Gateway Arch

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Although it wasn't the "environmentally preferred" alternative of the National Park Service, federal officials have given a thumbs-up to a plan to change the Arch grounds.

This rendering of the "Riverfront Era" story zone in the new Arch museum shows how the Old Rock House facade (left center) will be incorporated.
Courtesy CityArchRiver Foundation

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - The leaders of an effort to refurbish the grounds around the Gateway Arch say that the project is on track to be finished in time for the monument’s 50th birthday.

At CityArchRiver 2015’s report to the community, representatives from the public-private partnership joined representatives from the National Parks Services, the Missouri Department of Transportation, Great Rivers Greenway and Haley Sharpe Design to update the $380 million project. Several hundred people watched the presentation at the Ferrara theater in downtown St. Louis.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

During its annual update to the public, the CityArchRiver foundation and its partners said they’re on track to complete improvements to the Gateway Arch grounds by 2015.

Ed Hassinger, district engineer for The Missouri Department of Transportation, confirmed that work toward a pedestrian bridge connecting downtown to the Arch is starting this summer.

CityArchRiver Chairman Walter Metcalfe said the bridge, along with a slew of other upgrades, could result in keeping visitors an extra half day.  

A new rendering of exhibits at the museum under the Arch.
CityArchRiver 2015

Renderings courtesy CityArchRiver 2015 A new rendering of exhibits at the museum under the Arch.

The exhibits in the museum beneath the Gateway Arch haven’t changed much since the museum first opened in 1976. Ditto for the ones at the Old Courthouse, which have also grown old.

Old Courthouse rendering from 2013
CityArchRiver 2015

While much of the CityArchRiver plan for reviving the Gateway Arch and what’s around it involves new attractions and activities, Trivers Associates is focusing on a piece of the area’s history: the Old Courthouse.

As prime architect, Trivers is overseeing renovations and updates for the domed building. Because it dates back to the early 1800s and is one of the most iconic structures in that area, renovating and updating present special challenges.

The Gateway Arch, a biography by Tracy Campbell
Book cover

At first glance, a new history of the Gateway Arch that promises to “dispel long-held myths” and cast a “provocative new light” might appear an epic attempt to throw a wet blanket over our town’s shiny national monument on the riverfront.

But even as historian Tracy Campbell weaves his thorough and often unflattering story of the city politics and private-interest ambitions that played heavily in the Arch’s formative years, he can’t help but admire the 630-foot architectural marvel that is recognized by people all over the world.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Supporters of a sales tax increase to fund an upgrade of the Arch grounds, along with local parks and trails, are gearing up for a two-and-a-half month campaign.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen voted today 20-3-1 today put the measure on the April 6 ballot, when it will also be considered in St. Louis County. Aldermen Sam Moore, Antonio French and Scott Ogilvie voted no, and Ald. Terry Kennedy voted present. Two aldermen were absent.

'Arch Tax' Approved By St. Louis Board Of Aldermen

Jan 11, 2013
AP

A tax to generate funds to improve the Gateway Arch, as well regional parks and trails took a step forward in the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Friday.

The so-called “Arch Tax” creates a 3/16th cent sales tax.  If approved by voters in St. Louis City and County the tax would raise $120 million for the Arch grounds.

It would also raise about $600 million for city and county parks as well as the Great Rivers Greenway park and trail district.

The bill passed overwhelmingly with 24 in favor, 3 against and 1 “present” vote.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Pinnacle Entertainment, the company that operates the Lumiere casino on Laclede's Landing, has announced plans to invest more than $11 million in several non-profit projects in downtown St. Louis.

The donations help the company fulfill part of its redevelopment agreement with the city, which was first drafted in 2004 and called for $50 million in investments by this December. They include:

Flickr/jdnx

St. Louis aldermen on Friday took the first step in the long process of securing money for an upgrade of the Arch grounds.

(via City Arch River video)

A new look at the Arch grounds, as they're planned to be post-redevelopment in 2015, has been released.

CityArchRiver, the group behind the redevelopment of the Gateway Arch and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, put the video together.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis is one the country’s most recognizable landmarks.  Its construction was completed this month, 47 years ago, in 1965.

Flickr/jdnx

Will be updated.

The quintessential symbol of the St. Louis region, the Gateway Arch, has been under special scrutiny lately as rusty stains on its structure caused concerns.

The National Park Service has released a report from a Chicago engineering firm today saying that the stains are merely cosmetic and that the Arch is "as sound today as the day it was built." (It was completed in 1965 - and for the history lovers out there, here's a gallery of that process).

This poll from 60 minutes/Vanity Fair was published Aug. 31 but is making the St. Louis social media rounds today. It ranks St. Louis' ubiquitous Gateway Arch as the least impressive among the poll's choices. What do you think? Check out the other choices via the link. UPDATE: Shortly after this posting, the numbers switched, as it was an open poll, after all. Perhaps a legion of people who are impressed with the Arch took to the poll?

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Updated with more detailed figures on funding

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) gave the public a look tonight at its plan to build what it calls a “lid” to connect downtown St. Louis with the Gateway Arch.

But before it breaks ground, MoDOT Engineer Deanna Venker said the agency has to take into account a whole range of potential impacts.

A family photo made by Charles Guggenheim: P. [Philip] Davis Guggenheim, Marion Streett Guggenheim, Grace Guggenheim, Jonathan Guggenheim
Provided by Grace Guggenheim

“Monument to the Dream” -- documentarian Charles Guggenheim’s masterful 1960s tribute to the builders of the Gateway Arch -- is undergoing a “facelift” to bring it into the digital age.

His daughter Grace Guggenheim, who is overseeing the digitization, acknowledges that it is a heavy responsibility.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri lawmakers have approved legislation that would allow residents in the St. Louis area to vote on whether to raise a local sales tax to help fund improvements at the Gateway Arch.

The measure would allow a local election on a 3/16 percent sales tax. Part of the money would go to the Gateway Arch, and a portion would go to local parks. It also would allow voters in the Kansas City area to decide on a 1/10th percent sales tax for parks, trails and greenways in Jackson County.

(David Cappaert, Michigan State University)

Nearly half of the trees on the grounds of the Gateway Arch will be removed and replaced with a different species.

The National Park Service said Thursday that more than 900 Rosehill ash trees will be taken out over concerns about the threat posed by the Emerald Ash Borer, a beetle that has killed millions of ash trees in 15 states. Officials at the Arch say the ash trees on the grounds are also showing signs of decline from urban factors like air pollution and less than ideal soil.

(Bill Raack/St. Louis Public Radio)

The renovation of the Gateway Arch grounds is being called a “magnificent project” by two presidential cabinet members. 

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood were in St. Louis Wednesday to celebrate a new $20 million federal grant for the project. The grant will help pay for a new “pedestrian lid” over Interstate 70 so people can move more easily between the Arch and downtown St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The effort to upgrade the grounds of the Gateway Arch is getting a boost from the federal government - a $20 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The agency planning the project, CityArchRiver 2015 Foundation, announced Monday that the grant will pay for roadway improvements along Interstate 70 near the site of the Arch, including a pedestrian land bridge over I-70 connecting the Old Courthouse, Luther Ely Smith Square and the Arch grounds.

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