history

St. Louis on the Air
4:28 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

Remembering The Battleship USS Missouri

The USS Missouri
From "The Second Decommissioning," a history provided by Tim Raines.

On January 29, 1944, the USS Missouri (BB-63) launched into the sea for the first time, the last battleship of her kind ever built. Harry S. Truman was a senator at the time, and his daughter Margaret christened the ship.

To mark the 70th anniversary of the Missouri, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh spoke with Michael Carr, president and COO of the USS Missouri Memorial Association and two St. Louis area residents who served aboard the ship. He also spoke with former U.S. Senator and First Lady of Missouri Jean Carnahan about the historic ship's silver.

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Cityscape
4:35 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Book 'Fading Ads Of St. Louis' Showcases Unique Slice Of History

Star Saloon & Cafe / Old Pattison Whiskies, McRee Town, near Southside, 2012.
(Courtesy History Press)

William Stage first noticed faded ads painted on brick walls back in the 1970s, when he pounded the St. Louis pavement as a public health officer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Once you do begin to notice them, it’s contagious, you find more and more,” Stage said.

He began carrying around a camera to document the ads, and in 1989 published a book on the topic, “Ghost Signs: Brick Wall Signs in America.”

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St. Louis on the Air
9:58 am
Tue November 19, 2013

The Lost Art Of Letter Writing, Or, How You Texted Your Mom In 1863

The first page of a letter written by Alfred S. Hartwell in 1864.
Credit (Missouri History Museum)

In the age of emails, texts and tweets, we take a look back to a time when the handwritten letter was the primary way people communicated across long distances.

In his book To the Letter: A Celebration of the Lost Art of Letter Writing, author Simon Garfield examines the role of letters throughout history – a role that now must adapt to current technology.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:16 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

How America's 'Old Man River' Shaped History

A screenshot of the Mississippi River watershed from the stream mapping tool created by the Department of the Interior.
www.nationalatlas.gov/streamer

From transporting Native Americans to the founding of the United States and beyond, the Mississippi River is an integral part of American history.

In his new book, Old Man River: The Mississippi River in North American History, author Paul Schneider weaves together all of these stories and more to tell the greater story of a continent formed and transformed by a river which both divides and unites.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

1927 As Told By Author Bill Bryson: The Year of Babe Ruth, Charles Lindbergh And More

Bill Bryson
(Courtesy Bath & North East Somerset Council, UK)

Bestselling author Bill Bryson has covered a range of topics over the years. He wrote about science in  A Short History of Just About Everything. He detailed his travel through the Appalachian Trail in A Walk in the Woods. And he outlined the idiosyncrasies of the English language in Made in America.

In his latest offering, One Summer: America, 1927, Bryson maintains his signature humorous tone as he offers historical tidbits covering a four-month time span in American history.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:03 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Art Connects German And St. Louis History

Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, German; The Reichstag?, 2013
Images courtesy Stih & Schnock © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

When Berlin-based conceptual artists Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock first visited St. Louis in 2002, they were surprised by how familiar the city felt to them.

"We were baffled by how German it is. How normal everything sounds and looks," said Stih. "It wasn’t New York, it wasn’t Chicago, for sure not LA, It was something like a nice, quiet, city with extraordinary town planning."

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St. Louis on the Air
4:59 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

A Discussion With PBS Journalist Ray Suarez On The History Of Latinos In America

Ray Suarez
(Courtesy PBS)

According to the U.S. Census, the United States will become a majority-minority by the year 2043, with Latinos representing the largest portion of the population.

While this shift in demographics represents a major sea-change for the country, in a way it is also nothing more than a continuation of a long story: the 500 year history of Latino Americans.

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Features
4:00 am
Wed March 20, 2013

16th Street Baptist Church Bombing Still Resonates With Survivor Nearly 50 Years Later

Congress of Racial Equality and members of the All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, D.C. march in memory of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing victims. The banner, which says “No more Birminghams”, shows a picture of the aftermath of th

On Sunday, September 15, 1963, a 14-year old Carolyn McKinstry witnessed an event that would change her life forever – the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The incident killed Carolyn's four friends - and would become an recurring topic of conversation and lasting mark on America's history to this day.

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Great Missouri Treasure Hunt
10:52 am
Wed June 29, 2011

Mo. holds contest focused on historic records

An 1895 railroad map of Missouri.
(via Flickr/BrianSwan)

A new contest is designed to encourage Missouri residents to scour historic records held by the state's public institutions.

The Great Missouri Treasure Hunt is sponsored by the Missouri State Archives to promote awareness of historic records available on the Internet.

Participants will enter stories they unearthed from online records or documents. Entries will be broken down into family history, Civil War history and Missouri history.

from St. Louis on the Air
4:32 pm
Mon April 4, 2011

New documentary sheds light on the story of Pruitt-Igoe

Partially demolished Pruitt-Igoe (Daniel Magidson)

The Pruitt-Igoe public housing project in St. Louis was once considered the template for post-war public housing, a national model.  For awhile it was—until it wasn’t.  The high rise complex was constructed in 1954.  Two decades later, and by then notorious, Pruitt-Igoe was a pile of rubble, imploded and bulldozed into history. What went wrong and why?  That’s the subject of a new documentary film called The Pruitt-Igoe Myth: an Urban History.   Directed by Chad Freidrichs, the film will have its St. Louis premiere this Saturday at the Missouri History Museum.

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