Grannie Annie

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

We’ve talked with the local storytelling project, Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration, extensively for a number of years, but 2015 marks something special: the tenth anniversary of the organization. For that birthday, the project partnered with students all over the world to anthologize stories of an important era in international history—World War II—from previous editions of Grannie Annie books.

An illustration by Rachel Liang, who was a fifth-grade student at Twin Oaks Christian School in Ballwin at the time, accompanies "The Disk in the Sky," a story written last year by Sydney Kinzy, who was an eighth-grader at Parkway West Middle School.
The Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration

Holiday family time often turns into story time. The Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration wants students to help capture those family stories.

Grannie Annie encourages fourth- through eighth-grade students to write and share family stories.

(Courtesy The Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration)

When families gather for the holidays, it can be an opportunity to tell stories and pass on memories. For the St. Louis-based Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration, that provides a possible treasure trove for young people to build writing skills and forge strong family bonds.

Every year, The Grannie Annie publishes a volume of family stories written by students in the fourth to the eighth grade.

(Courtesy: The Grannie Annie)

Public radio listeners are familiar with weekly Friday segments from StoryCorps in which family members and close friends talk with one another, sharing memorable stories.

And as we head into the holiday season and families begin to gather, we’re reminded of opportunities to take full advantage of documenting and preserving family histories and stories.