Health, Science, Environment

Carter Carburetor
5:19 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Toxic Carter Carburetor Site In North St. Louis To Be Cleaned Up -- At Last

EPA Regional Administrator Karl Brooks (at podium) speaks at the Carter Carburetor announcement in St. Louis on July 29, 2013.
(Sarah Skiöld-Hanlin/St. Louis Public Radio)

A toxic eyesore in North St. Louis is finally going to be cleaned up.

The old Carter Carburetor Superfund site on North Grand Boulevard will undergo a long-awaited $30 million remediation, the Environmental Protection Agency announced on Monday.

The cleanup is the result of separate settlement agreements between the EPA and Carter Building, Inc., and ACF Industries, LLC. The two companies will cover most of the costs of the remediation.

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Science
9:39 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Pioneering Sex Researcher Virginia Johnson Is Dead At 88

Virginia Johnson, of the famed sexual research duo Masters and Johnson, has died at the age of 88.
(Courtesy Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine)

Updated 10:52 a.m., 11:33 a.m., 11:53 a.m., 12:11 p.m., and 4 p.m. May be updated further.

Virginia Johnson, one half of the famed Masters and Johnson research team on human sexual behavior, has died at the age of 88, her son Scott tells St. Louis Public Radio.

Johnson was a resident of The Altenheim senior living community in St. Louis. The facility has also confirmed her death.

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Ameren - Coal Ash
5:33 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

National Report Condemns Coal Ash Water Pollution From Ameren's Labadie Plant

Residents of Saint Louis, Franklin County and Jefferson County staged a “Miss and Mr. Toxic Water Pollution” pageant on the banks of the Mississippi River on Tuesday to draw attention to the issue of water contamination from Missouri's coal-fired power plants.
Credit Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio

A new report released Tuesday by a coalition of environmental groups focuses on the need to revamp national water pollution standards for coal-fired power plants.

The report cites Ameren's Labadie power plant in Franklin County as one of the worst waterway polluters in the nation.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:54 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

She’s Back! Following Up On ‘Following In Darwin’s Footsteps’

St. Louis Public Radio's Véronique LaCapra reports from the Galapagos Islands
St. Louis Public Radio

Last month, St. Louis Public Radio's science reporter Véronique LaCapra set off on a trip to the Galapagos Islands.

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Science
3:53 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Black Bears Are Back In Missouri, But Where Are They Coming From?

Credit (via Flickr/solviturambulando)

Black bears can now be found in southern Missouri, thanks to a reintroduction program more than fifty years ago.

The University of Missouri has worked in conjunction with other researchers to trace the origins of the bears.

Researchers used genetic footprints and hair samples to identify which bears came from reintroduced groups in Arkansas, and which were indigenous. 

Washington University researcher Kaitlyn Faries did research on the bears at MU during initial studies in 2007.

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EPA Funding
5:57 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Missouri Authorities Awarded $1.6 M To Redevelop Brownfields

Credit (via Environmental Protection Agency)

Three Missouri agencies will receive $1.6 million in federal funds to cleanup and redevelop contaminated properties.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced this week that it has selected public authorities in St. Louis, Springfield and Jefferson City, to receive the funding as part of its $15 million supplemental revolving loan funds (RLF).

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The Salt
2:00 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply.
Natalie Behring Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 3:34 pm

The strange case of genetically engineered wheat on a farm in Oregon remains as mysterious as ever. If anything, it's grown more baffling.

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Science
3:33 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Do Dogs Think?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 10:21 pm

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West Nile Virus
2:39 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Illinois' First Case Of West Nile In Birds Found In Monroe County

Mosquito feeding on a human finger.
Credit (via Center for Disease Control and Prevention)

Illinois' first case this year of West Nile virus in a bird has been confirmed. According to the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) the infected starling was collected by the Monroe County Health Department on June 27 in Waterloo, Ill.

This pattern of detection is part of an annual trend seen by health officials in which the West Nile virus is first detected in mosquitoes, followed by birds, and then, people. No cases have been reported so far this year in humans. However, according to health officials, it is only a matter of time before a person is infected.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:05 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Medical Advice For Living A Lengthier And Happier Life

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

Modern medical science has brought us closer than ever to the so-called Fountain of Youth.  Advances in our understanding of what it takes to live a lengthier and happier life have allowed us to do just that.

Host Don Marsh talked with Dr. John Morley, Director of the Division of Geriatric Medicine at Saint Louis University.

Among other things, they discussed work Morley recently authored about everyone older than seventy getting screened for frailty, a problem that affects between 5 and 10 percent of those in that age group.

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