Health, Science, Environment

St. Louis on the Air
12:00 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Major Players Discuss Bridgeton And West Lake Landfills

The cap over the Bridgeton Landfill was added by Republic Services to help reduce odor.
MDNR

There is increasing concern about the status of two landfills in Bridgeton as a slow-moving underground fire in the Bridgeton Landfill edges towards the adjacent West Lake Landfill. Radioactive waste left over from World War II was illegally dumped at West Lake in the 1970s.

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The Rundown
11:42 pm
Sun March 23, 2014

Health, Science, Environment Rundown: Spring Fling

Spring is springing.
Credit (UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Last week, people all over St. Louis – and all over the Midwest and East Coast, probably – celebrated the official start of spring. They celebrated because the winter has been unusually long and cold and, somehow, darker than usual. And they celebrated with a tinge of worry that the brutal winter could give way to an equally brutal, hot summer.

If that does happen, be prepared for a lot of talk about climate change. 

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Bridgeton, West Lake Landfills
10:22 am
Fri March 21, 2014

EPA To Contract With Army Corps To Build Fire Break At Bridgeton Landfill

This radiation warning sign is posted on the perimeter fence of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo.
Credit Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it is contracting with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to build a fire break to keep an underground fire from reaching radioactive waste at the landfill complex in Bridgeton.

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Rural medicine
10:13 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Building A Pipeline Of Doctors To Help The Shortage In Missouri's Rural Communities

The University of Missouri system is working to fill the shortage of rural doctors with a pipeline students who come from rural areas.
Credit (Credit: University of Missouri Health System)

Part three of three

For someone who was clueless about what he wanted to do after finishing high school, Luke Stephens has done quite well in life. 

He’s now Dr. Luke Stephens, with a degree in cell and molecular biology from Missouri State University in 2004, and a medical degree from the University of Missouri at Columbia.

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Obituary
10:52 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Rodney M. Coe: Saint Louis University Sociologist Promoted Community Service For Physicians

Rodney Michael Coe
Credit Provided by Saint Louis University

Rodney Coe, a sociologist who led Saint Louis University’s Department of Family and Community Medicine for a decade, wanted medical students to be more than healers with a great bedside manner. He wanted them to know and understand the communities they would be serving. A medical school program that bears his name made his hope a reality.

“He was very proud of that,” said his wife, Elaine Coe.

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Challenges to rural health care
11:24 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

The Doctor Shortage In Rural Missouri: Are Advanced Practice Nurses A Solution?

Missouri has about 5,000 nurse practitioners, but laws restrict how much medicine they can practice. Some say loosening the laws would help ease the shortage of doctors in rural Missouri.
Credit (Credit: Flickr/Free Grunge Texutres

Part two of a three-part series.

Lisa Schofield regards her business as an example of the future of health care in rural Missouri.

She owns the Theodosia Family Medical Clinic in south central Missouri, a region with a big demand for medical care and too few doctors to meet it. Theodosia is situated in Ozark County near the Arkansas border. The clinic serves about 900 patients, all of whom are treated by a nurse practitioner, or an N.P.

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Bridgeton Landfill
6:50 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Radioactive Waste Detected Closer To The Bridgeton Landfill Fire

This radiation warning sign is posted on the perimeter fence of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo.
Credit Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on 3/20/14 to add a statement from landfill owner Bridgeton Landfill, LLC, a subsidiary of Republic Services.

Preliminary tests by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have found radioactive waste closer to the underground fire at the Bridgeton Landfill than previously thought.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:56 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Hundreds Of Children Diagnosed With Lead Poisoning In St. Louis Each Year

An image from "MisLEAD," a documentary film on lead poisoning in America.
Courtesy Lead Safe America

The city of St. Louis has been working to reduce lead poisoning since the health department introduced a lead program in the 1940s. Since that time great strides have been made. But the danger of exposure to lead still exists in the city, and screenings reveal more than a thousand cases of elevated blood lead levels each year.

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Medical Care Shortage.
11:56 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Is There A Doctor — Or Nurse Practitioner — In The House? Not In Rural Missouri

Missouri's shortage of doctors in rural areas causes physical and financial hardship for thousands of people.
Credit (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Steve Morgan)

Part one of a three part series:

He woke up in the middle of the night late last year, one hand swollen and the rest of his body was shaking all over.

John Redford realized the symptoms were the consequences of several bites and scratches the day before from his struggle to put the family's 40-pound cat into a cage. He managed to calm himself enough that night and drive an old Mustang 50 miles to a hospital emergency room  in Jefferson City. There doctors began weeks of  treatment  and ultimately saved Redford from losing a finger.

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Fracking
11:56 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Health concerns grow as frac sand mines creep into Missouri [INFOGRAPHIC]

A frac sand mine in Wisconsin. There are more than 100 located within the state.

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 10:21 am

In Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., about 100 residents gathered for a town hall meeting in 2013 to discuss a new frac sand mine in their backyard. Officials from the county, state and mining company attended to answer questions residents might have.

Neighbors peppered the panel with questions: How will the mine’s sand dust be regulated? How will you prevent it from getting into our lungs? How will the traffic and explosions affect my health, my property and the ecosystem? Concerns about breathing in the microscopic sand particles, which could lead to silicosis in the lungs, abounded.

Jane Hardy, who lives about 1000 feet from the mine, said she wasn’t satisfied with the answers.

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