Health, Science, Environment

Nuclear Waste
9:15 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Missouri Environmental Group Sues Over Long-Term Risks Of Nuclear Waste

Ameren's Callaway Nuclear Reactor is the only commercial nuclear power plant in Missouri.
Credit Missouri Coalition for the Environment

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment is one of several groups filing suit against the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to try to get the agency to address the long-term storage of nuclear waste.

That suit follows similar cases filed by the states of New York, Connecticut, and Vermont, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the Prairie Island Indian Community in Minnesota.

Read more
Health, Science, Environment
5:00 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Tree Removal At Arch Grounds Will Let History Take Root

The trees that are slated for removal on the Arch grounds are marked with a pink ribbon.
Credit Rebecca Smith/St. Louis Public Radio

The National Park Service will start removing 1,200 trees on the Gateway Arch grounds in earnest on Monday. 

The removal is part of a years-long project by CityArchRiver to renovate the popular tourist attraction, and it could start as early as Friday, according to the group's communications director Ryan McClure. He said the first few trees are coming down Friday to move in construction equipment.

Read more
Cognitive Neuroscience
10:03 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

This Is Your Brain...At The Movies

Jeffrey Zacks' forthcoming book, "Flicker: Your Brain on Movies," explores how our experience watching film co-opts the mechanisms our brains evolved for understanding the real world.
Credit Oxford University Press

Movies can sometimes feel very real, bringing up emotions and even physical reactions as we watch them.

Washington University cognitive neuroscientist Jeffrey Zacks studies how the brain processes visual imagery, including what we see on film.

According to Zacks, movies hijack the parts of our brains that trigger our emotional responses and overstimulate them.

Read more
Gun violence
5:09 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

On Track To Surpass Last Year: St. Louis Reaches 120 Homicides Over the Weekend

A file photo of a crime scene in St. Louis.
Credit Rachel Lippmann / St. Louis Public Radio

A grandmother walking home from the store with her grandchildren. An Ethiopian refugee who worked as a convenience store clerk. A brother and a sister, killed three hours apart.

With a little more than two months left in the year, the city of St. Louis has already reached 120 homicides, the total number of murders reported in all of 2013.

That’s 120 victim’s families, assailant’s families, and neighborhood blocks that will never be the same, said James Clark.

Read more
Clean Water Act
6:44 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

EPA Approves Missouri's New Water Quality Standards, But Do They Go Far Enough?

The Current and Jacks Fork Rivers in the Missouri Ozarks are among the most pristine in the state. The U.S. EPA has recommended that Missouri designate waters with particularly diverse or rare aquatic species as "exceptional aquatic habitat," which would provide them with a higher level of protection.
Credit National Parks Service

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has signed off on a major overhaul of Missouri's water quality standards.

The state approved the new regulations in November but needed federal approval to start enforcing them.

Read more
For the Sake of All
11:05 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Call To Action: Improve Health By Reducing Economic Disparity, Panel Says

A graphic included in the For The Sake of All report shows the economic divide along Delmar Blvd in St. Louis.
Credit For the Sake of All

The numbers tell the story: unemployment among African Americans in St. Louis is 17.6 percent, four times that of whites.

And the unemployment rate is important because unemployment turns out to be a major factor in severe health disparities in the region, according to research by the “For the Sake of All” study.

Read more
Pesticides
5:34 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Monsanto To Keep Selling Pesticide-Coated Seeds EPA Says Don't Help Yields ― And May Harm Bees

This blueberry bee, photographed at the Missouri Botanical Garden on Mar. 25, 2012, was the first recorded in Saint Louis since the 1930s.
Credit Ed Spevak|Saint Louis Zoo

Monsanto will continue selling soybean seeds coated with pesticides that have been linked to honey bee deaths, even though the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found the seeds do not improve yields.

The seeds in question are treated with a class of chemicals called neonicotinoids, which are chemically similar to nicotine.

Read more
Missouri Deer Population
9:16 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Missouri Deer Populations Recovering After Disease Outbreaks

According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, the deer population will offer plenty of hunting opportunities this year, as numbers are recovering from disease outbreaks across the state.
Credit Noppadol Paothong, Missouri Department of Conservation

It's good news for hunters, but maybe bad news for drivers: the Missouri Department of Conservation says the state will see a pretty good deer population this year.

Many parts of the state should see a "large and healthy deer herd" this season, after years of declining populations, according to the department's Jim Low. He estimates the state has more than a million deer, offering "plenty of deer hunting opportunity out there."

Recovery from disease

Read more
Health, Science, Environment
6:33 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Nurses Union Says Ebola Prep Inadequate in St. Louis

Credit (National Institutes of Health)

As concerns over Ebola grow around the country, unionized nurses in St. Louis are asking for full-body hazmat suits with respirators and for additional training. They are also requesting that the treatment of patients diagnosed with the virus be voluntary--an extremely unusual request.

Seven members of National Nurses United [NNU] spoke with reporters outside Saint Louis University Hospital on Monday. NNU published their demands with a petition after two Dallas nurses contracted Ebola while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, the first patient diagnosed in the U.S.

Read more
Environment
7:54 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Volunteers Clean Up River Des Peres Watershed

Chris Weiss and John Koch load tires into a trailer at Gravois Creek near Grant's Trail on Saturday, October 18, 2014.
Credit Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

As water flows south through the River des Peres Watershed in St. Louis, trash, tires and metal gets deposited along the way. Over the weekend, hundreds of volunteers worked to pick up all that trash during the sixth annual cleanup called the River des Peres Trash Bash.

At Gravois Creek on Saturday morning, about a dozen volunteers stacked muddy tires into a trailer hitched to a four-wheeler.

Earlier, volunteers had fished the tires out of the creek using canoes. By mid-morning, volunteer Doug Geist estimated that they had collected more than twenty tires.

Read more

Pages