Health, Science, Environment

Space Science
5:12 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Waste In Space Is A Puzzle With Millions Of Pieces

There are something on the order of 12,000 to 15,000 pieces of space debris larger than the size of a softball orbiting the Earth.
Credit NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Space debris probably isn’t at the top of your list of day-to-day concerns.

The junk we’ve left floating around in space includes everything from spent rocket stages and old satellites, to nuts and bolts ― even tiny flecks of paint.

And it’s constantly colliding with satellites and anything else in what's known as “low Earth orbit,” including the International Space Station.

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Underground Railroad
9:38 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Archaeologists Dig For Clues To African-American History In Brooklyn, Ill.

Archaeologists from the Illinois State Archaeological Survey dig at the former 1851 house site of Priscilla Baltimore in Brooklyn, Illinois.
Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Brooklyn, Ill., is a small, predominantly African-American town, just across the Mississippi River from St. Louis.

What little revenue the town brings in comes mostly from strip clubs. But there’s more to Brooklyn than that.

Archaeologists from the Illinois State Archaeological Survey have been digging for evidence of Brooklyn’s pre-Civil-War past, trying to solve some of the mysteries about its origins.

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Scientific Research
8:09 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

CT Scans Reveal Surprises About Wash U And Saint Louis Art Museum's Egyptian Mummies

This CT scan of the mummy Henut-Wedjebu, an upper-class Egyptian woman who lived about 3,400 years ago, shows small shiny objects that appear to float around her head. These could be glass beads, embedded in a wig or shroud.
Washington University

Barnes-Jewish Hospital had some unusual “patients” on Sunday: three ancient Egyptian mummies.

Washington University radiologists put each mummy through a CT scanner, which uses X-rays to “see” through the mummies’ wrappings, and high-powered computing to generate detailed, 3-D images of the tissues, bones and organs underneath.

The mummies were already X-rayed in the late '60s, and two were CT-scanned in the '90s.

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Asthma Study
6:00 am
Sun October 12, 2014

NIH Seeks African Americans To Evaluate Asthma Medications

Dr. Leonard Bacharier, a Washington University pediatrician and asthma expert, consults with a patient at St. Louis Children's Hospital.
Credit Robert Boston|St. Louis Children's Hospital

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis needs African Americans with asthma to enroll in a study evaluating different treatments.

Previous research suggests that some medications may not work as well for blacks as for whites.

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Reproductive RIghts
10:39 am
Fri October 10, 2014

72-Hour Wait For Abortions Will Reduce Access, Providers Say

Credit Adrian Clark / Flickr

For the past eight years, Missouri has had a 24-hour wait rule for abortions: Women seeking to end a pregnancy must visit a clinic for an initial health consultation before waiting 24 hours to have the procedure.

On Friday, a new state law goes into effect that triples the wait time. The law includes no exemptions for rape or incest, which is one reason Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, vetoed it. But the state legislature last month overrode his veto.

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St. Louis on the Air
1:17 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Professor: Childhood Obesity Rates High, But No Longer Climbing

Northwestern University communications and psychology professor Ellen Wartella
Credit Courtesy Webster University

The Institute of Medicine first rang the alarm bells about childhood obesity in 2004, when a study found that obesity rates had more than doubled among children in the previous 30 years. At that time, they identified that about one-third of American children were either obese or overweight, and two-thirds of adults were obese or overweight. The question became why.

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St. Louis on the Air
1:14 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

How Accurate Is Memory? How Accurate Is Eyewitness Testimony?

Psychology professor Steven Smith
Credit Courtesy of Steven Smith

As people age, they become more aware of memory lapses.

“Memory loss is fairly universal, and as we start experiencing more memory loss, we become a lot more aware of it,” said Steven Smith, a Texas A&M University psychologist who is on sabbatical and is spending the semester at Washington University. “We become very defensive about it. We become very anxious about it. And that makes memory worse.”

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Abortion in Missouri
10:05 pm
Mon October 6, 2014

Planned Parenthood Will Not Immediately Challenge 72-Hour Wait

Paula Gianino is president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri.
Credit Provided

   A new Missouri state law requiring women to wait 72 hours to have an abortion after their initial consultation is set to take effect Friday, and the state’s only abortion provider says it will not immediately appeal the measure in court.

President and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri, Paula Gianino, said attorneys for their national organization did not think an appeal would be successful in state or federal court.

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St. Louis on the Air
11:20 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Environmental Activist To Address Bridgeton Landfill Concerns

Lois Gibbs holds her daughter Missy stands outside her Love Canal home in Niagara Falls, N.Y., in 1978.
Credit Courtesy of Lois Gibbs

Environmental activist Lois Gibbs will be in St. Louis this weekend for a “teach-in” to address problems at the adjoining Bridgeton and West Lake landfills, located in Bridgeton a few miles from Lambert Airport.

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Reproductive Health
4:00 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Study: Giving Teens Free Birth Control Means Fewer Unplanned Pregnancies And Abortions

IUDs and implants are 20 times more effective at preventing pregnancy than short-term birth control options like the pill, patch, or vaginal ring (pictured).
Credit Via Wikimedia Commons/Victor byckttor

Giving teenagers access to free, long-term contraception can dramatically reduce rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion. That's according to new research out of Washington University in St. Louis.

The study is part of a larger effort called the Contraceptive CHOICE Project, whose goal is to promote long-acting forms of birth control like intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants in order to reduce unplanned pregnancies in the St. Louis region.

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