Hazelwood School District | St. Louis Public Radio

Hazelwood School District

Hazelwood West seniors Yonnas Wole, Richard Spivey and Mallory Bachheit talk while they wait for district administrators to respond to their call for a meeting on Thurs., May 18, 2017.
File photo | Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A semester after changes to Missouri’s criminal code sparked concern that school fights could result in felony charges, St. Louis-area school districts say there’s been little impact.

Yet, several districts have amended or are working to update discipline policies and behavior programs partly in response to the new law.

A group of Hazelwood West students protest their suspensions Thursday May 18, 2017 outside the district's administration offices.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Hazelwood school officials lifted the suspensions of nearly 200 high school students Thursday after several days of pressure from fellow students, parents and civil rights groups.

The students had been given five-day suspensions and were banned from participating in the graduation ceremony at Hazelwood West High School after they walked out of classes Monday to protest on behalf of the teachers. The teachers had been hoping to negotiate raises with the district. 

via Flickr | frankjuarez

Parents in the Hazelwood School District who were concerned that administrators are being too well compensated while other areas of the school system get cut successfully prompted a state audit of the district’s finances.

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway announced the audit Tuesday, but said it’s too early to say what her office is looking for.

Grayling Tobias, former Hazelwood superintendent
Ferguson Commission

Grayling Tobias, who has retired as superintendent of the Hazelwood school district after being placed on administrative leave, decided to give up the job to help ease continuing strife among board members, a longtime former board member said Wednesday.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Isaac dumps rain, but Mo. drought persists

The National Weather Service says large parts of rural Missouri and Illinois had between three-to-five inches of rainfall this weekend.

In St. Louis, Oakville received three and a half inches of rain, the most in the metropolitan area.  But National Weather Service Meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said it will take much more rain to snap this summer's historic drought.