Gender-Based Wage Gap | St. Louis Public Radio

Gender-Based Wage Gap

Statewide population data shows that females in Missouri ages 16 and older who work full-time jobs all year won’t earn as much as men until 2066.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

While pay for most Missouri women lags behind that of men, leaders at the Women’s Foundation of Greater St. Louis say some local businesses are leading the way in compensation as well as hiring and promoting women.

The organization released results from a 2017 Employment Scorecard survey ahead of Equal Pay Day, April 10, a symbolic date that draws awareness to pay inequality between men and women, and some cases among women themselves. 

Nicole Roach and Lorie Jackson discussed the barriers women of color face in the workplace - and how to overcome them - on Monday's St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Women of color will make up the majority of the female population in the United States by 2050 and yet they often face disproportionate barriers in the workplace, healthcare, educational attainment and other areas of life.

New numbers show Missouri's women who worked full-time earned about 78 percent of men's earnings in 2013.
(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

New numbers show women working full-time in Missouri made 78.1 percent of what men did in 2013.

According to data released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Show-Me State's women earned a median wage of $665 per week, compared to men's $852 in 2013. The state's women's-to-men's earnings ratio dropped slightly from 2012.

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois is joining President Barack Obama and fellow Democrats in an election-year push to bridge the pay gap between men and women.

Speaking on the Senate Floor Tuesday, Durbin called on his Republican colleagues to help pass the Paycheck Fairness Act.

“It says that women cannot be discriminated in the workplace simply because they are women,” he said.

New numbers show Missouri's women who worked full-time earned about 78 percent of men's earnings in 2013.
(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

Only four other metropolitan areas in the United States have bigger gender-based wage gaps than St. Louis. 

That's according to rankings out from the National Partnership for Women & Families.

Here's how wages between men and women in the "top 5" metropolitan areas in the rankings shake out:

1. Seattle: $0.27 wage gap

2. Pittsburgh: $0.27 wage gap