Historic Preservation

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

There’s now another hole in the urban fabric of downtown St. Louis. Piles of rubble are all that remains at the corner of 11th and Spruce streets, where the Cupples 7 building once stood.

The 113-year-old brick warehouse was part of the Cupples Station Historic District, a massive complex of 20 buildings that served as the logistics hub for the city in the early 20th century. Today, just eight remain.   

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A nearly two-year battle over the fate of a historic warehouse in downtown St. Louis is over.

Crews from Spirtas Wrecking Company will begin to demolish the nine-story Cupples 7 building at 10th and Spruce streets next week. The work will take about three months.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri senators have given up their attempt to pass an overhaul of some of the state's tax credit programs for businesses and developers.

Supporters of the bill set it aside Friday after Republican Sen. Brad Lager, of Savannah, spoke against it for an hour in a filibuster that could have otherwise continued until the session's mandatory end at 6 p.m.

The legislation would have created tax incentives for international air cargo exports, computer data centers and investors in startup technology companies.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The building in Midtown which has become commonly known as the "Flying Saucer" will receive an award for its much-publicized transformation.

The Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation will recognize the effort at their Preservation Honor Awards ceremony on Feb. 27.

A Starbucks moved into the former gas station and Del Taco restaurant in Sep. 2012 and a Chipotle restaurant is expected to inhabit the other side of the building in the coming weeks. 

via Flickr/alancleaver_2000

Members of a panel created to review Missouri’s tax credits are leaning towards recommending that the cap on Historic Preservation tax credits be cut nearly in half.

The incentives program is popular with developers, but Democratic Governor Jay Nixon and a group of Republican State Senators say it’s draining off revenues from the state budget.

Tom Reeves co-chairs the subcommittee looking into Historic Preservation tax credits. He says he favors much of the recommendation from two years ago to reduce the annual cap from $140 million a year to $75 million a year.

(Landmarks Association of St. Louis/Andrew Weil)

Some familiar structures have returned to the the Landmarks Association of St. Louis's list of most endangered buildings in the region.

It's the 20th year the Association has published the list, which is designed to highlight 11 iconic or important buildings in danger of disappearing due to neglect or proposed demolition.

(ABS Consulting)

The owners of a crumbling warehouse building in downtown St. Louis are out of legal options at the state level.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Speaker of the Missouri House has thrown cold water on a scaled-back tax credit reform measure passed Wednesday by the Senate.

The Missouri Senate has passed a tax credit measure after hammering out an agreement between GOP leaders and fiscal conservatives who’ve been trying to reign in tax breaks for years.

The agreement would cap historic preservation tax credits at $75 million per year, give a one-year extension to food pantry and other charitable tax breaks, and create incentives to draw amateur sporting events to Missouri.  State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale) urged the chamber to pass it before time runs out on the regular session.

(ABS Consulting)

The city's Preservation Board voted nearly unanimously Monday night to deny a demolition permit to the owner of a crumbling warehouse in the Cupples Station historic district near Busch Stadium.