Jane Cunningham | St. Louis Public Radio

Jane Cunningham

Cunningham, Storch win key legislative contests

Oct 8, 2017

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 5, 2008 - State Rep. Jane Cunningham beat Gina Loudon for the Republican nomination for state senate in the 7th district - the seat held by Loudon's husband John. The margin was 46 percent to 38 percent.  Neal St. Onge finished third.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

As St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley and Councilman Steve Stenger, D-Affton, duke it out in a very public fashion, a lower-key primary is transpiring on the Republican side. Missouri House Budget Chairman Rick Stream, R-Kirkwood, and Green Park Alderman Tony Pousosa are angling to reach the November election, with both emphasizing their professional experience and personal styles.

Since 1991 when Buzz Westfall became county executive, the office has been in Democratic hands.  But some prominent Republicans are bullish about the party’s chances this year.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, has announced that he’s not running for the Missouri state Senate – setting the table for a possible candidacy by former state Sen. Jane Cunningham.

Jones and Cunningham, R-Chesterfield, have been touted as likely candidates after state Sen. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, made the surprise announcement that he’s not seeking re-election to his 26th District seat.

Provided by Mrs. Cunningham

Former state Sen. Jane Cunningham, a Republican from Chesterfield, announced Wednesday that she’s not going to run for St. Louis County Executive – ending several weeks of speculation.

Cunningham said she was doing so because the county GOP is “unifying around our best candidate” who she declined to identify.

“I don’t want him to feel like he has to run against me in order to be the Republican candidate,” Cunningham added.

File photo

(Updated 9:55 p.m. Wed., March 12)

The commission currently overseeing fire dispatching for most of St. Louis County has rejected a move by some fire districts to shift operations to St. Louis County's new emergency center.

Three protection or ambulance districts on the commission for the Central County Emergency 911 had sought the change. But the districts' request appears to be dead, for now, because four votes were needed on the panel before any talks with the county could move forward. 

The commission deadlocked at 3-3 Wednesday night.

Jo Mannies/St. Louis Public Radio

Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul, who was at the center of a high-profile effort last year to oust him from office, is now seeking to be elected to a new job on the St. Louis County Council.

Paul filed Monday afternoon for the 7th District seat that’s now open, since longtime incumbent Greg Quinn announced that he wasn’t seeking re-election this fall.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House of Representatives

Until this week, most of the attention directed at state Sen. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, has focused on his outspoken conservatism and his efforts to block some federal gun laws.

But now the chief question is whether Nieves is preparing to quit the state Capitol.

Nieves said in two text messages this week, the latest on Friday, that he’s not yet ready to discuss the situation -- but many others are.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

Former Mo. Senator Jane Cunningham joins us on this week's show. Cunningham discusses how her district was lost with redistricting, and what she's been up to since. She recently won a contentious race for the Monarch Fire Board, and tells us about her public fights with the local union.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The battle underway in the Monarch Fire Protection District in west St. Louis County involves far more than pink T-shirts and whether the district’s firefighters can sport and sell such shirts to promote efforts to fight breast cancer.

As district board member Jane Cunningham and her firefighter critics see it, the fight is actually over the clout of the district’s collective-bargaining organization, Local 2665 of the International Association of Firefighters/Professional Firefighters of Eastern Missouri.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Area voters on Tuesday selected new mayors in Clayton, Fenton and Chesterfield, and sided with incumbents in Normandy and Valley Park.

The contest in Clayton, St. Louis County's seat, was particularly tight, with former Alderman Harold Sanger edging out two current aldermen: Michelle Harris and Alex Berger III.

Missouri Senate Official Website (Cunningham) and Flickr/KOMU News (McNary)

On Tuesday, two political heavyweights will go head to head after a hard-fought campaign in which tens of thousands of dollars have been spent. The office they’re attacking each other over? A seat on the Monarch Fire Protection District Board in West St. Louis County.

You might remember Cole McNary from his failed bid for state treasurer a few months ago – or from his father, former St. Louis County Executive Gene McNary. You might remember Jane Cunningham for her reputation as being one of the most conservative members of the Missouri House.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Six months ago, then-state Rep. Cole McNary was engaged in a tight race for Missouri state treasurer. A year ago, then-state Sen. Jane Cunningham was seen as a likely candidate for Congress.

Now, the two Republicans, both from Chesterfield, are battling each other in one of the liveliest and most unusual races on the April 2 ballot. 

At stake? A seat on the nonpartisan board governing the Monarch Fire District in west St. Louis County. The victor will be paid $200 a meeting.

Jane Cunningham official website

A long-time St. Louis County lawmaker is leaving office this year because her Senate district was moved to the Kansas City area.  Republican Jane Cunningham of Chesterfield has spent eight years in the Missouri House and four in the Senate, making a name for herself as an outspoken social conservative. 

During her last visit to the Capitol as an elected official last week, she sat down with St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin to talk about her record in office and where she goes from here.

Education reform & Proposition C

Mo. Senator taken to hospital from Capitol

May 16, 2012
(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 5-17-2012, 2:31 p.m.

Missouri Senator Jane Cunningham (R, Chesterfield) has been released from a Jefferson City hospital and is resting at her Capital-area residence.

She left the State Capitol Wednesday afternoon after becoming light-headed during debate on an education bill.  Her Chief of Staff, Kit Crancer, did not disclose the nature of her illness.  He described it as a serious but non-life threatening situation.

(via Flickr/alkruse24)

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to legislation that would double the amount of time required for public school teachers to earn tenure.

Currently, a teacher has to work in the same school district for five years to earn tenure.  The bill sponsored by State Senator Jane Cunningham (R, Chesterfield) would expand that requirement to 10 years.

“As long as the teacher does not own their job, if you will, then they’re going to be really working to prove (themselves) and do a good job," Cunningham said.  "It gives us five more years of encouraging and giving motivation to teachers to really produce.”

Morning headlines: Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Mar 27, 2012
Jane Cunningham official website

St. Louis County Senator will not seek re-election

Jane Cunningham had initially filed to run for the 7th District seat, even though the new Senate map places that district in the Kansas City area.

The Republican from Chesterfield had hoped that the new map would be overturned and that the district she represents would not be moved to the other side of the state.  But that didn’t happen.  Cunningham says she most likely won’t run for a different office, but admits she hasn’t made up her mind yet:

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Candidates for the U.S. Senate, Congress, Missouri General Assembly, Governor  and other statewide offices can now file to run.

Hundreds flocked to Jefferson City today and lined up outside the doors of the Secretary of State’s office to file their paperwork. Among those filing on the first day was Republican Peter Kinder, who’s seeking a third term as Lt. Governor.  Kinder had originally planned to challenge incumbent Democrat Jay Nixon for Governor, but changed his mind last fall.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 4, 2012 - National School Choice Week is ending in Missouri with a flurry of proposals that would sharply increase the number of charters, establish scholarships to private and parochial schools, solve the dilemma over students in unaccredited districts transferring to nearby schools and carve the Kansas City school district into pieces annexed by surrounding districts.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Legislation that’s designed to stop a potential mass exodus of students from unaccredited schools in St. Louis and Kansas City to nearby suburban schools was heard Tuesday before a Missouri Senate committee.

The bill’s provisions include scholarships for kids in unaccredited public schools to attend private schools, and it would allow accredited schools to open charter schools in unaccredited districts.  Tina Hardin of St. Louis spoke in favor of the bill.  Her son was accepted into a Catholic school, but says she can’t afford to send him there.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 19, 2012 - Their electoral battlefields may once again be in flux, but incumbent state senators in St. Louis County are building up financial firewalls in their bids for re-election.

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