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Grandel Theatre

Brandon Bieber played a number of different roles in the recent touring production of "Something Rotten."
Brandon Bieber

When Brandon Bieber was a toddler, his parents took him to his older sisters’ dance recitals.

Soon, he was riveted to the sight of their sequins and sashays. When a call went out for children to be part of a Westport Playhouse production of “The Phantom of the Opera,” his sister tried out.

“They said, ‘We like her — and we’ll take the boy, too,’” Bieber said.

For more than a decade, Bieber has worked as a Broadway and touring dancer and actor. He’s back in St. Louis to direct a St. Lou Fringe Festival play about a stock-car racer challenging traditional female stereotypes, called “Race Cars and Romance.”

Producers of "Forget Me Not" are hoping to inspire audience members to  connect with local health professionals and learn more about Alzheimer's. 8/1/18
African-Americans Against Alzheimer's

When actors in the play "Forget Me Not" take the stage tonight at the Grandel Theatre in St. Louis, they’ll have an important mission. They aim to raise awareness that African-Americans have a higher incidence of Alzheimer’s disease than whites, and to provide tips about how to recognize the symptoms of the brain disease.

Playwright Garrett Davis, who heads the North Carolina-based theater troupe Gdavis Productions, wrote the play — produced by African-Americans Against Alzheimer’s — as an educational aid. The group is part of the national advocacy organization Us Against Alzheimer’s.

Tom Murray and Ed Reggi joined host Don Marsh to discuss the opening of “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Opening the curtain on themes such as forbidden love and secret identities, Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” opens Thursday in Grand Center.

This classic farcical comedy set in 1890s London follows the lives of two friends using the same alias, “Ernest,” for their clandestine activities. “At the core of this play, it’s really about who are we in public versus who are we in private,” Ed Reggi said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

MADCO, Saint Louis Ballet and The Big Muddy Dance Company all come together this weekend for “New Dance Horizons VI: Live at the Grandel” presented by Dance St. Louis.
Gerry Love

Several weeks’ worth of intensive collaboration will culminate this Saturday as three local dance companies present brand-new works during a performance that is really three shows in one.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what makes the “New Dance Horizons VI: Live at the Grandel” event particularly unique. Joining the conversation were Brian Enos, artistic director of The Big Muddy Dance Company, and Terence Marling, artistic consultant for Dance St. Louis.

Henry Adebonojo

Metro Theater Company’s next production, in partnership with Jazz St. Louis, is called “Bud, Not Buddy.” The play is based on a children’s novel that won a Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature.

It’s about a 10-year-old boy in Flint, Michigan, named Bud who, during the Great Depression, goes on an adventure to find his father.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer talked with Grammy award-winning jazz trumpeter and composer Terence Blanchard. Blanchard composed the score for the play and will appear at a concert to benefit Metro Theater Company.

Metro Theater Company

This month, Metro Theater Company will turn the Grandel Theatre into an ice rink set in Amsterdam. Their production will bring to life the classic tale of “Hans Brinker and the Silver Skates” starting Dec. 6.

On Tuesday‘s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to the production’s playwright Laura Eason and Metro Theater Company’s artistic director Julia Flood. St. Louis will be the second city to see this play.

Courtesy of Stewart Goldstein

After being ousted from their home at The Grandel Theatre in Grand Center, The Black Rep theater company has found a new place for its productions at Harris-Stowe State University.

The company will now hold its performances at the Emerson Performance Center on the school’s campus, which seats over 200. The Grandel Theatre was owned by Grand Center Incorporated, which sold it earlier this summer.