Historic Preservation

(Landmarks Association of St. Louis/Andrew Weil)

Some familiar structures have returned to the the Landmarks Association of St. Louis's list of most endangered buildings in the region.

It's the 20th year the Association has published the list, which is designed to highlight 11 iconic or important buildings in danger of disappearing due to neglect or proposed demolition.

(ABS Consulting)

The owners of a crumbling warehouse building in downtown St. Louis are out of legal options at the state level.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Speaker of the Missouri House has thrown cold water on a scaled-back tax credit reform measure passed Wednesday by the Senate.

The Missouri Senate has passed a tax credit measure after hammering out an agreement between GOP leaders and fiscal conservatives who’ve been trying to reign in tax breaks for years.

The agreement would cap historic preservation tax credits at $75 million per year, give a one-year extension to food pantry and other charitable tax breaks, and create incentives to draw amateur sporting events to Missouri.  State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale) urged the chamber to pass it before time runs out on the regular session.

(ABS Consulting)

The city's Preservation Board voted nearly unanimously Monday night to deny a demolition permit to the owner of a crumbling warehouse in the Cupples Station historic district near Busch Stadium.

(screenshot via Google Maps)

Saying he has no choice, the owner of a crumbling building in the Cupples Station warehouse complex has applied for a permit to demolish the building.

Developer Kevin McGowan, who owns the building at 1014 Spruce St. known as Cupples 7, filed his application on Nov. 9th.  Streets around the building have been blocked off since late September due to safety concerns.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri House has done an about-face and now wants a joint committee to negotiate a final version of a wide-ranging tax credit bill that has divided the House and Senate throughout the ongoing special session.

House Speaker Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) had suggested weeks ago that a conference committee wasn’t necessary and that any differences on tax credits could be worked out during floor debates.  Senate President Pro-tem Rob Mayer (R, Dexter), meanwhile, had pushed for going to conference because that’s the normal route for reaching compromise on bills.  Tilley says he’s decided to take Mayer at his word.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Updated 5:14 p.m.

The Missouri House has passed its version of a wide-ranging tax credit bill.

It does not place expiration dates, or sunsets, on historic preservation and low income housing tax credits, as demanded by the Senate.  Instead, House GOP leaders hope to mollify the Senate with a new proposal:  All tax credit programs would come up for review every four years and be subject to a renewal vote by the General Assembly.  The measure is sponsored by House Budget Chairman Ryan Silvey (R, Kansas City).

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The economic development deal struck by lawmakers will cut one of Missouri’s most popular tax credits nearly in half.

The deal between House and Senate leaders would cut the amount of Historic Preservation tax credits issued each year from $140 million down to $80 million.

Ruth Keenoy with the non-profit Landmark Associates of St. Louis, Inc., says the smaller cap would be detrimental to Missouri’s economy.  She wants the incentives to be left as-is.

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