graduation rates

Field of students at a graduation
(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

An NPR report shows Missouri's high school graduation rate increased five percentage points  between 2011 and 2013, good enough to rank 10th in the country. But that number may not tell the whole story.

The Truth About America's Graduation Rate looks at factors affecting the graduation rate around the country, and why the national rate of 81 percent — an all time high — may not be as good as it seems.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

A program designed to push poor and minority students toward high school graduation and college and career readiness will expand in the St. Louis Public Schools.

Fueled by a $300,000 grant from AT&T, the Advancement Via Individual Determination  (AVID) program will go from serving around 300 students to 3,400 students at Cleveland Jr. Naval Academy, Gateway STEM High School, Roosevelt High School, Soldan International Studies High School, Sumner High School and Vashon High School. 

University of Missouri System

The University of Missouri is expanding an early alert system that tracks academic performance to all four of its campuses this fall.

The system, developed by the company Starfish Retention Solutions, is designed to improve retention and graduation rates by better connecting students, faculty and staff.  

The expansion follows the success of a pilot program at the university's Columbia campus that gives advisors real-time grading information on students and tracks performance trends among classes and subjects. 

Remko van Dokkum | Flickr

The path to a high school equivalency certificate in Missouri is about to be rewired.

Starting in January the GED exam, which has been used in the state since the 1940s, will be replaced.  It’s a move driven by digital change and an age old consideration -- cost.

Keyboards replace pencils

(via Flickr/Adam Procter)

A task force is recommending that funding for universities and community colleges in Missouri be based in part on graduation rates and other performance-based criteria.

The recommendation was presented today in Jefferson City to the state’s Coordinating Board for Higher Education.  State Senator David Pearce (R, Warrensburg) chairs the Senate Education Committee.

(via Flickr/Lauren Manning)

Preliminary figures on how many Missouri high school students earn their diplomas have been released, and a new procedure for calculating graduation rates is being used.

The new procedure is mandated by the federal government,  and it only takes into account students who complete high school in four years time.  Michele Clark is with the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE).