Gateway Media Literacy Partners

Larry Morris, left, and Art Silverblatt talk to ‘St. Louis on the Air’ host Don Marsh about media literacy and critical thinking on Feb. 26, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

You’ve likely seen Facebook or Twitter posts from friends or family members that link to information that seems almost but not quite plausible. Those stories often are about politicians; recently several surfaced that purported to be about Michael Brown. How can you figure out if the video or story is real or not? It comes down to critical thinking and media literacy.

Gateway Media Literacy Partners

New types of media, including social media, are changing the media landscape, but aren’t changing the need for media literacy.

“We define media literacy at Project Look Sharp as the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and create media,” Sox Sperry told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. Sperry is director of curriculum and staff development at Project Look Sharp, a media literacy initiative at Ithaca College in New York.

(via Flickr/Jason Howie)

With the advent of smart phones and tablets, media messages are now ever-present. And with social media, Internet television, satellite radio, blogs and self-publishing in addition to traditional print and broadcasting, the number of media messages out there is also ever-increasing.

That makes it all the more important that people have the ability to critically deconstruct the messages the media convey.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

Ongoing media coverage of Hurricane Sandy has highlighted the importance of media literacy.

Some news outlets incorrectly reported the New York Stock Exchange floor was flooded and numerous images have been doctored or a misrepresentation of current events.