearly half of the trees on the grounds of the Gateway Arch will be removed and replaced with a different species.

The National Park Service said Thursday that more than 900 Rosehill ash trees will be taken out over concerns about the threat posed by the Emerald Ash Borer, a beetle that has killed millions of ash trees in 15 states. Officials at the Arch say the ash trees on the grounds are also showing signs of decline from urban factors like air pollution and less than ideal soil.

(Bill Raack/St. Louis Public Radio)

The renovation of the Gateway Arch grounds is being called a “magnificent project” by two presidential cabinet members. 

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood were in St. Louis Wednesday to celebrate a new $20 million federal grant for the project. The grant will help pay for a new “pedestrian lid” over Interstate 70 so people can move more easily between the Arch and downtown St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The effort to upgrade the grounds of the Gateway Arch is getting a boost from the federal government - a $20 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The agency planning the project, CityArchRiver 2015 Foundation, announced Monday that the grant will pay for roadway improvements along Interstate 70 near the site of the Arch, including a pedestrian land bridge over I-70 connecting the Old Courthouse, Luther Ely Smith Square and the Arch grounds.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Members of many faiths gathered at the grounds of the Gateway Arch on Sunday to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the September 11th attacks.

The St. Louis office of the Council of American-Islamic Relations organized the event, which included a recitation of the Muslim afternoon prayer.

After 9/11, members of the Muslim community were blamed for the attacks simply because of their religion, said Faizan Syed, CAIR's executive director here in St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Late Friday afternoon, William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, announced that the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, also known as the Gateway Arch and its grounds, has received a federal transportation grant. The grant will help fund engineering and planning for a pedestrian connector linking the Arch and downtown St. Louis.

(David Cappaert, Michigan State University)

The National Park Service is bracing for the possible loss of more than 900 trees near the Gateway Arch. That’s what could happen if the emerald ash borer makes it to the St. Louis area.

The emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced to the U.S. in the early 1990s.

(Martin Pion, Conservion)

A ceremony will be held on the Gateway Arch grounds tomorrow to honor a woman who was struck and killed by a charter bus while walking in downtown St. Louis nine years ago.

Susie Stephens was a strong advocate for bicycle and pedestrian safety, and was attending a conference on the issue in 2002 when she lost her life near the Adam's Mark Hotel. Her mother, Nancy MacKerrow, has been planting trees around the country in Susie's honor for years, but this is the first in St. Louis.

St. Louis Public Radio

With the possibility of a federal government shutdown looming comes a less-obvious consequence.

The St. Louis Business Journal reports that if the shutdown occurs, a signature landmark of St. Louis, the Gateway Arch, would also close.

Updated 4:48 p.m. Feb. 9, 2011:

KSDK-TV reports that the injuries sustained were broken ribs and that Arch officials say the man was pinned between the tram and the structure of the Arch.

The Arch was closed for about an hour before it reopened.

Earlier Story:

(CityArchRiver 2015)

The $578 million plan to overhaul the grounds of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (better known as the Arch) now has oversight in place.

The updated plans for the Gateway Arch were revealed at a public meeting last night as well as the possible cost of the project.

The preliminary figure is $578.5 million.

Walter Metcalfe, Jr., who has headed up the CityArchRiver foundation that sponsored the design competition, says completing a vision is worth the price:

Bill Greenblatt / UPI

The U.S. Secretary of the Interior and the Transportation Secretary were in East St. Louis today to talk about improvements to the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, a.k.a. the grounds of the Gateway Arch.