Health, Science, Environment

Health, science, and environmental news

Richard von Glahn explains the plan to canvass in House Speaker John Diehl's district as Judith Parker and Andrew Westbrook look on.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

Advocates continue to push for the expansion of Medicaid to include Missourians who fall in the so-called “coverage gap.”

Because Missouri has so far opted out of Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, thousands of Missourians fall into a gap -- they make too much money to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough to qualify for federal aid on the healthcare exchange.

State legislators have made it clear that expansion is unlikely to happen this year either.

But Medicaid advocate Richard von Glahn remains optimistic.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse – St. Louis is airing an anti-heroin ad (still shot shown) locally during the Super Bowl this Sunday.
Courtesy National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse – St. Louis Area

Among the much-anticipated Super Bowl commercials airing Sunday will be an anti-heroin ad created by a St. Louis area non-profit and a local ad agency.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse–St. Louis Area created the ad with the help of Schupp Consulting and local director Scott Ferguson to bring attention the region's growing heroin problem.

State of Rhode Island Division of Planning

Time is running out to provide input on Missouri’s state energy plan.

The public comment period officially ends on Saturday, although the online form will likely remain available at least through the weekend.

Lewis Mills directs the state Division of Energy, which is developing the plan. He said so far, public comments have centered on a handful of themes.

Jenell Wright (front row, in blue) and Meagan Beckermann (second row, in light blue) were among the crowd of more than 100 that gathered to listen to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 1/29/15 after the meeting

More than a hundred people packed into a room at the Hazelwood Civic Center East Thursday night to hear the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers talk about its cleanup of St. Louis radioactive waste sites.

PLOS ONE

A new analysis led by Washington University has shown a possible link between exposure to certain common, long-lasting chemicals and the earlier onset of menopause.

The researchers analyzed information from 1,442 menopausal women who had been tested for what are known as endocrine disrupting chemicals -- chemicals that can affect how hormones work in the body. The data were collected between 1999 and 2008 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of a national health and nutrition study.

For more than a year, researchers from Washington University and Saint Louis University worked together to study the health and well-being of African-Americans in St. Louis.

Through the For the Sake of All study, researchers released five briefs. A “St. Louis on the Air” series examined each of those briefs.

A new report shows Missouri's unintended pregnancy rate has dropped. Some researchers say it could be due to increased usage of long-lasting contraceptives like IUDs.
(Via Wikimedia Commons/Victor byckttor)

A new study released Monday shows Missouri saw a significant decrease in unintended pregnancies in recently measured years.

President and CEO, Maryann Reese, stands in front of St. Elizabeth's Hospital in downtown Belleville, IL. The current building was completed in 1954.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

A state board has issued an initial denial to St. Elizabeth’s Hospital’s attempt to move from downtown Belleville to nearby O’Fallon.  

Last week, NPR's "Morning Edition" aired a segment about echolocation. It's the way bats are able to navigate via sound waves, and it's possible for people to learn the same trick.

Daniel Kish is a developmental psychologist in California. He lost both of his eyes as a toddler due to cancer.

Rachel Bingham, a single mother, earns too much to qualify for Medicaid, but too little to afford health insurance for herself and her daughter.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

While rolling silverware at the City Diner in St. Louis, waitress Rachel Bingham recalled her attempt to buy health insurance for herself and her five-year-old daughter last year. She said when she signed on to Healthcare.gov, she realized she couldn't afford it. 

"They were wanting $231 a month. That was not doable," Bingham said. She’s been paying out-of-pocket for doctor’s appointments ever since: $60 for primary care, $200 for the dentist. Luckily, her daughter’s a healthy kid, she said.

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