Health, Science, Environment | St. Louis Public Radio

Health, Science, Environment

Health, science, and environmental news

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Green choices often begin at home. When David A. Mollerus, a Southern Baptist, completes his commute from work, he tosses aside his car keys and runs, or walks, to do his errands. His home in New Town of St. Charles is a short walk to a dry cleaner, a grocery, a gym, a farmer's market and a beautiful lake. He bought a home in the densely planned "New Urbanism" community two years ago, in part, to lessen his carbon footprint. 

Is Earth Day still needed?

Apr 16, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Twenty million Americans celebrated the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970. That massive outpouring of activism forced politicians to pay attention to the environment and resulted in the founding of the Environmental Protection Agency and the passing or strengthening of laws regulating clean air, clean water and endangered species. In just a few years, this grassroots, democratic action made the United States a world leader in environmental protection.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Fisher House Foundation plans to break ground in late summer or fall for a 21-bedroom facility at Jefferson Barracks that will provide free lodging for veterans who must travel great distances for medical treatment at the St. Louis VA Medical Center, said foundation spokesman Jim Weiskopf.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Across the country, evangelical Christians are going green. To be sure, many are still leery about jumping onto a bandwagon already filled with — in their view — ultraliberal, even "unwashed," activists. Yet, in recent months, several national evangelical leaders have urged their fellow believers to protect the environment.

Copyright George Johnson | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: 50 million Americans smoke cigarettes. Although smoking has decreased in recent years, 24 percent of Missourians still light up.

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