health

Affordable Care Act
8:45 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

New Report: St. Louis Area Hospitals Improved With Financial Incentives

Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis
Credit courtesy of Barnes Jewish Hospital

A health industry report published Thursday suggests federal programs that tie hospital quality scores to Medicare reimbursements are giving St. Louis hospitals a reason to improve.

Seventeen St. Louis area hospitals received bonus payments this year from Medicare thanks to programs in the Affordable Care Act that reward hospitals for providing a high quality of care. At the same  time, 25 were penalized for low scores, high readmission rates or failing to improve between 2011 and 2012.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
5:03 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

How Can St. Louis Improve Biking, Walking Access?

Credit Flickr/Jeremy Noble

With the clear, warm weather of summer, more St. Louisans of all ages are taking to the streets and the sidewalks on foot and by bike. The city has plans in the works to make walking, biking and running easier, from Complete Streets to separated bike lanes.

“I think overall we have great facilities in St. Louis and there has been a lot of improvement in the five years that I’ve lived here,” said Aaron Hipp, assistant professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. His research evaluates how built communities affect the activity and health of those who use them.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
4:22 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Panera's Cutting Artificial Sweeteners — Should You?

Panera Bread Co. announced in June that it will eliminate artificial sweeteners, coloring and preservatives from all of its foods by 2016.
Credit Courtesy: Panera Bread Co.

Artificial sweeteners have been controversial for decades. Several studies have attacked sweeteners, especially aspartame used in diet sodas.

In June, St. Louis-based Panera Bread Co. announced it will eliminate artificial sweeteners, coloring and preservatives from its foods by 2016. Panera nutrition manager Katie Bengston said “taste is the driving factor.”

Bengston said Panera is evaluating everything, including the sodas it sells.

Read more
St. Louis On The Air
5:14 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Wash U Clinic Seeks Treatments For An Often Undiagnosed Syndrome That Wreaks Havoc On Women

Credit (Credit: Flickr/Free Grunge Texutres

Randa Herman of Marion, Ill., always knew something was wrong. Her menstrual period came late and wasn’t regular. She had extra hair growth where there wasn’t supposed to be any, and acne after adolescence.

Eventually, Herman discovered her troubles were caused by Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and found her way to Dr. Valerie Ratts' office at Washington University’s School of Medicine.

Read more
For the Sake of All
5:00 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Report: Racial Health Disparities Affect Everyone In St. Louis, Not Just African Americans

For the Sake of All was a multidisciplinary study on the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis City and County.
Credit For the Sake of All

If your skin isn’t black, why should you care about the health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region?

That’s just one of the questions Washington University public health researcher Jason Purnell and his team set out to answer in a project called For the Sake of All.

Purnell, along with colleagues from Washington University and St. Louis University, assessed racial health disparities in the region and their larger impact over the course of 14 months.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
4:12 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Cardiologist Speaks On Snow, Sugar And Other Dangers To The Heart

(via Wikimedia Commons)

With this winter’s prolific snowfalls, slippery streets and biting cold aren’t the only dangers to be concerned about. According to cardiologist Andrew Kates, people should also think twice about shoveling snow if they aren’t accustomed to exercise. That’s because shoveling snow can cause heart attacks.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
5:31 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

The Past Decade Shows Progress In The Battle Against Chronic Diseases, St. Louis Researchers Say

Credit hrsa.gov

Fifth Brief: For the Sake of All

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
5:28 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Report: Racial Divide Leads To Health Disparity In St. Louis

Credit For the Sake of All

Fourth Brief: For the Sake of All

In the fourth policy brief from For the Sake of All, a collaborative, inter-disciplinary study on the health of African Americans in St. Louis and St. Louis County, researchers focused on the role segregation plays on health in the area. It is titled "Segregation: Divided Cities Lead to Differences in Health."

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
4:31 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

March Of Dimes Turns Research Focus To Preventing Premature Birth

(via Flickr/Joshua Smith)

When Reggie Rideout's daughter Maya was born seven years ago, she weighed just 1 lb. 15 oz.

"I was aiming for a St. Patrick's baby and ended up with a Christmas baby," said Rideout. Her daughter was born at 27 weeks. “I was just so unprepared. And I’m a planner....All of a sudden, not only are you not pregnant anymore, but your baby is very sick.”

Despite Maya's tough start, she is doing well now. "She's a first-grader. She's healthy and intelligent. You would never look at her and know she was born actually a little over three months early," said Rideout.

Read more
Health, Science, Environment
4:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

St. Louis Researchers Connect African-American Health Problems To Poverty, Lack Of Education

Credit National Cancer Institute | Wikimedia Commons

First Brief: For the Sake of All

A disproportionate number of African Americans in St. Louis live in poverty and lack a high school education. African-American St. Louisans also have a higher death rate than white St. Louisans. According to a multi-disciplinary study currently under way in St. Louis, there is a connection between the two trends.

Read more

Pages