gun control

Leah Gunning Francis, second from left, locks arms with Rev. Karen Anderson, Betty Thompson, Rev. Traci Blackmon and Valerie Richmon of Austin, Tx at the front of the Mother's March on October 18, 2014.,
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is joining a legal fight to retain a criminal charge officials say is necessary to control the gun violence plaguing the city.

The city, the Archdiocese of St. Louis, SSM Healthcare, the Demetrious Johnson Charitable Foundation, and the St. Louis Regional Chamber are joining together in a amicus curiae brief (friend of the court) to the state Supreme Court. In three cases, St. Louis judges threw out unlawful possession of firearms charges based on their reading of Amendment 5.

(via Flickr/M Glasgow)

The Missouri Supreme Court has upheld a constitutional amendment that broadened gun rights in the state.

Voters approved Amendment 5 in August 2014 with 61 percent of the vote. It made the right to own firearms, ammunition and other accessories in the state "unalienable," and said any form of gun control should be subject to "strict scrutiny." The amendment also allowed the open carrying of guns.

The Supreme Court of Missouri
via Flickr | david_shane

The Missouri Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on whether voters knew enough about a constitutional amendment expanding gun rights before it was approved in 2014. 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The mayors of St. Louis and Kansas City traveled to the the Missouri Capitol Monday to speak out against legislation to nullify federal gun laws within the Show-Me State.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, a Democrat, calls the legislation  "absurd, embarrassing and reckless."

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to its version of the gun control nullification bill, but not before softening the language a bit.

(via Flickr/ M Glasgow)

Without one word of debate, the Missouri Senate Thursday passed legislation to nullify federal gun-control laws in Missouri.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has stripped an amendment from the gun-control nullification bill that would have required an individual to report a stolen gun within 72 hours.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The National Rifle Association is taking some heat from two Missouri state senators over legislation to nullify federal gun control laws within the state.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to legislation to nullify federal gun-control laws.

(via Flickr/Of Small Things)

Gun owners in Illinois who want a concealed-carry permit before April 2014 will have to file a new lawsuit in federal court.

St. Louis Public Radio

Several police departments and organizations around Missouri are speaking out against a bill that would bar enforcement of federal gun laws if they interfere with a Missourian's Second Amendment rights.

St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch says House Bill 436 would in effect end cooperation between local and federal law enforcement agencies.  He cites a recent traffic stop where his officers apprehended two armed men wanted for different crimes.

(Official Portrait, Missouri Attorney General's office)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is siding with fellow Democrat, Governor Jay Nixon, in opposition to legislation that would challenge the federal government's ability to enforce federal gun laws in Show-Me State.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Will be updated.

The Illinois House has approved a plan to allow qualified gun owners to carry their weapons in public.

The proposal adopted Friday was brokered by House Speaker Michael Madigan, but it's opposed by several of his fellow Democrats, including the governor.

Gov. Pat Quinn's office has called the plan a "massive overreach" because it would wipe out all local gun regulations, including Chicago's ban on assault-style weapons. That's a deal-breaker for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who backs tough restrictions to curb the city's gun violence.

Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio

Few things are more polarizing in American culture than guns. There is no scarcity of opinions on the issue, but a voice that we have perhaps not heard is that of a younger generation, specifically those who are 18 to 29 years old. They fall under the millennial generation, and will make up the future of gun ownership. So, what do they think? St. Louis Public Radio’s Sean Sandefur reports.

Guns Evoke Many Emotions

Blunt, McCaskill At Odds Over Background Check Bill

Apr 10, 2013
Blunt – Flickr/Gage Skidmore; McCaskill – Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill

Missouri’s U.S. Senators are divided on a bill that would expand background checks to more gun buyers. Republican Blunt has indicated that he does not support the bill, while Democrat Claire McCaskill says she will.

On a conference call with reporters on Wednesday, McCaskill said Congress needs to do something to try to prevent mass shootings.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn took his call for new state gun regulations to the church pulpit.

Quinn has been talking to church-goers about how to reduce gun violence in Chicago.

At Saint Sabina's Sunday on the city's South Side - Quinn invoked the Bible in talking about proposals like expanding background checks and banning certain guns.

"We're not going to stand by and let children and others be killed," Quinn said. "No no no. We're going to listen to what Paul said: Love is patient. Love is kind. Love never fails."

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

From a podium at Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis, Democratic Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman asked a crowd of gun-control supporters to hold up their phones and punch in a new contact, the switchboard for the U.S. Senate.

She told them to call every day, ask for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and demand that they vote in favor of universal background checks for gun sales.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Groups on both sides of the concealed carry debate in Illinois say the state is no closer to crafting a court-ordered law than they were the first day of this legislative session.

Richard Pearson is executive director of the Illinois State Rifle Association. He says lawmakers are sidelining the plan by bypassing the usual committee process:

"We've had committee meetings from one end of the state to the other, and out of this we have gotten nothing," Pearson said.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

The city council in a St. Louis area town is considering a bill that would declare any federal, state or local laws prohibiting guns to be in violation of the U.S. and Missouri constitutions, rendering them invalid in the town.
 
The measure has been proposed in O'Fallon. The Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis reports it could be the subject of a vote on March 28.
 

(via Flickr/ M Glasgow)

Enforcing new federal gun regulations could send Missouri officers to prison under a bill endorsed by a Missouri House committee.

The committee voted 9-5 on Tuesday to advance the bill that would criminalize the enforcement of federal gun control laws enacted after Jan. 1 of this year. The vote was along party lines with Republicans supporting the bill and Democrats in opposition.

The panel also advanced a bill barring federal regulation of guns that are manufactured in Missouri and remain inside the state's borders.

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