Health, Science, Environment

Mississippi River Flooding
4:43 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Rising River Threatens Areas North Of St. Louis

Flooding near Clarksville in 2008
Credit St. Louis Beacon file photo

The National Weather Service is forecasting major flooding along stretches of the Mississippi River north of St. Louis early next week. A map on its site is regularly updated with river stages.

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Bridgeton Landfill
9:09 am
Thu July 3, 2014

State Concerned About Potential For Surface Fire At Bridgeton Landfill

In this diagram of landfill infrastructure, temperature monitoring probes (TMPs), gas interceptor wells (GIWs), and gas extraction wells (GEWs) are all labeled by number.
Credit Map provided by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources

Updated 7/3/14 with a link to the state's finalized Incident Management Plan for the Bridgeton Landfill.

State agency officials are concerned that the underground fire at the Bridgeton Landfill could break through to the surface.

That scenario was raised in a recent memo by landfill fire expert Todd Thalhamer, who has been consulting for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

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Coal Ash
7:42 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Missouri Public Service Commission Gives The Go-Ahead To Ameren's Coal Ash Landfill Plans

This diagram shows the design of Ameren's proposed 167-acre coal ash landfill in Labadie.
Credit Image courtesy of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources

The Missouri Public Service Commission has signed off on Ameren Missouri's plan to build a coal ash landfill at its power plant in Franklin County.

The five member commission unanimously granted the utility company’s request for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity on Wednesday. That certificate gives Ameren the ability to expand the area of its Labadie power plant to build the new landfill.

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Missouri Botanical Garden
2:01 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Stopping To Smell A Corpse (Flower) At The Botanical Garden

Izzy, the Titan Arum, or "corpse flower" bloomed Monday night at the Missouri Botanical Garden. People from all over the region came to see it and smell its nasty odor.
Credit Alan Greenblatt

You still have a few hours left to smell the corpse flower.

The Titan Arum, an Aroid plant from Sumatra, is currently in bloom at the Missouri Botanical Garden. It flowers rarely, but when it does, its strong odor definitely carries.

“It smells like rotting flesh,” said Andrew Wyatt, the Garden's vice president of horticulture. “It spreads the foul smell over many miles because it’s trying to attract pollinators from another plant several miles away.”

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On a coal barge
10:10 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Collateral Impact Of The EPA's Proposed Carbon Rule: Barge Companies Are Already Adapting

Train cars of coal at ACL's St. Louis coal terminal will be dumped out and put on Louisiana-bound barges.
Credit Jess Jiang / St. Louis Public Radio

Historically, the nation's barges have transported much of the nation's coal. In fact, barges are second only behind rail for moving the nation's primary energy source to the power plants that use it.  But in June, the EPA put out a new rule to cut carbon emissions by thirty percent by 2030. The rule's impact on power plants is direct. But what about the impact on the barge industry?  

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Bioscience
5:41 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Study: Missouri Spends Lion's Share Of Research Funds On Bioscience

Credit breahn / Flickr

Missouri spends a greater share of its academic research money on biosciences than any other state in the nation, according to the latest study from Battelle and the Biotechnology Industry Organization.

The study finds that, in 2012, the state’s research universities devoted 85 percent, or about $895 million dollars, to academic bioscience research, compared with 61 percent for the national average.

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St. Louis On The Air
6:15 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Local Journalist Details Missouri's Environmental Issues in New Book

Don Corrigan also discussed issues with the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill during the conversation and in his book.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

 Missourians need to be worried – and need to act.

That is the message of Environmental Missouri: Issues and Sustainability — What You Need to Know, a new book from Webster University journalism professor and Times Newspapers editor Don Corrigan.  The book is an overview of various aspects of our environment and sustainability shortfalls – in addition to what we are doing right.

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West Lake Landfill
1:16 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

EPA Says Radiation Screening Suggests Bridgeton Athletic Complex "Suitable For Public Use"

Diagram showing gamma radiation measurements on grassy areas at BMAC. Detections are shown in blue and green. No measurements were more than twice the mean, the level at which EPA Region 7 typically conducts further investigation.
U.S. EPA Region 7

Preliminary radiation screening at the Bridgeton Municipal Athletic Complex (BMAC) suggests the ball fields do not pose a risk to public health.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released the results on Thursday.

The athletic fields are less than a mile from the West Lake Landfill, an EPA Superfund site containing radioactive waste.

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Air Pollution - Climate Change
5:41 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

St. Louis NAACP Says Shifting From Coal To Renewables Would Benefit African Americans

St. Louis NAACP President Adolphus Pruitt spoke at a rally on Wednesday organized by the Sierra Club in support of taking action to prevent climate change. Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed (behind Pruitt) was also among the speakers.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

The local NAACP says air pollution from coal-fired power plants is having a disproportionate impact on the health of African Americans in the St. Louis area.

The civil rights organization joined the Sierra Club, Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed and others on Wednesday to rally in favor of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed limits on carbon dioxide emissions.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:46 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Are You Ready To Live Until You’re 100 or 120? You Just May Need To Be

American Edna Parker was the oldest living person in the world when she died in 2008. In this 2007 photo she was 114.
Credit via Wikimedia Commons

According to the Pew Research Center, hundreds of thousands of Americans could live to see 100 by the year 2050. Women in France, Japan and the United States have already lived past the age of 114. With the now realistic possibility that individuals may live into the triple digits, planning ahead for retirement becomes both more important, and more challenging.

Living Longer

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