Jay McShann

Kansas Citians

Oct 8, 2016

Jazz Unlimited for October 9 will be preempted in the first hour by the Presidential debate and will resume at  10 pm for “Kansas Citians.”  Not only was it an important the center of a great period in jazz, but also Kansas City and its environs were and remain a nurturing place for the careers of many jazz musicians, including Count Basie, Charlie Parker, Lester Young, Pat Metheny, Karrin Allyson and others.  Please note that the first hour of this show will be pre-empted by the Presidential debate.  You can catch the first hour of the show by going the Archive  starting on Monday

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for July 24, 2016 will be “Mel Lewis and Big Bands.”  Tonight’s show is an all big band presentation of the great drummer Mel Lewis in his element.  Lewis was born in Buffalo in 1929 to immigrant parents.  He came to the West Coast with Stan Kenton in 1957 and stayed until 1963, when he moved to New York.  His drumming style was supportive of a band, rather than pushing it.  In 1965, Lewis and Thad Jones founded the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra, one of the greatest big bands in jazz history.  The band played Monday nights at the Village Vanguard and toured all over

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, January 31, 2015 will be “Jazz Giants Born in January and February.”  Jazz Giants are those musicians whose individuality makes them both instantly recognizable by their sound and revered for their inspiring playing. Among these giants are Henry "Red" Allen, Mildred Bailey, Frank Butler, Big Sid Catlett, Kenny Clarke, Curtis Counce, Tadd Dameron, Buddy DeFranco, Roy Eldridge, Jimmy Forrest, Stan Getz, Benny Golson, Dexter Gordon, Wardell Gray, Bobby Hutcherson, Milt Jackson, J. J. Johnson, James P.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for December will be "The Career of Charlie Parker.”  Saxophonist Charlie Parker is one of the most important musicians of the 20th century in any genre.  His phrasing and use of advanced harmony changed music in ways that are being still explored today.  Parker’s music was not a revolution from the swing styles of music and when playing with such players, fit elegantly into what they were doing.  His favorite “licks” or short phrases are heard everywhere, for example, in film music and bluegrass violin music.  In addition to Parker, Jay McShann, Dizzy Gillespie, Don Byas, De

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

The March 10, Jazz Unlimited will be devoted to an examination of tunes about money.  Money is what fuels St. Louis Public Radio.  Some of the srtists to be heard to night include Muggsy Sprecher recorded live at the Silver Dollar Club on Gaslight Square, Ahmad Jamal, J.J. Johnson, Count Basie with Buddy DeFranco, Art Tatum, Phil Woods, Cannonball Adderley, Dizzy Gillespie, Stan Getz, Jay McShann and the World Saxophone Quartet.

Check out my photos of some of the artists heard on the show.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

On February 4, our feature The Quieter Side of Jazz will have music by pianists Elmo Hope, Herbie Nichols, and Jay McShann and drummers Kenny Clarke, Frank Butler and Max Roach.  The second hour will consist of an interview with music with Marc Myers, author of the book, "Why Jazz Happened" (University of California Press).  Myers discusses the technological, business and social currents that made jazz what it became in the 1940's through the late 1960's.  The final hour of the show will feature new music with Joe Lovano, the SF Jazz Collective, Chris Potter, David Liebman and his daughter