Hearts | St. Louis Public Radio

Hearts

Dr. Andrew Kates of the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital discusses recent heart health research.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

February is Heart Health Month. As such, we invited Dr. Andrew Kates, professor of medicine and cardiologist with the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to join St. Louis on the Air to discuss new developments in heart health research and answer questions about the heart.

Heart disease is the largest killer of American men and women, outpacing all types of cancer, COPD and lung disease as a cause of death in the United States. More women die of heart disease than men do each year.

Dr. Andrew Kates of the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to join “St. Louis on the Air” to discuss new developments in heart health research and answer questions about the heart.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

February is Heart Health Month. As such, we invited Dr. Andrew Kates of the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to join “St. Louis on the Air” to discuss new developments in heart health research and answer questions about the heart.

Here are five questions we asked and five things we learned:

1. Heart disease kills more women every year than every other kind of cancer combined. Why?

A model of the heart of a patient with complex congenital heart disease, created at St. Louis University.
Dr. Wilson King

The development of 3-D printers, which use computer designs to create solid objects, are revolutionizing the way engineers make prototypes, models and even some consumer goods. The practical applications for the health-care industry are huge — and they’re starting to happen in St. Louis.

Cardiologist Andrew Kates talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh about heart health on Feb. 4, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Have you heard the one about Twitter predicting heart disease risk?

University of Illinois and Washington University

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new device that may one day help prevent heart attacks.

Unlike existing pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that are one-size-fits-all, the new device is a thin, elastic membrane designed to stretch over the heart like a custom-made glove.

For patients with heart failure, but normal heart rhythm, aspirin may be just as good as a heavy duty blood-thinner.

That’s the finding of a new study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Washington University chief of cardiology Douglas Mann was on the study’s steering committee.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

The FDA has approved the first heart valve replacement procedure that does not involve open heart surgery.

Instead of opening the patient's chest, the doctor inserts the new heart valve by threading a catheter through a vein in the patient's leg. Here's a video of how that works :