Health, Science, Environment

Transplant Helps Diabetics
6:37 am
Thu December 23, 2010

Double transplant improves quality of life for some diabetics

Tiffany Buchta, one month after her kidney-pancreas transplant. [NOTE TO VIEWER: The other photos in this slideshow are of Tiffany’s transplant surgery.] (Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

Type 2 diabetes – the kind related to obesity and an unhealthy diet – gets a lot of attention these days. But there’s another, less common, form of the disease – type 1 – that can also lead to life-threatening complications.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra takes us behind the scenes at a local hospital, for the transplant operation that got one St. Louis-area woman off dialysis, and made her diabetes-free.

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Biotech Agriculture
12:52 pm
Fri December 17, 2010

USDA: Monsanto’s genetically-engineered alfalfa is safe to plant (but maybe not everywhere)

Alfalfa fields in Idaho. (Flickr Creative Commons user Sam Beebe/Ecotrust)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has decided Monsanto’s Roundup Ready alfalfa is safe to plant but may need some restrictions.

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Saint Louis Zoo
9:58 am
Fri December 17, 2010

Peek-a-roo! Kanga-baby emerges at the zoo

Nokopo peeks out from her mother's pouch during feeding time at the Saint Louis Zoo. (Ray Meibaum/Saint Louis Zoo)

A baby kangaroo has begun poking her head out from her mother's pouch at the Saint Louis Zoo.

The female Matschie's tree kangaroo was born six months ago. Hidden in the pouch, she has grown from the size of a lima bean to the size of a small cat.

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Coal Landfill in Franklin County
5:32 pm
Tue December 14, 2010

Ameren to build coal ash landfill in Missouri River floodplain? No way, say Franklin County residents.

This diagram is an excerpt of “figure 1” from Ameren’s “Detailed Site Investigation”, showing the location of the company’s proposed coal ash landfill near Labadie, Missouri.
(Ameren Missouri website)

Ameren operates a coal-fired power plant in Labadie, Mo., about 35 miles west of St. Louis, and wants to build a 400-acre landfill near the plant to store coal waste.

Some Franklin County residents are definitely not happy about a possible landfill in the Missouri River floodplain and the effects it might have on drinking water.

Tonight they will once again be voicing their opposition to proposed regulations that would allow Ameren to go ahead with their plan.

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Children's Health
5:21 pm
Thu December 9, 2010

St. Louis joins National Children's Study of health

Louise Flick, DrPH, principal investigator for the National Children’s Study Gateway Study Center and professor at SLU School of Public Health, Edwin Trevathan, M.D., MPH, dean of SLU’s School of Public Health (center), & Craig Schmid, St. Louis Alderman
Chad Williams, Saint Louis University Medical Center

St. Louis is joining the National Children's Study, the largest long-term study of child health ever conducted in the United States.

The study will follow 100,000 children nationwide from before birth to age 21.

Local study leader Louise Flick of Saint Louis University's School of Public Health says more than 4,000 children from St. Louis City, Jefferson County, and southwestern Illinois will be asked to participate.

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Health
10:35 am
Wed December 8, 2010

“Whooping cough” on the rise in St. Louis County

Vaccination can help protect against pertussis.
Judy Schmidt, James Gathany CDC

Saint Louis County is seeing a surge in cases of pertussis.

More commonly known as “whooping cough,” pertussis is highly contagious, spreading through the air via small droplets when infected people cough, sneeze or talk.

One hundred and eighty-five cases have been reported in the county so far this year – two-thirds of them in the past six weeks.

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Science
10:46 am
Thu December 2, 2010

Federal judge to Monsanto: Yank the sugar beets out

A sugar beet.
(Flickr Creative Commons User Mindy.Kotaska)

Monsanto's latest lawsuit is no small potatoes - in fact, it's sugar beets.

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Children's Health
8:54 am
Wed December 1, 2010

Confusing labeling on liquid medications could put kids at risk

(Flickr Creative Commons user whiskeyandtears)

A new study has found that over-the-counter children's medications aren't labeled the way they should be.

The research led by the New York University School of Medicine examined two-hundred top-selling liquid medications for children, to see whether they included a dosing device, like a cup, spoon, or syringe.

If they did, the researchers compared the measurement markings on the device to the dosing instructions on the product's label.

Lead author Dr. Shonna Yin says about a quarter of the products had no dosing device at all.

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