Hall of Famous Missourians

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

After a controversial inductee last year, Missouri residents are being given the chance this year to nominate two of the next three inductees for the Hall of Famous Missourians.

House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka) says he made the decision to seek citizens' input, in part, to see if someone who's worthy of induction has been forgotten over time or overlooked.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The bust of radio host Rush Limbaugh is on display at the Missouri Capitol with fellow members of the Hall of Famous Missourians.

Limbaugh's bust was positioned Monday near the doors to the House chamber, across the corridor from the bust of a fellow southeastern Missourian, former Democratic Gov. Warren Hearnes.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh was inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians today, in a ceremony that was kept under wraps until less than an hour before it happened.

Word of the ceremony leaked out after various media members spotted Limbaugh inside the Missouri Capitol.  The ceremony was by invitation only, and the audience consisted of Republican lawmakers and family and friends.  Limbaugh told the audience that other members of his family were more deserving of the honor, but he also thanked House Speaker Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) for not rescinding it.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Police chief outlines plan to preserve patrol officers despite cuts

The St. Louis police chief says he’ll reduce the department’s command structure and turn some desk jobs currently held by officers over to civilians in an effort to blunt the impact of budget cuts.

Chief Dan Isom unveiled his budget plan to a Board of Aldermen committee yesterday.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Former slave Dred Scott has been inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

(screen capture)

Rumors swept the Missouri Capitol that the bust of conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh was being delivered today, along with the bust of former slave Dred Scott.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Around a hundred demonstrators rallied outside the State Capitol today to protest plans to induct conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

Limbaugh has come under fire for calling Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute" on his nationally-syndicated radio program.  Fluke had testified in favor of President Obama’s birth control policies before Congressional Democrats.  Fellow Democrat and State House Member Jeanette Mott Oxford told the crowd in Jefferson City that it would be wrong for visitors to the State Capitol to see a bust of Limbaugh in the third floor Rotunda.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Missouri House Democrats are proposing new criteria and a requirement for bipartisan approval before people are inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians - a reaction to criticism of the selection of Rush Limbaugh for the honor.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Updated 5:15 p.m. with information about Gov. Nixon's perspective.

After sending a letter Tuesday in opposition to the installation of a bust of radio broadcaster Rush Limbaugh in the Hall of Famous Missourians, Democrats in the Missouri House of Representatives have taken their opposition a step further.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

News surfaced Monday that radio commentator Rush Limbaugh is to be inducted this year in the Hall of Famous Missourians at the Missouri state Capitol. Now, Democrats in the Missouri House of Representatives have sent a letter to House Speaker Steven Tilley asking that the plans to induct Limbaugh be "abandoned."

The letter says that "Fame alone has never been considered sufficient to earn someone a place in the Hall of Famous Missourians" and that, if that were the case, "outlaws Frank and Jesse James  - two of the most famous Missourians of all time - would have been inducted long ago."

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