infrastructure and transportation

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon will deliver the annual State of the State address on Wednesday night. Ahead of the speech, “St. Louis on the Air” asked its listeners to weigh in on what they want to hear from the governor.

Following are some of the responses we received. They have been edited for length and clarity.

Pam E.: I want to see Medicaid expanded, legalization of marijuana and improved infrastructure.

KWMU photo

(Updated at 5:25 p.m., February 18)

Vice President Joe Biden will be joined by past and present top federal transportation officials on Wednesday when he stops by Granite City to promote the five-year anniversary of the passage of the federal stimulus measure.

In Granite City, Biden is expected to highlight the spending on port improvements along the Mississippi River that were made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which was aimed at stemming the economic downturn underway in early 2009.

(via Flickr/photohome_uk)

The "Complete Streets" legislation under consideration on the St. Louis County Council still faces plenty of roadblocks to final passage. One of the sponsors, Councilman Pat Dolan, D-Richmond Heights, held up the bill again last week, which he’s done since late November, and announced he wants to rewrite parts of it.

Dolan also said that he’s going to meet with groups affected by the bill and come back to the matter early next year.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Since the 1950s, traffic planners have been looking for ways to make it easier to get north and south in St. Louis County. The original plan to extend Interstate 170 all the way to Interstate 44 was officially scrapped in 1997, and the proposed South County Connector is the first plan to make it passed the discussion stage since then.

As conceived, the $110 million road would essentially extend River Des Peres Boulevard to Hanley, and build a new interchange at Interstate 44. But many in the region are wondering why the county wants to build it at all.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Thirteen Illinois communities will split more than $5 million in state grants to help reduce the risk of flooding and pollution caused by storms.

Gov. Pat Quinn announced the so-called "green infrastructure" grants Saturday.

The money will help fund projects to prevent harmful runoff from making its way into water supplies. The projects include installing permeable pavement and rain gardens or using soil and vegetation to restore forests, floodplains and wetlands.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 7:37 p.m. Tuesday, July 16 with comments from St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley 

Local advocacy groups and politicians are urging opponents of a proposed new road through portions of St. Louis County to continue speaking out against the project.

The deadline for comments on an environmental study for the South County Connector is Friday. The streets department will review and respond to them before incorporating them into the study for federal approval.

via Flickr/KOMUnews

A proposed constitutional amendment that would create a temporary one-cent sales tax to fund transportation needs has passed the Missouri Senate.