homeless

(Tim Lloyd for St. Louis Public Radio)

The Department of Veterans Affairs is almost halfway through its national push to end homelessness by 2015.

And even though the agency says it’s making progress, there are still more than 67,000 homeless veterans in America.

That has the VA reaching out more and more to community partners as key allies in its battle to end veterans homelessness.

In this first installment of a two-part series on veterans' homelessness, Tim Lloyd reports on how the national initiative is strengthening local partnerships in St. Louis.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

The city of St. Louis says the 30 remaining residents of three homeless encampments located just north of downtown will have until the end of May to leave the location, or face possible arrest.

"The encampments have attracted a great deal of attention to the problems of homeless persons," said Bill Siedhoff, the city's human services director. "But they are not safe places for people to live, and they are certainly not a long-term answer to the problem."

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The 45 people that make their home in three camps north of downtown are invisible to most St. Louisans.

They lived nestled between the floodwall and the train tracks at the foot of the new Mississippi River Bridge with little city interference until January. That’s when a propane heater sparked a fire that torched three tents. Even more attention followed after one resident fatally stabbed another in May, and the city made the decision to clear the location. It's an already difficult task - made even harder by the stubbornly sluggish economy.

St. Louis City Hall
Richie Diesterheft | Flickr

The City of St. Louis has received $600,000 to provide homeless veterans with services.

The money will be split between the St. Patrick Center, which offers housing services, and Employment Connection which provides job training skills.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay says that as approximately 12 percent of the city’s homeless are veterans.

(Google Maps)

St. Louis city officials say they will step up their efforts to move residents from a series of tent encampments along the Mississippi River north of downtown into permanent housing.

The city of St. Louis today marked the halfway point in its ten-year effort to end chronic homelessness.

A five-year report released today shows a 20 percent drop in the city's chronically homeless since 2005.

Chronic homelessness is defined as those homeless for a year or more or four times over a three-year period.

The report also states that the overall homeless population also decreased, from about 1,500 in 2005 to about 1,300 last year.

The City of St. Louis has issued new rules for residents of the area's unofficial homeless encampments.

Residents will not be allowed to drink or use drugs, or engage in criminal activity. And they will also have to cooperate with police, fire and the city health department.

St. Louis Department of Human Services director Bill Siedhoff says he doesn't expect enforcement to be a problem:

(Places for People)

The non-profit organization Places for People broke ground today on a 23 unit apartment building that will provide housing for the chronically homeless in St. Louis. Organizers say it's Missouri's first affordable development funded by the state's housing commission.

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