history

St. Louis on the Air
4:59 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

A Discussion With PBS Journalist Ray Suarez On The History Of Latinos In America

Ray Suarez
(Courtesy PBS)

According to the U.S. Census, the United States will become a majority-minority by the year 2043, with Latinos representing the largest portion of the population.

While this shift in demographics represents a major sea-change for the country, in a way it is also nothing more than a continuation of a long story: the 500 year history of Latino Americans.

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Features
4:00 am
Wed March 20, 2013

16th Street Baptist Church Bombing Still Resonates With Survivor Nearly 50 Years Later

Congress of Racial Equality and members of the All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, D.C. march in memory of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing victims. The banner, which says “No more Birminghams”, shows a picture of the aftermath of th

On Sunday, September 15, 1963, a 14-year old Carolyn McKinstry witnessed an event that would change her life forever – the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The incident killed Carolyn's four friends - and would become an recurring topic of conversation and lasting mark on America's history to this day.

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Great Missouri Treasure Hunt
10:52 am
Wed June 29, 2011

Mo. holds contest focused on historic records

An 1895 railroad map of Missouri.
(via Flickr/BrianSwan)

A new contest is designed to encourage Missouri residents to scour historic records held by the state's public institutions.

The Great Missouri Treasure Hunt is sponsored by the Missouri State Archives to promote awareness of historic records available on the Internet.

Participants will enter stories they unearthed from online records or documents. Entries will be broken down into family history, Civil War history and Missouri history.

from St. Louis on the Air
4:32 pm
Mon April 4, 2011

New documentary sheds light on the story of Pruitt-Igoe

Partially demolished Pruitt-Igoe (Daniel Magidson)

The Pruitt-Igoe public housing project in St. Louis was once considered the template for post-war public housing, a national model.  For awhile it was—until it wasn’t.  The high rise complex was constructed in 1954.  Two decades later, and by then notorious, Pruitt-Igoe was a pile of rubble, imploded and bulldozed into history. What went wrong and why?  That’s the subject of a new documentary film called The Pruitt-Igoe Myth: an Urban History.   Directed by Chad Freidrichs, the film will have its St. Louis premiere this Saturday at the Missouri History Museum.

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Mo. Supreme Court Archives
11:09 am
Mon March 7, 2011

Mo. Supreme Court cases from 1800s to go on Web

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

History buff? Legal enthusiast? Generally curious about Missouri's past? Get excited.

The Missouri State Archives will be posting thousands of old state Supreme Court cases online for the public to view beginning late next year.

The Secretary of State's office says the State Archives has received a grant of more than $148,000 from the federal government for the project.

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from St. Louis on the Air
3:56 pm
Wed December 15, 2010

History, comedy, and baseball meet in Bobby Norfolk's "Shadowball"

Bobby Norfolk at St. Louis Public Radio
photo by Aaron Doerr

Bobby Norfolk was driving somewhere in 2009 when NPR's Fresh Air stopped him in his tracks.  He remembers the interview with author Larry Tye as "the most compelling hour of listening" he's ever experienced. Tye's biography of Negro League pitcher Satchel Paige started Norfolk on a journey that's culminated in his latest one man show,  Shadowball: The Negro Baseball Leagues.

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