Guantanamo | St. Louis Public Radio


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Earlier Story:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: November 20, 2008 - Judge Richard Leon ordered five of six Algerians released.  The Algerians had been arrested in 2001 in Sarajevo for allegely plotting to blow up the U.S. embassy there.  President Bush even mentioned the plot in the 2002 State of the Union speech.  More recently, the government has dropped that claim, but maintained the men had planned to go to Afghanistan to fight with the Taliban and al-Qaida.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: October 13, 2008 - Last week, U.S. District Judge Ricardo M. Urbina ordered the release of the 17 Uighurs, who have been held for seven years at the Guantanamo Bay prison.  The judge ruled that the government no longer had a right to hold the men, having abandoned the claim that they are enemy combatants. The judge's order has been stayed by the appeals court in Washington, D.C. to give the government more time to make its case.  (Scotusblog has a good summary and background information here .)

Bin Laden's driver gets light sentence - 66 months

Aug 7, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 7, 2008 - The military panel of six officers deliberated for about an hour before returning the lighter than expected sentence for providing material support for terrorism. The government had asked for a sentence of 30 years and said that the life sentence prosecutors had sought earlier would be appropriate.  The defense recommended 45 months.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 12, 2008 - In an extraordinary rebuke to President George W. Bush and Congress, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 on Thursday that prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay have the right to go to federal court on a writ of habeas corpus. This is the third time since 9/11 that the Supreme Court has found that the president violated the law or the Constitution in limiting the opportunities of prisoners in the war on terrorism to obtain a fair hearing.