Insurance Exchanges

Gustavo Valdez, an insurance navigator with the Community Action Agency of St. Louis County helps Charles Niemeyer enroll in health insurance through the healthcare.gov website.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says it is trying new ways to market health insurance to uninsured millennials.

In a press conference Tuesday, officials announced several strategies to target young, healthy adults to balance the risk pool of the Affordable Care Act marketplace.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

On Tuesday, two federal appeals courts issued conflicting decisions that could have major ramifications for the future of the Affordable Care Act.

The controversy hinges on whether people in the 36 states that opted NOT to set up their own health insurance exchanges can qualify for subsidies (really, tax credits) on their health insurance premiums. Missouri and Illinois are among those 36 that don't have state-run exchanges.

(via Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

Updated at 1:43 p.m., Thurs., Dec. 12

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., says she’ll go online within a week to sign up for health insurance on the federal exchange – but she won’t be taking the federal subsidy to help cover the cost.

“I’m not going to take the ‘employer contribution,’ “ McCaskill told Missouri reporters during a conference call Wednesday, referring to the federal government’s share of the health insurance premiums for all federal employees.  She added that her staff will take the subsidy, as most other federal employees will do.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Thinking of buying insurance through the exchange?

While you wait for programmers to fix the glitch-ridden sign-up system, grab a crib sheet and learn the terms that can help you make good decisions about coverage. Pay close attention to words like PPO, POS, deductible, co-payment, drug formulary and many more.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When Alexis Young, a graduate student and part-time health researcher, began looking at her own insurance exchange options, she didn’t experience nearly as much sticker shock as she had expected.

With an income of less than $14,000 a year, she had braced herself for what she’d have to shell out for premiums. The sticker price in her case turned out to be about $2,400 a year for each of two plans reviewed by the Beacon. Of that premium amount, she’d have to pay $280 a year or less out of pocket because she’d be eligible for hefty tax credits to cover the rest.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Business is good at the Pilates and Yoga Center in Ladue. But an issue that continues to interrupt the peace of owner Karen Prechtl is affordable health insurance for herself and her 10 employees.

"It’s insane," she says of her skyrocketing premiums. But she takes comfort in the possibility that, starting Tuesday, relief might come when a new insurance marketplace opens in Missouri and nationwide, promising affordable health insurance for individuals, families and some small businesses. It is expected to open with plenty of promise — and glitches as well.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: An executive at BJC HealthCare said Friday that some patients enrolling in Missouri’s insurance exchange will be able to get health services from its affiliates through an agreement between the hospital system and Conventry Health Inc. That means the patients will have access to medical treatment from doctors and other providers in the BJC network, said June Fowler, vice president of corporate and public communications.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Health policy analysts differ sharply on the conclusions of Wednesday's federal report, which says premiums in Missouri will be about 16 percent lower than previously projected for consumers eligible to buy their health insurance through the government-run marketplace or exchange on Oct. 1. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri consumers wanting to know who will sell them insurance and at what cost through the health reform law’s online marketplace system won’t have answers until Oct. 1, the day the program begins taking applications.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A few years ago, Missouri had a surplus of funds for assisting visually impaired people in the state but had difficulty reaching these clients. The state sought the help of the Missouri Association of Area Agencies on Aging, based in Jefferson City.

Some health providers, administrators and volunteers got a glimpse Thursday at how they and others could help the working poor reap the benefits of medical care through an insurance exchange system that will open for business in the fall.