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Great Rivers Greenway

Fur traders Pierre Laclede and Auguste Chouteau are credited with settling The Landing's original nine-block area in 1764.
LacledesLanding.com

An effort to revitalize a once-bustling section of downtown St. Louis is underway. Developers are pumping roughly $20 million into Laclede's Landing for retail, office, restaurant and residential space.

The investments follow some tough years for the area with Gateway Arch grounds construction and a down economy.

"We're done licking our wounds," said Laclede's Landing Community Improvement District President John Clark. "It was a dusty mess and there was some tragedy along the way. We lost a few businesses."

Great Rivers Greenway

Boston-based design firm Stoss Landscape Urbanism will lead the design of the proposed Chouteau Greenway, a network of trails and green spaces that would connect Forest Park to the Gateway Arch. The firm beat three other finalists in an eight-month-long competition.

Artist rendering of a new MetroLink station being constructed between Boyle Avene and Sarah Street, the first segment of the proposed Chouteau Greenway.
Great Rivers Greenway

Great Rivers Greenway will introduce four teams vying to design the proposed Chouteau Greenway at two public events the first week of January.

A jury of nine local and international experts chose the four teams to advance in a design competition that was announced last fall, said Susan Trautman, chief executive officer of the agency.

Trailnet claims a 12-mile walking and biking trail network could boost property values and business districts, while making the city more attractive to younger generations.
Trailnet

Trailnet wants to build a network of bicycle and walking trails that would connect St. Louis' north side and south side neighborhoods to an east-west trail that stretches from downtown to Washington University.

The nonprofit, which has been working for several years to develop a network of protected trails on existing city streets, has released a map that shows the general location of the proposed paths. They reach north to Fairground Park and Old North and south to Lafayette Square, Tower Grove and Cherokee Street.

Pedestrian, biking bridges to be built in St. Charles

Feb 13, 2017
Future plans for highway crossing over 364 and 94 in St. Charles. Plans to be finished in spring 2018.
provided / Great Rivers Greenway

Pedestrians and bikers will eventually be able to cross over two busy highways in St. Charles. A project is planned to construct two new pedestrian bridges over highways 364 and 94. 

A view of the Trestle above I-70, just north of downtown St. Louis.
Paul Sableman | Flickr

Josie McDonald is “always looking for new walkable and bikeable destinations in the city.” She says she fell in love with St. Louis because of its road and bike path bike-ability.

But something’s been weighing on her mind for a while: a seeming bike path she just can’t bike. It goes by the name of “The Trestle” and you may have seen it as you drive on Interstate 70 north out of downtown St. Louis.

So, she asked Curious Louis to solve the mystery for her — so we have.

Bike path opens over Missouri River at I-64

Jun 9, 2016
Missouri Department of Transportation

A bicycle and pedestrian trail crossing the Missouri River on the I-64 Daniel Boone Bridge opened Thursday. The path connects the Monarch Levee Trail in St. Louis County to the Katy Trail in St. Charles County.

Executive Director of the Missouri Bicycle and Pedestrian Federation Brent Hugh says the path will bring more trail users into riverside communities.

A worker uses a leaf blower to clear an updated section of the riverfront along Leonor K. Sullivan Boulevard.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Efforts to transform the Gateway Arch grounds and surrounding areas downtown have reached a major milestone along the Mississippi River. The public is invited to attend a ribbon cutting ceremony Thursday afternoon to mark the completion of a $33 million central riverfront redevelopment project. The work finished along a 1.5 mile stretch of Leonor K.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” representatives from Great Rivers Greenway joined host Don Marsh to discuss their strategic plan on building, promoting and sustaining greenways, or trails, for the next five years in the St. Louis region.

The group is holding several open houses in the coming weeks to gather more feedback from the community, including an event Wednesday afternoon at the Bridgeton Trails Branch Library at 4 p.m. You can also take a 10-minute survey online at the same link.

The guests:

Bike riders on the bike lane on Union Blvd in St. louis.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio file photo

The sales tax district charged with building and maintaining trails in St. Louis, St. Louis County and St. Charles County is seeking public input on a new regional plan.

Great Rivers Greenway is collecting survey responses online and at two open houses to find out how people are using the trails now and how they’d like to use them in the future.

