Impeachment | St. Louis Public Radio

Impeachment

Catherine Hanaway looks on as Eric Greitens speaks at St. Louis Public Radio's GOP gubernatorial candidate debate.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the surface, it may seem odd that Catherine Hanaway decided to join Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ flourishing legal team.

The former House speaker and U.S. attorney ran against Greitens during a contentious GOP Republican primary, often trading sharp barbs against the eventual victor’s credentials and fundraising. Ultimately, Hanaway was an enthusiastic surrogate for Greitens after he won the primary — and several people from her campaign joined his administration.

Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

Gov. Eric Greitens is in danger of becoming the first Missouri governor ever to be impeached.

That’s because members of the House and Senate have gathered enough signatures to call a special session that would include considering impeaching the GOP governor, who is facing two felony charges and a full collapse of his political support.

Scores of reporters look on as House Speaker Todd Richardson addresses the media on April 11, 2018. The release of House report on Gov. Eric Greitens' conduct is opening the door to impeachment proceedings.
Tim Bommel I House Communications

State Rep. Kathie Conway was one of the first Republican lawmakers to suggest that Gov. Eric Greitens resign.

It was a move that set her apart from most of her Republican and Democratic colleagues, many of whom wanted to wait for more information to come out about a 2015 extramarital affair.

Now, high-ranking members of both parties have joined Conway in calling for Greitens to leave after a startling House committee report. But Conway isn’t saying ‘I told you so.’ Instead, she’s lamenting how his refusal to step down may affect the business of state government.

File Photo |Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens for one count of felony invasion of privacy raises lots of questions. St. Louis Public Radio asked our social media followers on Twitter and Facebook to send their questions to us.

Yolanda Fountain Henderson has been ousted as Jenning's mayor.
Wiley Price | St. Louis American

Updated May 28 wtih Henderson's reaction: Former mayor of Jennings, Yolonda Fountain-Henderson said a “political witch hunt” has been issued against her by city officials during a Friday morning press conference outside the city hall. Just a few days earlier, on Tuesday night, Jennings city council unanimously voted to impeach Henderson. The impeachment included two votes from Jennings newest elected city council members, who have been serving for less than two months. Last year, Henderson made history by being elected as the city’s first black woman mayor.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has wrapped up hearings into three articles of impeachment against Gov. Jay Nixon but has yet to vote on them.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Stanley Cox, R-Sedalia, says he'll seek input from the rest of the committee before deciding whether to hold a vote on the three impeachment articles.

Editor's Weekly: Impeaching Nixon, Again

Apr 24, 2014
Wikipedia

Nixon impeachment hearings began this week.

Not THAT Nixon. Not President Richard Milhous, who resigned 40 years ago this August rather than face House votes on three articles of impeachment. This time, the Nixon under discussion is Gov. Jeremiah Wilson “Jay,” who remains very much in power as a Missouri House committee begins consideration of three articles of impeachment against him.

Beyond the jolt of déjà vu you might get from the headline, there’s little to connect the political drama of 1973-74 and the political theater playing out now.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Hearings began Wednesday on three articles of impeachment against Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 21, 2008 - Even if Gov. Rod Blagojevich had been comatose instead of incriminatingly verbose, it would have made no difference: Illinois lacks a blueprint for urgently removing an incapacitated governor unable or unwilling to step aside.

The state Constitution approved by voters nearly four decades ago directed the legislature to establish one. It also instructed the Supreme Court to do so if the General Assembly balked. But the lawmakers and the justices have failed us even after being reminded of their obligation five years ago.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - Dec. 18, 2008 - The legal tangle faced by the Illinois impeachment committee may have a legal solution. But a political solution may be the best way to solve the Blagojevich problem.

That's the assessment of both a lawyer and a political scientist.