Gun Control | St. Louis Public Radio

Gun Control

In 2015, on average there is more than one mass shooting per day in the United States—and the impact of that is felt across the country. From the terror attacks in Charleston, Paris, Colorado Springs and San Bernardino to shootings closer to home, it is hard for the topic to stay off the minds of Americans these days.

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Several bills on both sides of the gun control debate are being proposed by Missouri lawmakers for next year's legislative session.

First, Senate Bill 589 would lift the current ban on bringing concealed firearms onto college campuses.  It's sponsored by Sen. Bob Dixon, R-Springfield.

Flickr | steakpinball

After every school shooting, the push to reform gun laws becomes the object of much debate. Ultimately, not much changes. Will the shooting that took place last week at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon have any different legal response? Monday’s “Legal Roundtable” discussed the subject with “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh, among other pressing legal matters of the day.

Leah Gunning Francis, second from left, locks arms with Rev. Karen Anderson, Betty Thompson, Rev. Traci Blackmon and Valerie Richmon of Austin, Tx at the front of the Mother's March on October 18, 2014.,
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is joining a legal fight to retain a criminal charge officials say is necessary to control the gun violence plaguing the city.

The city, the Archdiocese of St. Louis, SSM Healthcare, the Demetrious Johnson Charitable Foundation, and the St. Louis Regional Chamber are joining together in a amicus curiae brief (friend of the court) to the state Supreme Court. In three cases, St. Louis judges threw out unlawful possession of firearms charges based on their reading of Amendment 5.

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The Missouri Supreme Court has upheld a constitutional amendment that broadened gun rights in the state.

Voters approved Amendment 5 in August 2014 with 61 percent of the vote. It made the right to own firearms, ammunition and other accessories in the state "unalienable," and said any form of gun control should be subject to "strict scrutiny." The amendment also allowed the open carrying of guns.

The Supreme Court of Missouri
via Flickr | david_shane

The Missouri Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on whether voters knew enough about a constitutional amendment expanding gun rights before it was approved in 2014. 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The mayors of St. Louis and Kansas City traveled to the the Missouri Capitol Monday to speak out against legislation to nullify federal gun laws within the Show-Me State.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, a Democrat, calls the legislation  "absurd, embarrassing and reckless."

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to its version of the gun control nullification bill, but not before softening the language a bit.

A gun show in Houston, Texas, in 2007.
M Glasgow | Flickr

Without one word of debate, the Missouri Senate Thursday passed legislation to nullify federal gun-control laws in Missouri.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has stripped an amendment from the gun-control nullification bill that would have required an individual to report a stolen gun within 72 hours.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The National Rifle Association is taking some heat from two Missouri state senators over legislation to nullify federal gun control laws within the state.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to legislation to nullify federal gun-control laws.

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Gun owners in Illinois who want a concealed-carry permit before April 2014 will have to file a new lawsuit in federal court.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: I majored in political science as an undergraduate. In one sense, the field of study is an oxymoron because nothing is more antithetical to science than politics.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri state Sen. Brian Nieves, an outspoken leader in Jefferson City when it comes to gun rights, is attracting attention for his Oct. 12 fundraising event in Pacific that will feature a raffle for an assault rifle.

The senator is intrigued, a bit, by all the interest. "People either absolutely love the idea or absolutely hate it," said Nieves, R-Washington, in an interview. "There's very little middle ground."

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Sheriffs’ Association has become the latest law enforcement group to announce its opposition to HB436, also known as the “gun nullification bill,” leading to what some sources say may be a surge in such announcements over the next few days.

In fact, the Missouri Police Chiefs Association followed suit later Friday, saying that if Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of the bill is overridden next week, the new law "will call in question Missouri law enforcement’s ability to work in cooperation with their federal counterparts and impede local law enforcement’s ability to enforce existing laws."

St. Louis Public Radio

Several police departments and organizations around Missouri are speaking out against a bill that would bar enforcement of federal gun laws if they interfere with a Missourian's Second Amendment rights.

St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch says House Bill 436 would in effect end cooperation between local and federal law enforcement agencies.  He cites a recent traffic stop where his officers apprehended two armed men wanted for different crimes.

(Official Portrait, Missouri Attorney General's office)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is siding with fellow Democrat, Governor Jay Nixon, in opposition to legislation that would challenge the federal government's ability to enforce federal gun laws in Show-Me State.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon’s not shy about showcasing his marksmanship.

Nixon — a Democrat and native of Jefferson County — is an avid hunter. His office occasionally sends out news releases after a successful outing, which usually includes a photo with the governor smiling in front of a deer who's met its maker.

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Will be updated.

The Illinois House has approved a plan to allow qualified gun owners to carry their weapons in public.

The proposal adopted Friday was brokered by House Speaker Michael Madigan, but it's opposed by several of his fellow Democrats, including the governor.

Gov. Pat Quinn's office has called the plan a "massive overreach" because it would wipe out all local gun regulations, including Chicago's ban on assault-style weapons. That's a deal-breaker for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who backs tough restrictions to curb the city's gun violence.

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