Jessica Witte will launch a seed-art project, similar to this August 2015 one in Belleville, along the St. Louis riverfront June 3-5.
Jessica Witte

St. Louisans will get to participate in a massive art project on the riverfront this summer, thanks to a new public art grant.

The local Critical Mass for the Arts announced the winner of its first-ever public works endeavor today. The group awarded multimedia artist Jessica Witte $10,000 for her “Seed the Change” idea.

The Jefferson National Expansion Memorial could change to the Gateway Arch National Park by July 2018.
(photo by Tim Tolle via Flickr Creative Commons)

Two days of celebrations are planned for the Gateway Arch’s 50th anniversary this October.

According to organizers with the CityArchRiver Foundation and Great Rivers Greenway, citizens and dignitaries will gather on Wednesday, Oct. 28, near the Old Courthouse to commemorate the moment when builders set in place the landmark’s crucial keystone. The Missouri History Museum is also hosting an exhibit and panel discussion that day.

A rendering of Leonore K. Sullivan along the proposed north riverfront water park.
courtesy Great Rivers Greenway

With the Gateway Arch grounds renovations nearing completion, the Great Rivers Greenway District is gearing up for another big project. The district and the city of St. Louis presented initial plans to revitalize the north riverfront Wednesday night at a public meeting.

The basic idea is for Great Rivers Greenway to spur investment in the area by creating a continuous waterfront park along the Mississippi from Laclede’s Landing north to the Stan Musial Bridge.

More bike routes opened in St. Louis

Apr 25, 2015
Bike riders on the bike lane on Union Blvd in St. louis.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio file photo

St. Louis now has 135 miles of on-street bike routes. Cyclists and public officials celebrated the completion of the latest phase of street markings and upgrades Saturday at the Cabanne Branch of the St. Louis Public Library on Union Blvd.

Over the past seven months, Great Rivers Greenway and the City of St. Louis added 40 new miles of bike routes and upgraded an additional 60 miles of routes in the city. It’s the third phase of a partnership that began in 2004.

(Great Rivers Greenway, St. Louis Bike Share Study)

Local residents still have a chance to weigh in on a possible bike share plan for St. Louis.

Great Rivers Greenway District has been working with the City of St. Louis, St. Louis County, Metro Transit and other groups since last spring to study the feasibility of such a cycle sharing system here.

How Can St. Louis Improve Biking, Walking Access?

Aug 7, 2014
Flickr/Jeremy Noble

With the clear, warm weather of summer, more St. Louisans of all ages are taking to the streets and the sidewalks on foot and by bike. The city has plans in the works to make walking, biking and running easier, from Complete Streets to separated bike lanes.

“I think overall we have great facilities in St. Louis and there has been a lot of improvement in the five years that I’ve lived here,” said Aaron Hipp, assistant professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. His research evaluates how built communities affect the activity and health of those who use them.

Flickr/Jeremy Noble

As St. Louisans participated in National Bike to Work Day recently, a local group reflected on its efforts to make the region more bike-friendly.

Great Rivers Greenway has released a report, grading St. Louis’ progress on a region-wide bike plan. The Gateway Bike Plan would build bike routes connecting parks, universities and major public areas throughout St. Louis City, St. Louis County and St. Charles County. Other initiatives under the plan would implement policies and training programs to support bikers.

Can A Bike Sharing Program Succeed in St. Louis?

Mar 24, 2014
Flickr/Jeremy Noble

St. Louis could be the next U.S. city to host an urban bike-sharing program. Great Rivers Greenway is conducting a feasibility study to determine how successful such a program would be in the area.

“We want to look at the destinations where our residents are traveling to on a daily basis, whether that’s [to] work or shopping areas, or dining areas,” said Assistant Project Manager Elizabeth Simons. 

(via Flickr/Herkie)

A historic building along the Mississippi riverfront will likely mean more amenities next year for cyclists and pedestrians along the Riverfront Trail north of downtown.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon

Ed Lammering wore his top hat to a groundbreaking last month beside the Gateway Arch, but left his horse, Lukes, at the St. Louis Carriage Company’s stable on the other side of Busch Stadium.  He held a sign which read, “Where do we stand? – carriage drivers.”

The carriage company is among several businesses that have concerns about the impact of the $360 million CityArchRiver 2015 project. Work will include expanding the Arch grounds over Interstate 70, carving out a new central entrance for the underground museum and numerous other major improvements.

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