Health, Science, Environment

Children's Health
5:21 pm
Thu December 9, 2010

St. Louis joins National Children's Study of health

Louise Flick, DrPH, principal investigator for the National Children’s Study Gateway Study Center and professor at SLU School of Public Health, Edwin Trevathan, M.D., MPH, dean of SLU’s School of Public Health (center), & Craig Schmid, St. Louis Alderman
Chad Williams, Saint Louis University Medical Center

St. Louis is joining the National Children's Study, the largest long-term study of child health ever conducted in the United States.

The study will follow 100,000 children nationwide from before birth to age 21.

Local study leader Louise Flick of Saint Louis University's School of Public Health says more than 4,000 children from St. Louis City, Jefferson County, and southwestern Illinois will be asked to participate.

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Health
10:35 am
Wed December 8, 2010

“Whooping cough” on the rise in St. Louis County

Vaccination can help protect against pertussis.
Judy Schmidt, James Gathany CDC

Saint Louis County is seeing a surge in cases of pertussis.

More commonly known as “whooping cough,” pertussis is highly contagious, spreading through the air via small droplets when infected people cough, sneeze or talk.

One hundred and eighty-five cases have been reported in the county so far this year – two-thirds of them in the past six weeks.

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Science
10:46 am
Thu December 2, 2010

Federal judge to Monsanto: Yank the sugar beets out

A sugar beet.
(Flickr Creative Commons User Mindy.Kotaska)

Monsanto's latest lawsuit is no small potatoes - in fact, it's sugar beets.

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Children's Health
8:54 am
Wed December 1, 2010

Confusing labeling on liquid medications could put kids at risk

(Flickr Creative Commons user whiskeyandtears)

A new study has found that over-the-counter children's medications aren't labeled the way they should be.

The research led by the New York University School of Medicine examined two-hundred top-selling liquid medications for children, to see whether they included a dosing device, like a cup, spoon, or syringe.

If they did, the researchers compared the measurement markings on the device to the dosing instructions on the product's label.

Lead author Dr. Shonna Yin says about a quarter of the products had no dosing device at all.

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