Health, Science, Environment

Health, Science, Environment
4:08 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

What Is Ichthyosis And Why Has It Led One St. Louisan To Hike 2,600 Miles?

Brian Gass on the Pacific Crest Trail
Courtesy of Brian Gass

 Brian Gass is a bit different than many of the people he encounters hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. He spends a lot more time concerned with his skin. Gass has ichthyosis, a rare genetic skin disease that manifests itself as thickening or thinning of the skin, sometimes giving a scaly appearance or becoming very dry, flaky and itchy. For Gass, it requires copious amounts of lotion, long-sleeves, and frequent night-hiking to avoid the sun. Gass talked to St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh earlier this week from Lake Tahoe.  

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LGBT Center
1:15 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

St. Louis’ LGBT Center Set To Reopen By January With Expanded Services

Board president Dara Strickland
Credit LGBT Center

Organizers of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Center of St. Louis plan to open their doors in a new spot by by Jan. 1.

They're looking to buy their own building. The wish list includes a space four times the size of the approximately 2,000 square-foot location they were renting at 4337 Manchester Ave. in The Grove.

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EPA Carbon Rules
4:28 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Proposed EPA Rules Get Missouri Lawmakers Talking About Carbon Emissions

Credit Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers are sounding off on proposed Environmental Protection Agency rules aimed at reducing carbon emissions.  

The proposed rules effectively provide individual states with options to reduce carbon emissions by 2030. These options include making facilities more energy efficient, investing in alternative energy sources like solar and wind power, or joining other states in “cap and trade” programs.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:31 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Discussion: Can 'For The Sake Of All' Report Change Policy In St. Louis?

Credit Courtesy For the Sake of All

Final Report: For the Sake of All

At the end of May, the "For the Sake of All" research team published its final report on the health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region, a multi-disciplinary study led by  Jason Purnell, an assistant professor with the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Climate Change — Air Pollution
8:38 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

National Analysis Suggests Cutting Carbon Dioxide Would Improve Air Quality In Missouri

Coal-fired power plants produce pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury.
Credit Syracuse University News Services

Cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants would also reduce other types of air pollution, both here in Missouri and nationally.

That's according to a recent analysis by researchers at Harvard and Syracuse Universities.

Along with carbon dioxide, coal-fired power plants emit other pollutants, like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Those in turn can contribute to forming particle pollution, ozone, and smog.

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Chronic Wasting Disease
6:01 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Missouri Conservation Commission Tries To Stop Chronic Wasting Disease In Wild Deer

Credit (via Flickr/Ian Sane)

Missouri's Conservation Commission voted unanimously Friday to adopt a list of recommendations designed to prevent the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD, from captive white tail deer to the wild population.

The recommendations primarily target privately owned fields, pens and reserves where trophy deer are raised to be hunted.  Mike Hubbard, chief of the Department of Conservation's (MDC) Resource Science Division, says the recommendations include banning the import of white tail deer, mule deer and their hybrids into Missouri.

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Cancer Treatment
10:43 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Scientists Confirm 'Chemobrain' Is Real, Patients Find Validation

Dr. Bradley Schlaggar and his colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize "chemobrain," a phenomenon that many patients receiving chemotherapy describe as a "mental fog."
Credit Bradley Schlaggar

  

Most people have heard about the undesirable side effects that chemotherapy has on the body of people suffering from cancer. There's balding, fatigue and loss of appetite, to name a few.

Until recently, however, chemotherapy’s effects on the brain weren’t widely recognized. The cognitive side effects – a  fuzzy memory and poor attention span – were usually dismissed by physicians, scientists and even some cancer patients.

The symptoms have a name: Post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, or “chemobrain,” among those who suffer from it.

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Disease Outbreak
5:04 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Wash Your Hands, People!

Thorough hand washing with soap and water is the best way to prevent the spread of shigellosis.
Credit U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Saint Louis County is seeing an unusual spike in a bacterial disease that affects children in daycare centers.

The county has received 71 reports of shigellosis since the start of 2014 ― that’s compared to only a couple of cases in the same time period last year.

Dr. Faisal Khan, the St. Louis County Department of Health's director of communicable disease control, said the disease has obvious symptoms.

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Antibiotic Resistance
10:16 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

A Freezer At Washington University May Hold The Key To Developing New Antibiotics

Patient Hazel Watson with her infectious disease doctor, Erik Dubberke. The bacteria Watson has is resistant against all but one antibiotic.
Credit Jess Jiang / St. Louis Public Radio

Super bugs — those bacterial diseases that are resistant to antibiotics — are growing, according to a recent World Health Organization report. Not only are the bugs getting stronger, the report explains, but pharmaceutical companies are also not developing enough new antibiotics to replace the ones that become ineffective. As a result, patients are suffering as the arsenal of antibiotics to fight infections dwindles.

Hazel Watson is one of those people.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:24 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Going Green At Home With Native Plants: Tips To Build Native Habitats Into Your Landscaping

Purple coneflowers are native to Missouri.
Credit Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanical Garden annual Green Homes Festival is this Saturday at the Kemper Center for Home Gardening. One of the focuses of this year’s festival is gardening with native plants, or “naturescaping.”

Using native plants is environmentally friendly because it works within the existing ecosystem, explained Jean Ponzi, Green Resources Manager at the EarthWays Center of the Missouri Botanical Garden.

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