Heart Attack | St. Louis Public Radio

Heart Attack

The study examined over 580,000 patient records collected over a 20-year period and found women were more likely to survive a heart attack when treated by a female doctor than a male doctor.
Maria Fabrizio | NPR

Doctors have long known that women in the U.S. have a higher risk of dying from heart attacks than men.

The reasons driving this gender gap in survival, however, have perplexed researchers. A study led in part by Washington University suggests the gender of the attending doctor may play a role. Women were more likely to survive a heart attack when treated by a female doctor than a male doctor.

Bram Sable-Smith | Side Effects Public Media

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services has designated nine hospitals in St. Louis County as priority heart attack centers to ensure that the most at-risk patients receive help as fast as possible.

Saint Louis University Hospital had the highest rates of heart failure patients with complications in the St. Louis region.
Sarah Fentem | St. Louis Public Radio

Patients with heart failure who are discharged from the hospital are more likely to have other health problems and complications if they live in Missouri's largest cities, according to a study by the health research company Dexur.

Complications are usually seen as a way to gauge a population's overall well-being. Experts say the heart failure data indicates urban populations have more untreated health problems than other areas of the state.

University of Illinois and Washington University

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new device that may one day help prevent heart attacks.

Unlike existing pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that are one-size-fits-all, the new device is a thin, elastic membrane designed to stretch over the heart like a custom-made glove.

Sudden Cardiac Death: Could You Be Next?

Jun 18, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 18, 2008 -  The sudden passing of NBC newsman Tim Russert came as a shock. A shock because, at age 58, the renowned host of NBC's "Meet the Press" died so young. But it seems even more alarming because he had passed a stress test recently and had logged time on a treadmill on the day of his death.