H1N1

Flu Season
9:23 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

St. Louis Flu Cases Down After New Year Surge

via Wikimedia Commons

After spiking in early January, cases of the flu appear to have subsided in the St. Louis area.

According to the St. Louis County Health Department, the 92 influenza-like illnesses recorded for the week ending Jan. 19 was 151 fewer than the first week of January. St. Louis City numbers for last week have yet to be released.

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Flu Deaths
7:25 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Nine Deaths Linked To H1N1 Flu Virus

via Wikimedia Commons

Officials at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis say nine people have died from the H1N1 flu virus, also known as swine flu, over the past six weeks. Another 35 patients were sick enough to be treated in the hospital’s intensive care unit, although, many were transported from outside the area.

Infectious Disease Physician Steven Lawrence says those who died ranged in age from their mid-20s to their mid-60s.

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Flu Vaccine
4:40 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Not All St. Louis-Area EMTs Are Getting Vaccinated Against the Flu

(National Institutes of Health)

As many as a quarter of EMTs and other emergency medical personnel in the St. Louis area may not be getting annual flu vaccinations, according to a new study out of Saint Louis University.

Saint Louis University nurse researcher and study lead Terri Rebmann says many study participants had misconceptions about the flu vaccine.

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Flu Vaccine / Children's Medicine
4:40 pm
Tue August 16, 2011

SLU study: shot-spray combination may protect best for children's first flu vaccine

Children can receive their flu vaccinations via injection, as shown, or through a nasal spray.
(via Flickr/Daniel Paquet)

A new study out of Saint Louis University suggests that a child’s first doses of flu vaccine can be given as either two shots or two nasal sprays, but that giving one shot and one nasal spray may be most protective.

Lead researcher Dr. Dan Hoft says the nasal spray – which is a live vaccine – can cause wheezing. But it’s more effective than an inactivated vaccine, which is injected.

Hoft says this initial study suggests giving children one injection and one nasal spray may provide better protection against the flu, without the respiratory side effects.

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