Health, Science, Environment

Jewish Hospital
9:35 am
Sun March 2, 2014

An Update On the 'Bittersweet Progress' At The Site Of The Old Jewish Hospital

A view of the demolition from the 16th floor of a nearby building on Feb. 28, 2014. The white sheeting limits the amount of noise and dust that reach the working hospital next door.
Rachel Lippmann I St. Louis Public Radio

Back in May, hundreds of former employees of the old Jewish Hospital gathered at the complex  along Kingshighway to say goodbye. Three of the four  buildings - some of which were built in the early 1900s - were schedule to come down as part of a multi-million dollar project to upgrade the Barnes-Jewish medical facilities.

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Obituary
11:11 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Frank O. Richards, M.D.: A Man Of Firsts

Dr. Frank O. Richards
Wiley Price

Dr. Frank Richards, who built a reputation as one of the most proficient surgeons ever to don a mask because of his ability to operate with one hand while holding instruments in the other, died Thursday.

“No one could do that but Frank,” said Will Ross, M.D., associate dean for diversity and associate professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine. “When he was assistant director of Homer G. Phillips Hospital, he really had to move patients in and out; it was a high-volume operation.”

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Biomedical Engineering
10:00 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Wash U, U of I Scientists Use 3-D Printer To Help Create Prototype Next-Gen Pacemaker

This photo shows the new cardiac device ― a thin, elastic membrane ― fitted over a rabbit's heart. The membrane is imprinted with a network of electrodes that can monitor cardiac function and deliver an electrical impulse to correct an erratic heartbeat.
Credit University of Illinois and Washington University

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new device that may one day help prevent heart attacks.

Unlike existing pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that are one-size-fits-all, the new device is a thin, elastic membrane designed to stretch over the heart like a custom-made glove.

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Quality Index
10:37 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Science & Health Rundown: The Air We Breathe

YES student Aleah Brooks at the St. Louis Science Center Ozone Garden, 2013
Credit Provided by Saint Louis University

It’s a stretch to think about summer now. 

But close your eyes and imagine.

The sun is shining; bees are buzzing; your arms move through warm air; you even have to mop a thin veil of perspiration from your brow. And on the news in the morning, Geri Mitchell intones the familiar admonition: “It’s a red air quality day. Sensitive groups should avoid exercising outdoors.”

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Health & Science
10:52 am
Fri February 21, 2014

New Bridgeton Landfill Data Suggest Underground Fire Still Far From Radioactive Waste

Map shows concentrations of carbon monoxide collected from gas extraction wells at the Bridgeton Landfill on January 24. Readings above 1,000 ppm indicate an underground fire. Radioactive waste is located north of the wells shown in purple.
Credit Republic Services

Updated on 2/23/14 to correct the date of the 2013 CO measurements, and on 2/21/14 to add a data table from MDNR and more characterization of the recent CO measurements.

New monitoring data from the Bridgeton Landfill suggest that an underground fire has not spread toward radioactive waste to the north.

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Therapy Rabbits
10:58 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

St. Louis Rabbits Live A Therapy Dog’s Life With A Mardi Gras Flair

Support rabbits are gentle visitors to residents of Tower Grove Manor.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

Some St. Louis rabbits are working like dogs as service and therapy animals. On Sunday, one will also don another hat – more of a crown, really for the Mardi Gras Pet Parade.

It’s not uncommon to see service dogs assisting vision- or hearing-impaired individuals. But a St. Louis woman named Nisha Full Moon uses a Flemish Giant rabbit as a service animal.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:26 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

How Much Screen Time Is Too Much For Kids?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no more than two hours of screen time a day for children over the age of two.
(KOMU via Flickr)

At every well-child visit SLUCare pediatrician Matt Broom conducts, he asks two questions. First he asks about the amount of time the child spends in front of screens each day. Then he asks whether or not the child has a television and Internet connectivity in his or her bedroom.

The goal, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is to keep screen time in communal areas and limit screen time to two hours a day. For children under the age of two, the Academy recommends no screen time at all.

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for sake of all
4:04 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Public Comment Encouraged On 'For The Sake Of All' Research

For the Sake of All researchers explored how the health of African Americans is affected by a variety of social, economic and geographical factors.
Credit Nanette Hegamin

Scholars involved in a five-part study that examines the well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region will seek public feedback on their research during a forum on March 3 at the Forest Park Visitor Center. The session, from 2 to 5 p.m., is free, but participants must sign up through the event registration page.

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AAAS Annual Meeting
11:16 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

St. Louisans Among Presenters At National Science Conference In Chicago

Credit American Association for the Advancement of Science

The American Association for the Advancement of Science is wrapping up its annual meeting Monday in Chicago.

Among the presenters were researchers from Washington University and the vice president of the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

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Danforth Center
11:15 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Commentary: Drive To Understand Can Help Hold Off Potential Environmental Disaster

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
Credit Provided by the center

Condensed from the State of the Center report to the community.

When we started, I dreamed, perhaps romantically, that our center would be part of a major human adventure of the 21st century. We would try to make the most of the wonderful human desire to know how the world really works, in our case how plants really work. This drive to understand, shaped through its evermore powerful modern offspring, science, can help hold off potential environmental disaster. In doing so, we hoped also to bring benefits and perhaps even a little credit to our home community.

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