Heart Disease | St. Louis Public Radio

Heart Disease

Dr. Andrew Kates of the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital discusses recent heart health research.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

February is Heart Health Month. As such, we invited Dr. Andrew Kates, professor of medicine and cardiologist with the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to join St. Louis on the Air to discuss new developments in heart health research and answer questions about the heart.

Heart disease is the largest killer of American men and women, outpacing all types of cancer, COPD and lung disease as a cause of death in the United States. More women die of heart disease than men do each year.

Dr. Andrew Kates of the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to join “St. Louis on the Air” to discuss new developments in heart health research and answer questions about the heart.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

February is Heart Health Month. As such, we invited Dr. Andrew Kates of the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to join “St. Louis on the Air” to discuss new developments in heart health research and answer questions about the heart.

Here are five questions we asked and five things we learned:

1. Heart disease kills more women every year than every other kind of cancer combined. Why?

Cardiologist Andrew Kates talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh about heart health on Feb. 4, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Have you heard the one about Twitter predicting heart disease risk?

University of Illinois and Washington University

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new device that may one day help prevent heart attacks.

Unlike existing pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that are one-size-fits-all, the new device is a thin, elastic membrane designed to stretch over the heart like a custom-made glove.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

With this winter’s prolific snowfalls, slippery streets and biting cold aren’t the only dangers to be concerned about. According to cardiologist Andrew Kates, people should also think twice about shoveling snow if they aren’t accustomed to exercise. That’s because shoveling snow can cause heart attacks.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

The FDA's proposed ban on trans fats and new heart disease prevention guidelines jointly released by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have stirred up debate over best practices to improve heart health.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the world.

It is the cause for roughly every one in four deaths, and because of this, doctors and researchers are struggling to discover early-warning symptoms and preventions.

One of the biggest problems for many suffering from heart disease is that they are not aware they have it. There are several examinations, the most common being stress tests, that can help determine how at risk a patient is for encountering a heart attack, but no such test is foolproof in diagnosing the heart condition and alerting patients of its severity.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 14, 2008 - When Dr. Elbert P. Trulock started practicing 25 years ago, a diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension was basically a death sentence.

Physicians had little knowledge about the disease, which causes runaway high-blood pressure in arteries of the lungs, labored breathing, lung damage and reduced blood-pumping ability of the heart.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 12, 2008 - Excess Drinking Linked to Metabolic Syndrome

In the Doctor's Lounge - Diabetes, exercise, diet

Aug 5, 2008

This article was originally published in the St. Louis Beacon: August 5, 2008 - Diabetes-diet Link Examined in Trio of Studies

We know that fruits and vegetables are good for us. One of a trio of studies on dietary links to diabetes published in the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine gives us yet another example of just how much. "Our findings highlight a potentially important public health message on the benefits of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables for the prevention of diabetes," wrote the authors.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 29, 2008 - Anesthetic Accidents More Common in Afternoon 

A shortage of anesthesiologists is leading to longer working hours and more fatigue among the docs, according to an article in the July issue of the AORN Journal. And further, "Anesthetic adverse events have been found to occur more frequently in surgical procedures performed after 4 p.m."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 16, 2008 - Psoriasis Patients Often Under-treated

As many as 7.5 million Americans have psoriasis, and a significant portion of those afflicted may not be getting adequate treatment. "There remains a gap in treatment for about 40 percent of patients with severe disease," the authors of a recent study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology write.

a healthy coronary artery.  300 pixels. 2008
Copyright Textwriter

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 24, 2008 - On June 13, Tim Russert died of a massive heart attack. Moderator of NBCs influential "Meet the Press," he had seemed in perfect health and had no apparent risk factors, a healthy individual who was a nonsmoker, exercised regularly, ate a healthy diet -- and drops dead of a heart attack.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 12, 2008 -  Many patients suffering from heart failure are getting implantable cardiac devices that are unlikely to increase their chances for survival, says Dr. Paul Hauptman, cardiologist and professor of internal medicine at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. He and his colleagues published their findings in a new study that is currently online and slated to be released in an upcoming issue of the American Heart Journal.