Income Tax | St. Louis Public Radio

Income Tax

Statewide population data shows that females in Missouri ages 16 and older who work full-time jobs all year won’t earn as much as men until 2066.
Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House and Senate leaders are balking at Gov. Eric Greitens’ plan to establish a line of credit to ensure that all state income tax refunds are paid on time.

The $250 million credit line is part of the governor’s proposed state budget for Fiscal Year 2019, which begins July 1. But President Pro-tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, gave a flat-out “no” to that idea while talking with the media Thursday.

Tax expert Lance Weiss talks  about actions people can take before the end of the year to minimize their tax liability for 2017.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

As we reach the end of the year, we talk to our go-to tax expert for tips. On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to expert Lance Weiss, a CPA and partner with SFW Partners, LLC, about actions people can take before the end of the year to minimize their tax liability for 2017.

Weiss also addressed the new tax reform law that will affect next year’s tax liability.

Some suggestions for this year:

U.S. Rep Ann Wagner, a Republican from Ballwin, raised $804,000 from Jan. 1 to March 31.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner is dismissing any talk about fellow Republicans firing special prosecutor Bob Mueller, who has charged three former campaign aides to President Donald Trump.

“We’re going to let special prosecutor Mueller and the Justice Department do their work,” said Wagner, R-Ballwin, in an interview. “I’ve got work to do here in the 2nd district and in Congress. Everybody should do their job.”

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., says she learned a lot from her unsuccessful run for governor in 2004.
Sen. McCaskill's Flickr page

Hundreds of thousands of senior citizens in Missouri, Illinois and across the U.S., have fallen victim to a high-tech phone scam during this tax season, prompting the Senate Special Committee on Aging to conduct a tax-day hearing on the matter.

Tax season is identity-theft season

Apr 12, 2015
StockMonkeys.com | Flickr

Bryan Buck, a federal bank examiner from St. Louis, got a letter last week from Anthem Insurance saying that “cyber attackers” had executed a “sophisticated attack” on its data systems and that his personal information may have been compromised.

He wasn't surprised. He already knew someone else had used his Social Security number to file for a tax refund.

CPA Answers Your End-Of-The-Year Tax Questions

Dec 16, 2014
dleafy | sxc.hu

The most wonderful time of the year means the least favorite time of the year is approaching: Tax time.

There are some things taxpayers can do now to help alleviate individual tax burdens in April, certified public account Lance Weiss of SFW Partners LLC told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

(via Flickr/401K)

Thousands of Missourians are still waiting for state income tax refunds, nearly two months after the April 15 filing deadline.

As of today, Michelle Gleb, director of communications for the Missouri Department of Revenue, said 260,826 tax refunds are pending; the refunds total almost $113 million. Gleba says the department is working to get the refunds out as quickly as possible and as cash flow allows. They expect all refunds to be made by the end of June.

When the Missouri General Assembly passed its tax cut bill, SB509, the Missouri School Boards Association released a chart showing how much money each of the state's school districts stood to lose if the bill became law. The chart compares the difference between Nixon's recommended level of funding for each district and the lower appropriation request that would result as a result of the tax cuts — a total of $223 million statewide.

Commentary: Oh, That Hilarious Tax Code

Apr 14, 2014

April 15 is a special day -- especially for those of us who toil professionally in the tax vineyards. After 40 years, I am still amazed at the breadth and scope of our enormous body of tax law. I also never fail to be amazed and amused by all of the odd, even thigh-slappingly funny, provisions that have wormed themselves into our federal tax law. Here are a few Internal Revenue Code oddities.

Communist exemption

Got Tax Questions? CPA Lance Weiss Has Answers.

Apr 7, 2014
dleafy | sxc.hu

It’s that time of year again. Tax time. With just a week and a day to go before April 15, today’s St. Louis on the Air was dedicated to answering questions about filing taxes. CPA Lance Weiss returned to the show to help listeners make sense of the tax code. He’s with the St. Louis tax and accounting firm SFW Partners, LLC.

Over the course of the hour, Weiss answered questions about a range of topics, from health insurance deductions to claiming back taxes, including:

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

As soon as the snow melts, Missourians may find themselves confronting a horde of people stopping them outside stores, on the streets or at their front doors.

The object: to get their signatures on petitions that would put a variety of issues – such as early voting, income taxes and teacher tenure – on the August or November ballot.

(via Flickr/markn3tel)

St. Charles will host numerous prominent conservatives on Saturday, as part of CPAC St. Louis. CPAC is an event for members of the GOP to rally and speak to their base -- and, of course, to posture for presidential and other political aspirations.

2012 Presidential hopefuls Rick Santorum and Rick Perry will be speaking, as will Kansas Governor Sam Brownback.

Speaking with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh, Brownback said a GOP candidate that speaks to true conservatives is more likely to win in 2016.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show: Mo. House Majority Leader John Diehl joins us to discuss the vote count on the controversial income tax cut bill, as well as what veto session is shaping up to look like on a variety of other bills (Doe Run, the so-called gun nullification bill, and Agenda 21). We also discuss Diehl's race against fellow Republican Rep. Caleb Jones for the Speaker's gavel.

Missouri Rep. Mike Colona, D-St. Louis
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show: Missouri Representative Mike Colona joins us to discuss the income tax bill's merits and chances of becoming law, as well as the nationally-covered gun nullification bill. We also discuss the Senate's movement on legislation to add sexual orientation and gender identity to anti-discrimination laws, and Colona shares a story of what it's like to be a gay man in a conservative legislature.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

 

via Kristi Luther and Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications.

The income tax bill that would eventually reduce income tax rates by about a half of a percent is likely to not be brought up in veto session next month, according to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R-Eureka).

Appearing on St. Louis Public Radio's and the St. Louis Beacon's Politically Speaking podcast, Jones said he currently doesn't have the votes necessary for an override of the governor's veto.

Krisi Luther, St. Louis Public Radio.

Credit rating agencies warn that allowing a Missouri income tax bill to become law could have a negative impact on the state's credit rating.

“We believe that if the Missouri legislature overrides the governor’s veto and enacts the legislation, and the federal government passes the Marketplace Fairness Act, it has the potential to result in a significant financial impact to the state, despite requirements for the maintenance of a balanced budget," Standard & Poor's wrote.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

 

Marshall Griffin, KWMU

If the income tax cut bill becomes law in September, millions will be cut from Missouri's public education system, according to Governor Jay Nixon.

It's a common refrain from the Democrat: "You can either be for public education or for House Bill 253, but you can't be both," he told a crowd of business leaders last week.

This week, Nixon released numbers to back up his claim.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto.

Speaking in St. Louis to the Regional Chamber, Nixon said it is a "fiscally irresponsible experiment that didn't work in Kansas and won't work here."

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